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Fujifilm X-Pro1 in-depth review: Digital Photography Review

Fujifilm X-Pro1 in-depth review: Digital Photography Review | fuji x | Scoop.it
Digital Photography Review: All the latest digital camera reviews and digital imaging news. Lively discussion forums. Vast samples galleries and the largest database of digital camera specifications.
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Good bye Fuji X100 - Last set of images :) - Micro Four Thirds User ...

Good bye Fuji X100 - Last set of images :) - Micro Four Thirds User ... | fuji x | Scoop.it
Hi Guys I bought Fuji X100 twice and sold it twice. To be honest I do like X100 but there is nothing which my OMD cant do . I loved the simplicity and.
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VSCO Film 02 x Fujifilm | Visual Supply CO

VSCO Film 02 x Fujifilm | Visual Supply CO | fuji x | Scoop.it


We’ve updated VSCO Film 02 for LR 4 and ACR 7 to include Custom Camera Profiles for Fujifilm professional cameras, including the X100S, X-Pro1, X-E1, the X100 and the X10. If you are an owner of VSCO Film 02 for LR 4 or ACR 7, this update is FREE. Login to your vsco.co account and re-download the Film 02 pack. If you don’t own VSCO Film 02, it is 15% off till end of day Friday, May 3rd, 2013. Additionally, as an owner of VSCO Film 01, Film 03 and or VSCO Keys, you are eligible to receive an additional 25% off with your VSCO Loyalty Discount. We’ve also updated the Film 01 and 03 for LR4 and ACR 7 to include support for Fujifilm’s outstanding X100S. Login to your vsco.co account and re-download and install the respective pack. For more details on how to update your existing VSCO Film pack with the new Fuji Profiles, check out this article in FAQ. Provided below are a collection of spectacular sample images by Jonathan Percy, a photographer and producer based out of New York. Jonathan is currently an Executive Interactive Producer at the advertising agency BBDO & shares his personal imagery on his blog. All of Jonathan's images below were processed with VSCO Film 02, utlizing the Fujifilm Custom Camera Profiles.


Via Thomas Menk
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Zeiss debuts Touit lenses for Sony, Fuji mirrorless cameras - imaging resource

Zeiss debuts Touit lenses for Sony, Fuji mirrorless cameras - imaging resource | fuji x | Scoop.it
Zeiss debuts Touit lenses for Sony, Fuji mirrorless cameras
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The Carl Zeiss Touit 2.8/12 lens, shown mounted on a Fujifilm X-Pro1 (left) and Sony NEX-7 (right) camera body.
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Fuji X100s Review - Fallin'in Love All Over Again | Luminous Landscape

Fuji X100s Review - Fallin'in Love All Over Again | Luminous Landscape | fuji x | Scoop.it

So you're dating this great gal.  She smart, cute, and good company.  She seems to really care for you and gives you most of what you need. You take her everywhere. Your friends like her. You think this could be the one.  Then, one day, her folks invite you over and introduce you to her sister. See where I'm going with this? At first glance, they look just like twins.  If you look closely, the younger sister's hair is done a little different, and she's in slightly better shape. For the most part, however, the differences seem  trivial.  But then she comes over and sits down, and you start to talk.  She got a quick wit. Real quick. Smarter than her sister, clearly, and a lot more insightful. Her tastes are more refined and she can hold her own on any topic.  And man, she gets you like you've know each other forever! She finishes your sentences and laughs at your jokes. You're in serious trouble brother.... And so it is with the Fuji X100s.  So much like her older sister, but with so much more going on beneath the skin. Because this is a romance-rekindled kind of article, a lot oof what follows focusses on improvements on shortcomings over the X100, and things I would still like to see improved.  All of that might give the impression that the X100s isn't a great camera in it's own right. It ain't so.  If this were a stand-alone review of a brand-new machine, without a rich family history, the bottomline would be this:the X100s is the best rangefinder-style camera Fuji has made.  It produces even superb images, focuses faste processes fast and breaks every meaningful barrier to working in low light.  All-around it is all good.  That said, my detailed review follows......

Conclusion

Fuji has momentum, and it's not stopping. While the market for point-and-shoots has been dramatically eroded by smartphones, and APS-C SLRs are under pressure from ever more-capable EVF machines, Fuji has created a vibrant market of retro-yet-ultra-contemporary cameras -- like the X100s.  These machines capture perfectly the contemporary ethos of Ihassle-free nstagram-style photography, yet do it in a fully professional package. Work remains to be done on their control-set, but Fuji has made tremendous strides with this innovative line of cameras.  I can't wait to see what they come up with next. In the meantime, let the new street and travel king be crowned!

