Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training.
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Quest 3: Damsel in training to avoid a situation of Distress....

Quest 3: Damsel in training to avoid a situation of Distress.... | Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training. | Scoop.it

Remember Rachel from my Quest 2? (Emergency Response) I have chosen her as my Damsel. From the internet, I have sourced some relevant material to assist her in Risk Management and Prevention and to help manage and create awareness of the OHS issues in her workplace environment. 

Michele Whillock's insight:

Rescue teams are highly trained and experienced and well prepared for an emergency situation. To avoid a situation where the rescuer needs to be rescued regular training is essential and safety plans and procedures need to be followed.

Thankfully Rachel isn't rescuing people everyday, her 'day job' however involves high risk high voltage electrical switching.  

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Quest 3: Damsel in a Vertical Rescue.

Vertical Rescues are a hazardous situation. It can involve working under extreme pressure both physically and psychologically. Knowledge of rescue equipment and procedures is extremely important. This safe work course book gives a complete overview of Vertical Rescue. 

Michele Whillock's insight:

The ability to work in a team requires my damsel to communicate effectively as it is necessary for all team members to be aware of the situation and be able to follow instructions.

Harnesses and ropes used in rescue must be in 'good working order' and it is important that equipment is used, stored, inspected and cleaned correctly to avoid failure or injury. 

All rescue operations require Rachel to use Personal Protective Equipment - PPE. Avoiding personal injury, such as falling debris in her eyes or more serious injuries such us unconsciousness, is vital. 

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Changes to low voltage switchboard rescue training - Department of Justice and Attorney-General

Michele Whillock's insight:

It is important that my damsel is up to date with current changes to legislation in her profession.

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Quest 3: Hazardous Material Standard

This document describes the requirements for the management of risks associated with the handling, transport and storage of Hazardous Materials in accordance with Australian Standards.

Michele Whillock's insight:

Rachel is trained and licensed in HAZMAT Response. This information is most likely to have been similar to her training material. Hazardous substances can cause hazards such as oxygen deficiency, atmospheric contaminants or flammable atmospheres.  These can result in breathing difficulty, respiratory disease, serious injury and/ or death. It is extremely important for the rescue team to be highly trained and experienced. 

 

 

 

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Quest 3: Post-trauma support in the workplace: the current status and practice of critical incident stress management (CISM) and psychological debriefing (PD) within organizations in the UK

Quest 3: Post-trauma support in the workplace: the current status and practice of critical incident stress management (CISM) and psychological debriefing (PD) within organizations in the UK | Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training. | Scoop.it

Although this information considers organisations within the United Kingdom, They strongly relate to workplace situations within Australia.

Michele Whillock's insight:

Unfortunately my damsel may arrive at some pretty horrific scenes, handling strong emotions such as fear or anxiety from facing dangerous and tragic circumstances can be challenging. 

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may be a issue which Rescuers face. Being able to obtain support, recognise symptoms, and treat them reduces the risk of mental disorders.  

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playing tennis

playing tennis | Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training. | Scoop.it

Adam, Swifty, Nathan and myself all play wednesday night fixtures tennis. Unfortunately it was raining on the last night before the school holiday break so I was unable to get a photo of us all playing. So instead I chose one from the resurfacing of the back artificial grass courts done a couple of months ago.

 

Michele Whillock's insight:

Our region is known for it’s bad ‘black soil’ and it wreaks havoc for the tennis courts. When the soil gets wet and drys again it cracks and lifts the earth and in turn does the same to the surface of the courts. This poses a  forever ongoing hazard. The front flexi-pave courts were only resurfaced 10 months ago and already one of them is unusable due to the ground movement and uneven surface. Flexi-pave courts also become slippery when wet. Playing on uneven and slippery ground increases the risk of slips, trips, falls and muscular skeletal injury especially for our veteran players. Lighting also is a bit of an issue on our courts, some lighting is dull and not only do they attract stink bugs, moths and docile kookaburras chasing moths. They don’t have any padding around them! So when you go for that wayward ball you just hope you don’t go head first into it.

