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CES 2014 | New Grips - Fuji X-Series | Chris Dodkin

CES 2014 | New Grips - Fuji X-Series | Chris Dodkin | Fuji | Scoop.it
I got a chance to see and try the new Fuji grips this morning - for the X-E1/2 and the X-Pro1. Both grips remind me of RRS equipment – they are very light weight but strong, and are well made – Boxes say made in China on them. Both grips attach using an allen key and screw – so they are not something you’d be taking on and off frequently. They felt good on camera – less obtrusive than the current grips – at least to me......
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Twitter / PicturesEarth: Fuji volcano with cherry blossom ...

Twitter / PicturesEarth: Fuji volcano with cherry blossom ... | Fuji | Scoop.it
Fuji volcano with cherry blossom tree, Japan. http://t.co/vtDrJszFCi
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Fujifilm X-Pro 1 scouts Prague | Jim Gamblin

Fujifilm X-Pro 1 scouts Prague | Jim Gamblin | Fuji | Scoop.it
A break was needed or least that is how I thought of it. Perhaps a little history first. My journey in photography began at the age of 12. A few years went by using my father’s Retina IIa. At first I started photographing races at Laguna Seca race track, then some work on the high school newspaper. After a stint in the Army, I became much more interested and involved in the craft. Which resulted in building my own darkroom and buying my first Nikon SLR camera system in 1973. Later on after going to a photographic institute in California, I made my way to Los Angles to work in the commercial photo studios there with the intent to open my own someday. It was not to be for a number of reasons and I eventually made it back to the San Francisco Bay Area. Where I immediately got some work doing location scouting for the film industry. San Francisco being a much filmed at location. At first I thought this would be temporary, but then twenty years went by before knew it. As it turned out, it was the right job for me. No studio overhead to worry about. Travel not only around California, but to most of the western states and much of the eastern seaboard. Photographing places, things and people and getting paid for my efforts. Luck has been with me in this regard. Now I find myself living in the Netherlands, teaching photography courses and shooting a few weddings a year. Back to that “break” I needed. Prague the capital of the Czech Republic and the historical capital of Bohemia, happens also to be, much like San Francisco a city favored by film makers. So I decided to go there on a self invented assignment, harkening back to the days of my old job. The difference though was instead of two or three Nikons bodies and assorted lessons, I was going to go “light”. This is where the Fuji X Pro 1 came in. In addition there was the decision on which lenses to bring. The choice was eventually narrowed down to the Fujinon 35mm f/1.4, an old Contax/Zeiss 90mm f/2.8 and my latest acquisition, a Voigtlander 50mm Nokton f/1.5. A lens that I will be doing a later review on. The whole kit, including accessories and camera bag (see photo) came in at 2.4 kilos /5.3 pounds. A break was needed or least that is how I thought of it. Perhaps a little history first. My journey in photography began at the age of 12. A few years went by using my father’s Retina IIa. At first I started photographing races at Laguna Seca race track, then some work on the high school newspaper. After a stint in the Army, I became much more interested and involved in the craft. Which resulted in building my own darkroom and buying my first Nikon SLR camera system in 1973. Prague is beautiful! Sort of like being in Yosemite Valley where every where you look, there is another picture waiting to be made. However it became immediately apparent that I was not the only person who thought so. Here it is in the end of February, minus temperatures, snowing and every where there are tourists. Oh well so much for my deserted streets look.....
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X-Pro1 Using Custom Settings | For RAW Shooters and Film Fanatics | Adam J Piper

Custom settings can be an extension of the film simulations, adding another layer to your jpgs, or they can be set up to give you the best preview of your RAW files, enabling you to make better exposure decisions. I show you how to set them up, use them effectively and some of my favourite settings for your Fuji X cameras....
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Dublin in Fujicolour & First Impressions of the Fuji XE1 | Thomas Fritzgerald

Dublin in Fujicolour & First Impressions of the Fuji XE1 | Thomas Fritzgerald | Fuji | Scoop.it
Now that Adobe have (for the most part) sorted out their issues with the Raw conversion of images using Fuji’s X-Trans sensors, I decided to bite the bullet and step back into the fuji ring. Since selling my X-Pro1, I’ve missed the wonderful colours that Fuji cameras produce. While I do get them with the X100, the fixed focal length limits the type of shots you can take. Anyway, my local camera store had a great deal on the XE-1 so I decided to give the X-Trans one more shot. I’ll have a full review in a little while, but I wanted to share some of the shots I got on my first trip out with it. Some quick first impressions… Colour is the key thing with fuji’s cameras. That’s what makes them so special in my opinion. The colour these cameras produce has a unique character to it that’s really beautiful. Operations wise, the camera feels very similar to the X100, more so than the X-Pro1. It’s very light too. In fact, I think it might be too light. I was getting a lot of motion blur from camera shake, even at high shutter speeds. I don’t have particularly unsteady hands, and it hasn’t been a issue with any other camera I’ve ever used, so I’m guessing it’s a balance issue. The lens feels heavier than the camera body, soI’m guessing this is throwing things off when I press the shutter. I’m going to get a half case and hopefully that little extra bit of weight might address this issue a bit. For the moment I was shooting on burst mode, so that the actions of pressing the shutter could be offset by taking multiple shots I’m not overly impressed with the sharpness either, which I know is surprising considering the Fuji’s reputation. I have the 35m 1.4, and it’s sharp for fairly close objects, but taking cityscapes, and anything with a lot of repetitive detail, the results are not nearly as sharp as the results I get from my Sony Nex-7 (and yes, I know that has more pixels – but per pixel sharpness is not as high). It could be a back focus issue with the lens, but the results look similar to those I had shot before with the 35mm when I had the X-Pro1. Anyway, It could be just that it’s new and I’m being very picky. Close up detail looks fine. It’s weird. I’ll reserve judgement on that for a while. Over all the camera is much snappier than the X-Pro1 was, but I did only have it with the original firmware. It didn’t lock up on me once despite a whole morning of shooting (where as the X-Pro1 would frequently freeze for a few seconds while it figured out what it was doing) Autofocus is still pretty slow with the 35mm but I never found t so slow as to be a deal breaker. The zoom lens is much faster at focussing, but it’s not as sharp. Anyway, I’ll have a more in-depth review at a later day. For now, let the pictures do the talking ….
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