Freeters in Japan
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Japan's Economic Stagnation Is Creating a Nation of Lost Youths - DailyFinance

Japan's Economic Stagnation Is Creating a Nation of Lost Youths - DailyFinance | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
Beneath the bright lights of Tokyo and the evident wealth generated by decades of hard work and Japan Inc.'s massive global export machine lies a different reality: increasing poverty and decreasing opportunity for the nation's young people.
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Ranks of Unseen, Unemployed ‘SNEPs’ Growing

Ranks of Unseen, Unemployed ‘SNEPs’ Growing | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
First there were "Freeters," then there were "NEETs." Now, here come the "SNEPs."
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Tokyo Freeters - Japans junge Aussteiger

In Japan verdingen sich mehr als vier Millionen junge Menschen als Gelegenheitsarbeiter - darunter viele mit abgeschlossenem Universitätsstudium. Sie werden ...
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フリーター全般労働組合 - Wikipedia

フリーター全般労働組合(ふりーたーぜんぱんろうどうくみあい)は、「すべての非正規労働者のためのネットワーク『PAFF』(Part-timer, Arbeiter, Freeter & Foreign Workers)」から派生した日本労働組合で、PAFFの基盤組織と位置付けられている。加入組合員数は不明。コミュニティ・ユニオン全国ネットワークに加盟しているが、上部団体には所属しないいわゆる独立系労働組合である。

2004年8月に結成された労働組合である。フリーターなどの非正規雇用労働者の他に、失業者・生活困窮者・ワーキングプアなど雇用形態を問わず、幅広く加入資格を認めている。 本拠地は当初早稲田にある交流スペースあかねであったが、その後西新宿にあるMKビルというビルに移った。 また、組合員の一部はグッドウィルの派遣スタッフによる労組「グッドウィルユニオン」の立ち上げに関わった。

2010年、麻生邸見学ツアー逮捕事件で逮捕された3人に対して、国と東京都に対して計400万円の損害賠償を求める「麻生邸リアリティツアー国家賠償請求訴訟団」を結成し、東京地方裁判所に提訴した[1]

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Youth Employment in Japan's Economic Recovery: 'Freeters' and 'NEETs' :: JapanFocus

Youth Employment in Japan's Economic Recovery: 'Freeters' and 'NEETs' :: JapanFocus | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus. In-depth critical analysis of the forces shaping the Asia-Pacific . . . and the world.
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Japan's QE will leave its workers out of pocket with lower quality of life

Japan's QE will leave its workers out of pocket with lower quality of life | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
Michael Burke: Desperate times call for desperate measures, but this response to stagnation will boost profits at the cost of spending power

apan's central bank has announced a policy of what is describes as a massive increase in creating money, in the hope of ending a generation of economic stagnation. The local stock markets have soared after the announcement from the Bank of Japan (BoJ) and the yen has once more weakened sharply against the currencies of major trading rivals in Asia and in Europe.

Desperate times call for desperate measures. Japan has suffered 24 years of low growth and outright falls in prices. When the bubbles in the stock market and in land prices burst in 1989, Japan was the second largest economy in the world and had been closing rapidly on the lethargic US economy. Now, it is a fraction of the size of both the US and euro-area economies. It has also long been surpassed by its former colony of China, which is due to be the world's largest economy in three to five years.

Economic stagnation matters. In a capitalist economy the distribution of national income does not remain static even if aggregate economic activity is unaltered. National debt has ballooned. Far from Keynes' recommendation of the "euthanasia of the rentier", increased public debt puts the finance sector on life support. At the same time, formerly world-leading companies such as Sharp, Sony and Panasonic are in crisis, unable to match competition from South Korea, China and elsewhere. Living standards have fallen dramatically as women and young people are increasingly excluded from the workforce and real wages have fallen. Japan's recent history also refutes the idea that an era of zero growth will prevent economic calamity. Not only have there been repeated nuclear disasters, but per capita CO2 emissions have risen while economic activity remains in the doldrums.

British policymakers have more reason than most to learn from Japan's bold monetary moves. George Osborne threatens austerity policies to last until 2018 and the Office for Budget Responsibility always forecasts recovery two years away. Britain is facing its own lost decade.

Any prescription needs to based on a diagnosis of the ailment. The primary cause of Japan's long crisis is a fall in investment. In cash terms the Japanese economy has fallen by ¥53tn from its peak, a fall of 10%. The decline in productive investment on the same basis is almost exactly the same at ¥54tn. The slump in investment accounts for the entire fall in nominal GDP. Because of deflation the economy has not declined in real terms, but instead has grown at a snail's pace. The investment strike by Japanese firms has led to their hollowing out and a hollowing out of the entire economy. This explains why the electronics giants and others are in crisis.

Radical monetary policy does not address the investment strike. Instead, its first effect is to increase the price of financial assets, stocks, bonds and perhaps even property prices. There is a hope that it will also lead to a persistently weaker yen, which would make Japan's exporters more competitive. This is not guaranteed, as speculative money also flows into Japan precisely because of rising financial asset prices. But currency devaluation alone can only ever be a beggar-my-neighbour policy, and advanced industrialised countries like Japan cannot sustainably compete on price. They are forced to compete on quality and value-added, which requires investment.

