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Fuji X-Life
Dedicated to all things in the Fuji X Series
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Fujifilm X-E1 – The stylish new kid on the block | Ian Sheh

Fujifilm X-E1 – The stylish new kid on the block | Ian Sheh | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it

 

The much anticipated Fujifilm X-E1 arrived in Canada early last week and I’ve had mine for about 5 days not. I was hoping for some better weather on the west coast to take some better test shots, but it hasn’t stopped raining. A few days isn’t enough time with the X-E1 to warrant a complete review, but it’s about perfect to know if you’ll love or hate a camera. So there are some quick pros and cons.

 

The Good

- The X-E1 is smaller, and lighter I thought. When the specs were first published I thought the size would about the same as my Konica Hexar rangefinder. The Hexar has been my travel camera for years and I’ve been actively looking for a digital equivalent to replace it; I was ok having a camera of that size. Opening the box I found a camera much closer in size to my Canon Canonet. The X-E1 holds well, with buttons that don’t get in the way of shooting.

- Autofocus is faster than anticipated. After reading all of the pre-production previews I came to think that the AF was going to be terribly slow. It’s not. In good light AF is quite snappy. In low light the lens will hunt a bit if the contrast is too low, and can take a bit longer to lock on. Now it may not be as fast as the Olympus E-M5, but for a mirrorless camera the speed is quit good.

- AF accuracy. When the X-E1 AF locks on it’s dead on, even at f/1.4. I can’t even say that about my Nikon system shooting at f/1.4. This is where Fuji trumps Olympus in AF. As much as Olympus has super fast AF it’s not always accurate; Fuji’s may be slower but it’s dead on.

- Manual dials. I do like the manual dials on the camera. It brings me back to shooting old film bodies. The dials are firm and shouldn’t move when in a bag.

- Amazing image quality. This is the kicker, the X-E1′s images quality is the best in the mirrorless camera category. And I’d even go as far as it rivals some of the best SLRs on the market. The images are sharp and contrasty with very good colour rendition.

- Very good high-ISO performance . High-ISO noise is virtually non-existant in the native 200-6400 range.

- Sans AA filter. Lack of an anti-aliasing filter results in much sharper images.

- Good EVF. The EVF is good. Super high resolution, high contrast, and good color rendition. The only small drawback is it’s slightly slower refresh rate. You’ll notice it if you’re looking for it. If you press the shutter release half way, the refresh rate become much much better. Not sure why that is, or if it was intentional by Fuji.

- It’s a sexy camera. Let’s be honest, the X-E1 is a good looking camera. There are some rumours floating around the web talking about how the name suggests SeXy-One. Either way, it definitely works well as an accessory to a blazer and a good pair of shoes. Now if I can only find a simple brown leather strap for mine.

 

The Bad ....


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R-Space : Memory of Yarn (Fuji X-E1 and 18-55mm lens) | David Cleland

R-Space : Memory of Yarn (Fuji X-E1 and 18-55mm lens)  | David Cleland | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it


I paid a visit to R-Space with the X-E1 and 18-55mm lens to experiment in a different type of photographic environment. The R-Space Gallery was home of the ‘Mak-9 Things that fall in between exhibition‘ and currently houses the work of brilliantly talented Rachel Gomme a solo performance artist who uses knitting as a metaphor. Rachel was knitting constantly from 11am to 4pm and presented a year long knitting experience, a visual timeline in yarn throughout 2010. Today was the opening performance that offered visitors a chance to learn and take part in the creation of ‘the memory of yarn’ with tutors on hand to teach a number of different techniques. It was great to revisit this brilliant, creative space and catch up with what Anthea and Robert have planned for the months ahead. As well as visual installation each exhibit in R-Space is accompanied by a series of workshops and artists talks. It is a gallery worth following on Facebook. There were still some remnants of the Mak9 exhibition left from last June, this really is a striking location. Lotus Dewit’s amazing insects still remain on the old toilet. Scarily real, this is a place where time has stood still. A house filled with history is a perfect location for a creative space focusing on craft and visual arts and the R-Space team really maximise its potential. All photos were taken with the Fujifilm X-E1 with 18-55mm zoom lens.