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Coal mine Operator

Coal mine Operator | Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training. | Scoop.it

My other half Nathan is a multi-skilled operator at the local coal mine. On this occasion he is operating the dozer in the recovery of a bogged haul truck. After recent rain the ground was soft and the haul truck operator drove too close to the soft edge. 

 

Michele Whillock's insight:

Before the recovery takes place everyone involved in the operation attends a a safety meeting and each operator completes a Job Risk Analysis (JRA) and a ‘Take 5’ this is to assess and control or eliminate the risks and hazards. Coordinating and conducing a safe recovery is essential to avoid personal injury, death or damage to machinery/ equipment. The circuit is shut down to eliminate the interaction of other heavy machinery this avoids more incidents/ accidents. Regular positive communication between the dozer operator and truck operator is crucial throughout the recovery and it is also a key safety procedure in all operations of the mine.

 

This situation involved four workers, two on the ground and one in each machine. It is vital that all workers are alert and aware of what is going on within the situation. Operators must keep positive eye site on the workers on the ground so they don't get run over. The ‘spotters’ which are the workers on the ground need to be alert at all times as there is a chance that the truck could tip further over on it’s side and crush them. The water pipe running along side of the bogged truck is at risk of being crushed and flooding the area with water so communication between the spotters and operators is vital.  

Spotters are also exposed to environmental elements such as sun exposure and dust. Uneven and soft ground increases the risk of a trip fall hazard.

 

The thick metal sling- tow rope which used to tow the truck is heavy and requires two people to lift, if handled alone could cause strain to the body or back injury. The rope also had frays so it was important that the workers were wearing gloves to avoid injury. When the rope is under pressure (being pulled) there is a risk of the rope snapping and causing serious injury and/or damage.

 

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Two workers electrocuted, one fatally, on John Holland power project in Queensland | CFMEU Victoria

Two workers electrocuted, one fatally, on John Holland power project in Queensland | CFMEU Victoria | Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training. | Scoop.it

High Voltage Electricity can be fatal so it is crucial that workers are trained and aware of the risks and hazards.

Michele Whillock's insight:

Hopefully learning from this accident prevents it from happening again. So my damsel doesn't face a similar situation.

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Quest 3: Basic steps to Preventing my damsel from falling from heights.

Michele Whillock's insight:

Working with high voltage power lines, Rachel may need to rescue an unconscious worker who has been electrocuted. These unforeseen circumstances place Rachel in a high risk situation. There is always a risk of falling from a height. Adequate training prepares my damsel to avoid this situation.

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Quest 3: Informative & Useful information - Confined spaces Guide

This guide to working safely in Confined Spaces will inform and refresh Rachel's memory from her training and help to manage the risks and hazards she would face in an emergency situation...

Michele Whillock's insight:

This is an excellent guide for my damsel to working in confined spaces!! Rachel may need to rescue or recover a trapped person from a confined space which can be challenging due to the environment in which they occur. Confined spaces are generally narrow and constricting and have poor lighting and ventilation. Confined spaces may contain either a gas or liquid which is hazardous can be fatal or cause serious harm or injury to the rescuer. 

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Quest 3: Guidance notes -fatigue-risk-management.

Even though this risk management focuses on the mining industry. It would be a very similar structure to Rachel's company policies and procedures.  

Michele Whillock's insight:

Fatigue can be a factor in any workplace. I don't want my damsel to make silly mistakes and put her life or someone else's at risk. This risk management guide can help her recognise the signs of fatigue and avoid injury, damage or death.