It is a stated aim of policy to generate consumer price inflation. Yet no Japanese policymaker is proposing that wages should have a matching rise. If the policy is successful it will be highly damaging to living standards as inflation eats away at pay levels. A combination of increased asset prices, lower real wages and a weaker currency will boost profits. This is the real aim of policy, following the sudden lurch lower of Japanese profits in 2011. 

Japan turned sharply right in its recent general election, and the new government has appointed one of its own to lead the BoJ. Economic policy has also turned right in order to boost Japanese capital at the expense of both competitors and the domestic workforce. No doubt, policy makers in Britain and beyond are watching carefully. 

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Uncertainty clouds new law seeking job security for non-regular workers - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun

Uncertainty clouds new law seeking job security for non-regular workers - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
In five years' time, labor advocates will know if a new law that takes effect in April to improve the unstable, low-paying positions that 14.1 million workers toil under, or fully one-fourth of those now employed, is successful or leads to more...
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US Follows Japan: The Rise of Freeters, aka Temps « naked capitalism

US Follows Japan: The Rise of Freeters, aka Temps « naked capitalism | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
Commentary on current economic and financial news.
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Rethink Work - Reasearch Office - Japan's 'Freeter' & our increasing temporary employment

Rethink Work - Reasearch Office - Japan's 'Freeter' & our increasing temporary employment | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it

The ‘freeter’ is the Japanese term for someone who perpetually works part-time in order to spend the other half of their time exploring their passions. 

The term obviously conjures up the notion of ‘freeloader’ in western culture, it’s someone who lives off of others. But we’d like to ask whether the negative connativity of ‘freeter’ is deserved.

See here from the anthropology blog ‘Anthropology Archive’:

 

“During the 1980s, a new type of worker, termed ''freeter,'' emerged in Japan. ''Freeter'' is a contraction of ''free Arbeiter', and implies a serial part-time worker who only holds part-time jobs or who moves from one job to another. A freeter has no intention of settling down to a serious career, and spends most of his or her time pursuing other interests or just enjoying freedom….

 

The declining chance of coming across a permanent job to which a young person can commit themselves undermines their commitment to the job in which they are currently engaged, and results in a rash of unemployment and job-switching. Young part-timers become dependent upon their parents, creating the so-called ''parasite singles'' phenomenon (Yamada 1999). The emergence of parasite singles is a direct consequence of a substantial decline in labor demand for young people and of structural changes in the corporate environment, as well as of the psycho-social characteristics of today's youth.”

 

Japan’s economy is an interesting case study in super-efficient, fast-paced rise to global economic wealth that it provides a vision of post-great-recession cultural attitudes. 

More mainstream cognition regarding (over-)consumption and disillusionment with the political ecology of wealth were present in Japan after the beginning of it’s recession  and continued throughout it’s decades of stagnation. You’ve only got to check out the work of Japan’s most translated author, Harukai Murakami:

“Latter-day capitalism. Like it or not, it's the society we live in. Even the standard of right and wrong has been subdi-vided, made sophisticated. Within good, there's fashionable good and unfash-ionable good, and ditto for bad. … Mix 'n' match. Like pulling on a Missoni sweater over Trussardi slacks and Pollini shoes, you can now enjoy hybrid styles of morality. It's the way of the world—philosophy starting to look more and more like business administration. “ Dance, Dance, Dance

 

The question we'd like you to consider is this: what’s wrong with working to earn enough to get buy? What’s wrong with putting your ‘real energy’ (for lack of a better term) into your passions? This is the kind of life that artists and innovators have always had. They say that those who truly never work a day in their lives are those who enjoy their work. Spending time on your passion may mean that one day you find a way to make a living at it. 

Or not. And that’s probably ok too. Economic prospects are fewer these days and governments have less money. Local cooperative caring, farming, digital organisation, youth ministries all need a few good volunteers who probably wouldn’t do it and do it so passionately and so well if they had to.

What we’re looking for here is a balance, a balance that provides for everyone economically and humanistically. What do you want out of life?

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The arduous audition process to become a Cold Stone Japan part-timer

The arduous audition process to become a Cold Stone Japan part-timer | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
The success of Arizona-based ice cream chain Cold Stone here is proof positive that Japan has as big a sweet…
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Taking Jobs for a Test Drive | Lifestyle | Trends in Japan | Web Japan

Taking Jobs for a Test Drive | Lifestyle | Trends in Japan | Web Japan | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
Many developed countries have been grappling with a common headache - how to create decent job opportunities for young people amid rising unemployment and the spread of low-paying irregular work.
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Freedom and Survival - The Freeter Union

Synopsis Freedom and Survival -- The Freeter Union" is the story of a Japanese Union created in 2004 in Tokyo through and for Freeters. Freeters are mostly y...
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Japan's Rootless and Restless Workers

Japan's Rootless and Restless Workers | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
Shiho Fukada has been photographing the effects of the economic crisis in Japan, where notions of personal prosperity and lifetime employment have eroded.
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YOUNG PEOPLE AND WORK IN JAPAN: FREETERS, NEETS, TEMPORARY WORKERS AND SHY ABOUT WORKING ABROAD - Japan | Facts and Details

YOUNG PEOPLE AND WORK IN JAPAN: FREETERS, NEETS, TEMPORARY WORKERS AND SHY ABOUT WORKING ABROAD - Japan | Facts and Details | Freeters in Japan | Scoop.it
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