 

 


Via Thomas Menk
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Fujifilm X-Pro1 review | Cameralabs

Fujifilm X-Pro1 review | Cameralabs | fuji x | Scoop.it
Looking for a Fujifilm X-Pro1 review? I tested this unique big-sensor camera with all three prime lenses against the Sony NEX-7 and Canon EOS 7D!
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THERE’S A BETTER WAY – Fuji X100s review | Olaf Sztaba

THERE’S A BETTER WAY – Fuji X100s review | Olaf Sztaba | fuji x | Scoop.it

Remember when you bought your first digital SLR camera? You thought, “What a piece of engineering!” You opened the box and took the first glance as excitement and joy ran through your veins. No more film, no more limitations and the ability to take as many photos as you want. The world was your oyster. You went through the manual and the number of options, menus and settings left you gasping. While the battery was still charging you were already planning your first photo endeavour. Then you ran outside with your shiny new camera and started shooting like mad. After all, with digital there are no limits. In the evenings you hit the Internet. You were sure you had the best camera on the market. You read all the reviews that were proving your point. But wait, you thought, “Maybe I should get a better lens, a better-rated lens.” You scratched together all the money you could and bought a huge, beautiful pro-rated lens. “Now I can take really stunning photos!” you cried. You drove to the nearest park and photographed everything around you: benches, trees, leaves, people, even hydrants. You uploaded your photos, looked at them at 100%, and admired sharpness and dynamic range. Again, you went on the Internet, hit the blogs, forums and ratings and thought, “If only I had a telephoto lens, I could take even more amazing photos.” The next day you visited your local dealer and came back with a massive telephoto 2.8 pro-rated. WOW!


But wait! Another question hit you. “How I am going to carry all this equipment?” You ran back to the store and picked the largest and best camera backpack you could afford. Daily you carried the backpack with your expensive SLR and superb lenses and took hundreds of photos. Sure the bag was heavy and the camera overwhelming but you told yourself, “This is the price I have to pay for top quality.” You justified an inconvenience. You kept uploading your photos to the computer, then processing and uploading them on the Internet. Next, you repeated your mantra about your camera’s superiority. You followed this sequence religiously every day. But despite your best efforts, photography had become an almost robot-like endeavour. Then it hit you. Something was not right! You noticed that others were taking much more interesting photos that were more engaging, more powerful. You went through them, you counted every pixel and you compared. Sure their photos were not as sharp as yours, the resolution was lower, the dynamic range was nowhere near yours but somehow their images were so much better and more interesting. You grumbled to yourself, “It is not possible! After all, I spent thousands on my equipment and I feel I am going nowhere!” You nervously studied the 300-page manual and asked yourself, “Maybe I am missing some settings? If only I knew how to set up…” You fell asleep with the manual as your pillow. Next day in the field you set up a tripod, put your brand new, huge, super-fast lens on your camera, went through your settings, played with all the buttons and you came back home… with even more mediocre photos. Your frustration was growing. Where is the joy? Where is the passion? Should I buy a better lens? Should I change my in-camera settings? Weeks and months passed and you left your heavy backpack at home more often. You became unengaged and uninspired. You started avoiding photography. What a chore it had become! You think, “Maybe that’s just how it is. Maybe I am overreacting. Maybe this is the new normal.”  The following day you bumped into a kid next door and he showed you a few photos he had taken with his iPhone. You immediately dismissed the quality and told him to buy a real camera but deep down you admired his images, creativity and passion. You went home depressed and discouraged. Then, one day you came across your old friend who was holding a small and interesting camera. Out of respect and curiosity, you took it, looked through the viewfinder and played with the controls. At first, you felt hostile towards this tiny camera. After all, at home you had whole backpack of expensive gear. But deep inside you had a strange feeling. Something drew you closer. It was the strange but familiar feeling you had when you shot Leica or Contax film cameras. You could not stop thinking about the little camera you held in your hands today. After a few days of internal struggle you decided to go for it. You realized what had been missing.


How many of you have had a similar experience? I did.........


Via Thomas Menk
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PeterPrism's comment, May 3, 2013 5:08 PM
Thomas you are mentioned in this article "Finally, “Scoop It” by Thomas Menk should be bookmarked and followed; it has great photographs and insights." Cheers
Thomas Menk's comment, May 4, 2013 3:12 AM
Thx Peter for your comment and thx to Olaf for his nice mention :-)
Michael Petersen's curator insight, May 4, 2013 8:44 PM

There are so many new camera coming out it is hard to keep up