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Emergency Response team member

Emergency Response team member | Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training. | Scoop.it

This is my friend Rachel. She is part of the Emergency Response Team as well as being a Senior qualified Electrical Tradesperson at the local power station. Various rescue operations and environments exhibit a diverse range and degree of risks and hazards, each is assessed and a rescue plan is devised. When the siren alerts the emergency team meets in the first aid room for a safety talk. Everyone is briefed and assigned a job according to their skills and training. Training in specialised skills is carried out for one week a year and one day a month to keep up to date. It is essential that training is kept up to date, it ensures the safety of everyone involved in a rescue and avoids injury or death. Knowledge and communication are key safety elements. 

 

Michele Whillock's insight:

This photo shows Rachel in a controlled ropes training exercise against a water tower,  the risks and hazards are low. However it is a skill which can be applied to a high risk situation such as the rescue of a person who is dangling unconscious from a height in their harness. It is important that the ropes and climbing equipment are carefully looked after and regularly checked for damage to avoid them from fraying and breaking and consequently leading to a worker falling from a height and injuring themselves and/ or the person being rescued. Ropes can also get caught or cut on sharp edges so Rachel is careful and aware of the ropes at all times. PPE is mandatory and standard as it aids in the prevention of personal injury for example wearing a hard hat and safety glasses is a preventative measure for loose rocks and dirt falling on her head or in her eyes.

 

Fatigue can play a role in a rescue, it might take hours to perform. Pulling up and down on the ropes and with the weight of the person being rescued can cause strain and soreness to her arms. The company has a fatigue management policy, shifts are 12 hours long and if a worker feels they are ‘unfit for duty’ they are assessed and appropriate action can be taken such as being sent home, not participating in a rescue and in some cases driven home. If an emergency happens towards the end of shift a new crew is brought in.

 

Rachel can face a number of OHS issues such as unpredictable rescue surroundings, mountainous/ uneven ground, industrial settings, working at heights, extreme environmental conditions wildlife and sun exposure. The rescue truck is well equipped with first aid, food and lots of bottles of water to prevent loss of energy and dehydration.

 

All workers have a ‘duty of care’ to ensure safe working procedures and for the safety of themselves and their fellow workers. On completion of a rescue a de-briefing takes place where a discussion of the events is reviewed. The rights and wrongs are considered and the health and mental well being of the rescuers is assessed. Counselling is offered to any worker needing it and is encouraged in the event of a horrific rescue. 

 

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Qualified Electrician

Qualified Electrician | Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training. | Scoop.it

Meet “Swifty” aka Anthony. He is a highly Qualified Electrician at the local coal mine. He has been there for a number of years since completing his apprenticeship after leaving school.

Swifty’s number one OHS issue is electricity, however working in a coal mine he faces many other OHS risks and hazards. Such as, the interaction with large heavy machinery, environmental factors - sun exposure, uneven ground, wind and dust, wildlife - snakes and dingos, fatigue, explosives and potential fire. Different situations and environments pose different level of risks these are assessed and controlled by Swifty before he commences work, in a 'Take 5' risk assessment. High voltage repairs and maintenance pose a higher risk of hazards and require a greater deal of preparation and paper work compared with low voltage work, this doesn't mean that low voltage is safer. All electrical work can cause electric shock, electrical burns, electrocution and even death. Other Injuries can include falling from a heights,  trips, slips and falls..

Michele Whillock's insight:

Here Swifty had repaired damaged wiring on a lighting plant. The repair is carried out in a workshop which is a safe controlled environment. While the risks are minimised hazards still exist. When working on any electrical equipment Swifty must isolate the energy source by using personal locks, which you can see hanging from his waist belt. By isolating the source with his own personal locks this prevents other workers from turning on a machine and potentially electrocuting themselves as well as Swifty.

 

If the re-wiring is not done correctly this will cause the wires to be ‘live’ and can also potentially electrocute someone or damage machinery. 

 

Swifty is wearing PPE which is compulsory and standard to the mining industry. This is to help prevent personal injuries. A hard hat can protect the head from falling objects or knocking it on low objects, safety glasses can avoid dust, hazardous substances, shrapnel in the eyes, hearing protection from noise, gloves to protect the hands from corrosive materials and long sleeves and pants help to protect the skin from sun exposure and hazardous substances. 