See David on Flickr:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/flixel/sets/72157631968003701/

 


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Fujifilm X-E1 v X-Pro1 AF Speed Comparison | Matthew Maddock

Fujifilm X-E1 v X-Pro1 AF Speed Comparison | Matthew Maddock | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it


I recently got my Fujifilm X-E1 body and was immediately very impressed with the AF speed, as was everyone else who tried it. It appeared snappier than the X-Pro1, but although I knew the X-Pro1 had improved lately with the new v2.0 firmware, I wanted to see if there was actually any difference between the two with the same lens attached. Wilkinson Cameras in Kendal kindly lent me a 2nd 35mm lens for the weekend so I could try out both cameras side-by-side with the same lens. Having the same lens was essential because the AF performance on these cameras depends greatly on the lens attached. I chose the 35mm as I thought that it is probably the lens most people own and use as their primary lens. It’s also the middle performer in terms of AF speed so we can get a good comparison out of it. The video of the comparison is posted below. I won’t ruin the result for you by telling you here – watch the video and see for yourself! I think most people will be quite surprised by the conclusion.


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Fuji X-Pro1 Mirrorless Camera Review | The Dream Within Pictures

Fuji X-Pro1 Mirrorless Camera Review | The Dream Within Pictures | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
When you first pick up the X-Pro1, it's obvious that it's a solid camera. Roughly the same size and shape as the Leica M9, this is a true competitor in terms of build. An array of buttons along the back side of the camera might ...

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Switching from M9 to XPro1 -- an interesting and provocative review

Switching from M9 to XPro1 -- an interesting and provocative review | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
Quite an interesting review of the XPro1 by Chris Weeks. Chris is one of the reasons I got a M9 a few years ago after watching his excellent street.

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Fuji X Pro 1 and the Soligor MC C/D 70-300mm f/3.8 FD Lens

Fuji X Pro 1 and the Soligor MC C/D 70-300mm f/3.8 FD Lens | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
The Need to Reach Out and Touch Something! These three old shrimp boats were in the boat graveyard in Georgetown, SC. The trouble is that they are just too far away to capture with any of the Fuji ...

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Observing the Relationships of People at the Beach - Street Anthropology

Observing the Relationships of People at the Beach - Street Anthropology | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
Today I spent the day driving all around Houston and then out to the coast in search of a story to capture. What I found was the story of human interaction as viewed from the voyeur perspective obs...
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Seeing in Black & White | Kate Lockhart

Seeing in Black & White | Kate Lockhart | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it

 

Back in the summer, when I was spending time in New Hampshire, I talked about my inability to “see” in black & white. While I do convert a shot to B&W every now and then, it’s not something I do with any regularity. Funny thing is, I LOVE black and white photography when it is done well. When the Leica Monochrome was announced this spring, I found the concept of a digital camera that can only shoot in B&W fascinating. While the cost of the camera is crazy high, especially for a black and white ONLY camera, I’ll admit that there’s something appealing to me about only being able to shoot in black & white. I’m convinced that after a period of time with the Leica Monochrome, I would be able to see in B&W and my B&W photography would improve as well. Fortunately for me, I can use my X-Pro 1 set to “monochrome” as a “poor man’s Leica Monochrome.” Given my recent disenchantment with the X-Pro 1, setting it up as a B&W only camera for a period seems like a good way for me to continue to use it. Fortunately for me, I have one of the world’s most gorgeous models at my disposal every day. So, with the X-Pro 1 set to monochrome mode, I grabbed my girl and commenced with a portrait session. What’s so cool about the X-Pro 1 is that using the electronic viewfinder (EVF) I can see the photo in black and white as I compose it. So I LITERALLY get to see the shot in B&W before I take it. It’s sort of like cheating, but I found it helpful. I’m very happy with the results from this “shoot.” In fact, I think these are some of the best shots I’ve taken of Fenway. I’m confident that if I keep using the X-Pro 1 in monochrome and I become more comfortable shooting in black and white you’ll begin to see more monochromatic shots on the site.


