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Freelance Translating
News, facts, thoughts about translation and freelancing
Curated by Thomas Tolnai
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City staff working on emergency translation protocol after only-in-English ... - The Oregonian

City staff working on emergency translation protocol after only-in-English ... - The Oregonian | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it
City staff working on emergency translation protocol after only-in-English ...
The Oregonian
Staff from the bureau took new signs out to McCoy Park today in several languages, including Arabic, Afrikaans, Somali and Spanish.

Via Aurora Humarán
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Dictionnaire sur l'INFORMATIQUE (FR) (EN)

Dictionnaire sur l'INFORMATIQUE (FR) (EN) | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it

"Glossaires / dictionnaires bilingues informatique (anglais-français). Plus de 18.000 de termes triés par thèmes : réseau, programmation, hardware, ..."


Via Stefano KaliFire, Haralabos Papatheodorou
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Lucy Brooks's curator insight, May 30, 6:18 AM

IT changes all the time. The only way to keep up is with an online glossary. This one is FR-EN

 

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iPhone App Localization: 7x More Downloads By Localizing App Keywords

iPhone App Localization: 7x More Downloads By Localizing App Keywords | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it
How to localize your app keywords. iPhone app localization has helped me get 767% more downloads. Start localizing your app keywords today!

Via Elizabeth Sánchez León
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Localizing Wearables, Schmerables: Why Italians Should Have Designed Google Glass | Blogos

Localizing Wearables, Schmerables: Why Italians Should Have Designed Google Glass | Blogos | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it

Via Elizabeth Sánchez León
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q = f(t) (where ”q” is quality and ”t” is time)

q = f(t) (where ”q” is quality and ”t” is time) | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it
Yes, yes, I know. I have neglected my blog for far too long… But this is only because I’ve had a couple of very busy months and I couldn’t afford the luxury to blog. But you know ...
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Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What It Is and How To Recognize the Signs

Translator’s Dementia (TD) – What It Is and How To Recognize the Signs | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it
Translator’s dementia (TD) is a relatively recent neurodegenerative disorder, believed to be caused by the environment in which freelance translators are forced to live, and by the conditions...

Via Maira Belmonte, Samuel Evans
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Tabers medical dictionary

short standard 49016 - Venes: Taber’s Cyclopedia Medical Dictionary -- 21st Edition -- FA Davis

Via Haralabos Papatheodorou
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Asterix Heads to the Highlands to Kick Some Bahookie

Asterix Heads to the Highlands to Kick Some Bahookie | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it
He's back, and he's being a right ol' pain in the bahookie. Yes, the Asterix book has been published with its first ever Scottish Gaelic translation.

Via TranslateMedia
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Funny glossary of translating

Funny glossary of translating | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it
20,000 words: The amount of words (some) clients think can be translated overnight. Back translation: (1) I can’t proofread and I don’t trust you. Send translation of your translation. (2) Back tra...

Via lexicool.com, Samuel Evans
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Natalia Franco [Translation and Localization]'s curator insight, September 17, 2013 11:45 AM

"Sample Translation: A long document a client has split between 20 agencies as a way of getting the work done for free." LOL

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Organizing Translation Resources: Three Different Approaches

Organizing Translation Resources: Three Different Approaches | Freelance Translating | Scoop.it

One key decision that translators using CAT tools have to make is how to organize their resources. By resources I mean primarily translation memories and terminology bases storing one’s legacy translation solutions. The basic approach is creating a single translation memory (TM) and term base (TB) for all projects in a given language combination (for example: English to German, French to Spanish). This is the so-called big momma approach, and it has the obvious advantage of keeping everything in a single place and easy to manage. But it also has the disadvantage of not allowing you full control over the systematic use of a client’s language and style in your translations. A second approach is setting up one translation memory and term base for each domain (for example: legal, business, medical etc.). This gives you more control over how previous translation solutions will be used again – if a term or expression has one translation in corporate language and a different translation in medical language, then you will surely profit from this approach. But it increases your management efforts, i.e. you will need to dedicate an additional amount of your time when moving your resources between tools or even when upgrading your primary CAT tool. A third approach is organizing your resources by client: one TM and one TB for each client. That way, you have full control over how a client’s preferred translations will be used throughout the project and in future projects. This is key in companies with a strong corporate identity or clients who are especially sensitive to the way their products or services are portrayed in their translated materials. Of course, having a TM and a TB for each client (even if it is only for each big client) means a lot more resource management effort on the part of the translator. I don’t think there is one approach that is best for all translators. Rather, I think that translators should consider what their (and their clients’) needs are and then devise a plan to achieve the highest productivity and quality possible. As for me, I prefer to have a mix of the third approach (TMs and TBs for each client) and the second approach (TMs and TBs for each domain), creating client-specific resources only for really big or especially demanding clients, and even then in most cases I use a client-specific TB and a domain-specific TM. I found this to be very productive in my personal case – I work primarily for direct clients and a few translation agencies with higher quality standards. What I don’t find productive at all is the big momma approach, as I work with 3 language combinations, 2 primary domains of specialization with several sub-domains and several occasional working domains. Besides, my preferred CAT tool allows me to use several secondary TMs and TBs for each project and select one of them as the primary resource, so adding resources sent to me by a client or used for other clients/domains is like a breeze. I am sure there are other approaches, though. So, what about you, fellow translators? What method(s) do you have in place to organize your legacy translation solutions?


Via Charles Tiayon
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