 

Other hazards Swifty may face are stretching, manual handling and dehydration, but he generally tries to avoid them. Through correct techniques and drinking lots of water.

 

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OHS Electrical's curator insight, July 21, 2015 7:42 PM

This article emphasizes the dangers of electrical work, but it is not just electricity that is dangerous.  Every work place and home environment presents its own unique array of hazards and dangers.  Escaping the consequences of these dangers is possible, often by minimizing the risks that are taken.  The home is the second most common location for fatalities with 33% of all accidents occurring in the home.  These all add up to many medical visits per year and billions of dollars for the country in medical costs.  Some simple home safety tips can make the home much safer.

Dust and soot can be a real hazard if it enters the eyes.  Therefore, wearing safety glasses can minimize the risk, which makes working in this environment much safer.

Falling rocks is a dangerous situation to be in and the wearing of safety boots can prevent major injuries.

The ‘Take 5’ risk assessment is one way of thinking through each task, spotting hazards, assessing risks and identifying controls that may be put into place to eliminate dangers and to ensure jobs are carried out safely.

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Maintenance Fitter

Maintenance Fitter | Quest 2..friends & leisure - OHS around me & Quest 3.. Damsel in training. | Scoop.it

This is my friend and neighbour Adam, he is a Maintenance Fitter. Adams job is to service and maintain water pipelines which span a distance of 68.5 kms from Awoonga to Callide, in Central Queensland. There are three pump stations along the way and many air valves. It takes about three days to inspect all the air valves from start to finish, this can involve bleeding out air to prevent cavitation to replacing faulty floats. As the pipeline stretches over a long distance he faces a variety of environmental hazards such as sun exposure, dehydration, mountainous/ uneven ground and wildlife - brown snakes, wasps spiders. 

 

As part of company procedure before Adam starts his shift he is required to complete a Safe Work Method Statement or better known as a SLAM - Stop Look Assess Manage record. Basically this is a pocket sized note book which requires all workers to fill out their name, location, date and task description. It also lists fourteen ‘Can I manage this hazard’ questions which they are to answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to by ticking the appropriate box. Where a ’yes’ tick is applicable a list is made of the hazard and controls are then put in place. This aids them to be aware of the hazards in the workplace.

 

Michele Whillock's insight:

Here Adam is working on a non-return valve in one of the pump stations it is located down a 25.5 meter tunnel/ pit. This task involves many hazards and there are standard controls in place to ensure workers safety. 

 

Firstly, before they enter and proceed with the task they must communicate with head office via radio so that everyone is aware of what is happening and where workers are. There are two radios one located at the top of the pit and one at the bottom. Contact must be made with head office every hour that work is being performed for a safety check and then again when the workers exit on completion.  

 

Three points of contact must be made at all times when going up and down the stairs, landings and ladders, this is either by holding on with two hands and grounded with one leg or grounded with two legs and holding on with one hand this is to prevent falling.

 

It is important that Adam is wearing the correct PPE. The water pumps are very noisy when the are on so ear plugs or muffs are essential. As are, a hard hat and safety glasses for protection against other hazards such as falling objects and dust. 

 

Adam needs to be aware of the ground he is walking on as water puddles and pipes create slip, trip, fall hazards.

 

The pit is well lit and ventilation is sufficient, however if there was a system failure breathing apparatus, an emergency kit and and an emergency ‘stop’ button can all be located efficiently. 

 

Adam works 12 hour shifts and fatigue can be an issue depending on the task and environment he has been working in. However if he wants to work overtime he then has to perform and pass a fatigue test, which is a series of tasks to test alertness and reaction time. Passing this test grants one hour of overtime.

 

In the event of a catastrophic failure, say a gasket fails- lets go, the mega-litres of water and the force at which it flows (PSI) will either sever limbs or most likely a cause a drowning. Thats why maintenance is imperative. 

 

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