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Fuji X-E1 Impressions: Using with Leica lenses

Fuji X-E1 Impressions: Using with Leica lenses | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
View the article's original source Author: Mike Evans (Photo: Fujifilm)Over the past couple of years there has been enormous interest in using manual-focus lenses on the new technically advanced mirrorless cameras such as the Sony NEX–7 and Fuji’s...
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Fuji X100 revisited (part III) | Konstantinos Besios Blog

Fuji X100 revisited (part III) | Konstantinos Besios Blog | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
This is the third and final installment on my reevaluation of the the Fuji X100 camera. I have written a lot during the previous two parts so I will just add a few final words. Despite the fact that this is a camera I don't feel very ...
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Evan Christopher during Rehearsals | Gerry Walden

Evan Christopher during Rehearsals | Gerry Walden | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it

 

One of the things that I have found the X-Pro1 has enabled me to explore more is the possibility of a new approach to my jazz photography. Because it is so good in low light shooting at 6400iso, and because it is so unobtrusive in use, I have been able to move amongst musicians in a way that I have not felt able to do before. There is also another ‘low noise’ side of the camera, the sound of the shutter firing is so minimal that it is not like the gun shot of a DSLR. In fact, at the touch of a button, it is totally silent. Musicians concentrating in an empty auditorium can find that sound of a DSLR shutter very distracting – and recording engineers or film crews will threaten to lynch you if you are not careful! Clarinetist Evan Christopher is from New Orleans (although born in California) and is one of the best around. These are two of the images I took at sound checks/recording of his group Django a la Creole a recent concert in Southampton using the 35mm lens at 1/125th @ f1.4. The iso was 6400, and I processed the image in Lightroom 4. I find that Lightroom is great for handling the raw files from the X-Pro1, and the black and white conversions are very simple. The tone control is as good as Evan manages on the clarinet!

 


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Stuff UK Names Fujifilm X10 Camera of the Year 2012 - Photoxels - Digital Photography

Stuff UK Names Fujifilm X10 Camera of the Year 2012 - Photoxels - Digital Photography | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
Fujifilm X10 Stuff UK has published their Gadget Awards 2012 and the Fujifilm X10 has won the Camera of the Year award, beating the Olympus OM-D E-M5, Canon (Stuff UK Names Fujifilm X10 Camera of the Year 2012 http://t.co/GZoohSA6...)...
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A couple of weeks with the XE-1 | Adam on Rangefinderforum

A couple of weeks with the XE-1 | Adam on Rangefinderforum | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it

 

... early thoughts, including comparison with the nex-7:

 

1. it works best with the lens it was designed for. the 35 fuji is a surprisingly nice lens, but it's AF and that's still taking some getting used to for me (i had a frustrating amount of focus errors - AF is fast but not action/sports/street-at-night fast). however, it does give rather nice results.

 

2. high ISO is pretty much awesome. i shot 3200 and 6400 at a local music thing and was very, very surprised at the results, both in jpg and in the abysmally messed-up RAF format. No contest, this is a better night shooter than the nex-7 was for me.

 

3. the controls are great. the menu is simple and straightforward, the manual shutter speed and EX dials on the top are extremely useful (much more so than the ever-so-vague tri-navi on the nex-7) and the manual-assist button is logically placed as a thumbwheel-press so it's very easy to use. plus, a regular pro-style shutter button (ie, it can take a softrelease) instead of the p&s-style on the NEX.

 

4. the EVF is surprisingly good. let's get it out of the way, however... it's not a window finder. it blacks out when you shoot. you can't see outside your frame. your whole anticipation mechanism needs to change, but maybe not to an unreasonable degree. it stinks in bright sunlight (oops). it's not as fast to focus as an RF. that said, it's very very usable. i'm still waiting for more available-darkness opportunities, but for a night shooter, it seems fantastic.

 

5. manual lenses work pretty well. i've shot a bunch of contax and ltm/m mount on it and i'm pretty happy with the results. i'm getting over the crop factor (i'm back to RD-1 territory), but since i shoot normal to moderate-long, i'm good. focusing is fast enough (again, it's not an RF and shouldn't be expected to perform in the same way). i will say that i bought a metabones g mount adapter and really, really like it. all of a sudden, these lovely lenses are at the front of my line. i had a junky adapter for the NEX and it was an exercise in frustration. MF with the fjui 35 is kind of a pain in the neck, but much better than MF with the sony kit lens.

 

6. it's small, stealthy and quiet. i find it less stealthy with the 35/1.4 (which is a big lens) than with a manual focus lens. the shutter is really, really quiet.

 

7. RAF files are going to be a problem. they're slow to render in LR 4.2 and sometimes stuff gets cut off at the top and bottom of the frame (really). so i silkypix into tiff for the ones i like and then put the tiffs in LR. slow, inelegant and the 50MB tiffs are a waste of perfectly good electrons. maybe 4.3 will have some answers. silkypix really sucks. the jpgs are very nice but there is a noticable difference in night shooting at 3200 or 6400 vs the RAFs. sigh.


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Breaking the Rules | Thomas Park on Digital Photography Review

Breaking the Rules | Thomas Park on Digital Photography Review | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it

 

There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs - Ansel Adams

 

In a previous article, I discussed several so-called 'rules of composition'. Compositional rules, however, can be polarizing and divisive. Is this because as artists, we prize independence and don't like to, 'color in between the lines'? Or is it because we've all experienced disappointment when slavish application of the Golden Ratio still produces drab and lifeless images? Certainly, great works of art have been produced throughout history that paid no heed to pre-determined compositional rules. You may ask then, if compelling art is not created by simply following rules, what's the point of learning the rules in the first place? That's a great question.

Now this is not going to be an article suggesting that all compositional rules are 'bad' or 'wrong'. Instead, what follows is a look at the rationale behind some established compositional rules. I'd argue that by understanding the intent behind a rule, we can subvert or break the rule to create drama or focus the viewer's attention in creative and novel ways. Let's begin with an example from another visual medium: drawing. 


A story about eyes

Many years ago, my great-uncle - an accomplished painter and sculptor - was teaching me how to draw portraits. He suggested placing the eyes at the vertical midway point of the head. This 'rule' won't be surprising for anyone with a drawing background, but for many people, the idea that the eyes are halfway down the face is unintuitive - it seems too low! I recently had a conversation with a friend who received the same advice from his father, despite the fact that he and I grew up in different countries. The fact that two artists from opposite sides of the planet were taught the same 'rule of eyes' points to one source of artistic rules: observations about the natural world. In reality, are everybody's eyes exactly halfway down their face? No, but it's a good starting point that is visually pleasing and conforms to our expectations of illustrated portraits. In fact, a distinguishing feature of children's drawings of people is that the eyes are placed 'too high up' on the face. This is a simple rule that helps us to draw a more realistic portrait. Just as importantly, however, understanding this rule allows us to make deliberate choices. We can draw a face with the eyes in the middle of the face for a natural look. We can instead place the eyes above the midway mark to give the drawing a more child-like quality. Or we can place the eyes below the midway mark to make the drawing look furtive or comical.


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Park in Fog | Jeff Seltzer

Park in Fog | Jeff Seltzer | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it


Where I live in Southern California ("The Valley") it's rare that we get really thick fog this far inland...it's even more rare that we get really thick fog this far inland, and I'm not too lazy to wake-up and photograph. So, it was a rare occasion indeed last weekend that I got a chance to capture some images at the park around the corner. I love fog because it creates a clutter-free background with just about anything, which is important to me when I shoot. Early morning is also great at the park because there's a relative lack of people getting in my way. Still, several runners stopped and just stared at me as I photographed, no doubt thinking, "what the hell is he taking a picture of??!" (which is a typical reaction for me). All images are taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 with 35mm lens.


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Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R: When Normal is Good | Better Photography

Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R: When Normal is Good | Better Photography | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
K Madhavan Pillai discovers why so many photographers are all praise for the Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R, and then goes on to find out where it falters.

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The Fuji RAW problem… is it about to be solved? | Fuji Rumors

The Fuji RAW problem… is it about to be solved? | Fuji Rumors | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
The Fuji RAW problem… is it about to be solved? A reader of Fujirumors directed our attention to a post in the dpreview-forum (click here). According to this rumor, Fuji is working with Adobe and Apple to make their software ...

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FUJIFILM X-Pro1 versus X-E1 | Antonino Zambito

FUJIFILM X-Pro1 versus X-E1 | Antonino Zambito | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it

 

X-Pro1 oder doch lieber die X-E1. Fujifilm macht es einem auf den ersten Blick nicht gerade einfach eine Entscheidung zu treffen. Zu ähnlich scheinen beide Kameras. Beide Modelle haben den selben Bildprozessor und 16.3 Millionen Pixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS Sensor. Beide haben eine Serienbildfolge von sechs Bilder in der Sekunde und zeichnen Full HD Videos mit 24 fps auf. Beide haben ein Metallgehäuse und verwenden das selbe Bajonett für Objektive. Ebenso werden beide aus dem selben Material gefertigt und wie gewohnt auch hochwertig verarbeitet. Damit enden aber auch die Gemeinsamkeiten. Während die X-Pro1 einen Multi-Hybridsucher hat der es ermöglicht zwischen einem optischen und einem elektronischen LCD Sucher mit 1.44 Millionen Bildpunkten hin und her zu schalten, wurde die X-E1 mit einem neuen 2,36 Millionen Pixel OLED Sucher ausgestattet. Dadurch dass das optische Suchersystem fehlt, ist die X-E1 kleiner und schmäler als die X-Pro1. Das macht sich auch auf dem rückseitigen Display der X-E1 mit seinen 2,8″ und 460K gegenüber der X-Pro1 mit 3″ und 1230K bemerkbar.....

 

Google Translater (ENG):

http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fantoninozambito.wordpress.com%2F2012%2F10%2F31%2Ffujifilm-x-pro1-versus-x-e1%2F&act=url

 

 


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Fujifilm shows X-Pro1 lens roadmap with a stabilized zoom and an ultra-wide prime coming this fall | Stuff-Review

Fujifilm shows X-Pro1 lens roadmap with a stabilized zoom and an ultra-wide prime coming this fall | Stuff-Review | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
Fujifilm shows X-Pro1 lens #roadmap with a stabilized zoom and an ultra-wide prime coming this fall - - RT...
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Review: Really Right Stuff BXPro1 L-plate and grip for Fujifilm X-Pro 1 « Zen Galleria

Review: Really Right Stuff BXPro1 L-plate and grip for Fujifilm X-Pro 1 « Zen Galleria | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it
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X-Pro1 shoots Día de los Muertos | Chris Dodkin

X-Pro1 shoots Día de los Muertos | Chris Dodkin | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it

 

The Mexican Day of the Dead – Dia de los Muertos is a festive and celebrative time. It is a holiday with a complex history and fusion of old traditions. This view of death started with Meso–American cultures such as the Olmecs more than 3,000 years ago. Meso–Americans believed that during this time of the year, the boundaries that separate the living and the dead weaken and that the deceased could visit the living. Many immigrants, especially the Oaxacan community, have brought these traditions with them. Non-Mexicans are learning that Dia de los Muertos is a celebration of life and death that speaks to everyone who has lost somebody.

My local festival is held at the Catholic Mission in Oceanside, and is very well attended - with tributes to the deceased, traditional dancing, mexican food, and many people dressed as skeletons and sugar skulls .....

 

For the people shots, I used EF-X20 fill flash, still with the ND filter fitted, as this kept the shutter speed within range for flash sync. I mostly backed the flash off -1/3Ev to avoid an overtly 'flash' look. All shots are with the 35mm f/1.4 lens on the X-Pro1.


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Paris 2012 with the Fujifilm XPro-1 | Keith Miles

Paris 2012 with the Fujifilm XPro-1 | Keith Miles | Fuji X-Life | Scoop.it

 

Perambulations in Paris...


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