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Rescooped by Kamal Sedra from Freedom of the Internet
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Google Defends Internet Freedom | Human Rights Watch

Google Defends Internet Freedom | Human Rights Watch | Freedom | Scoop.it
Last month, Google - one of the world's most important technology companies - stood up to the Chinese government by making it clear that it will not be complicit in censoring information and ideas.

Via Atkins
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Rescooped by Kamal Sedra from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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The road to internet freedom in China is paved by individual messages

The road to internet freedom in China is paved by individual messages | Freedom | Scoop.it
It’s hard for those with a relatively free internet to understand what it’s like to wonder whether or not your post is going to be visible or not. It may make it through or it may get censored.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Rescooped by Kamal Sedra from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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The state of Internet freedom worldwide, in 1 map | Wash Post Blog

The state of Internet freedom worldwide, in 1 map | Wash Post Blog | Freedom | Scoop.it

Every year, Freedom House publishes a report on the world's most and least digitally repressive countries. The worst offenders haven't improved much according to the latest edition of the report, out Thursday. But other countries experienced some striking changes over the past year.

 

Freedom House's index runs from 0 to 100, with 0 meaning "completely free" and 100 implying the opposite. Burma improved by 13 points, rising from a rank of 75 to 62. The country, also known as Myanmar, has gotten markedly more open in the wake of recent political reforms, spurring hopes for greater transparency and ease of access to credible information.

 

Broad swaths of the Middle East remain significantly unfree, with Iran and Syria leading that list. However, Tehran has recently made multiple promises to relax restrictions on the Web.

The United States, meanwhile, dropped five points in the wake of this year's revelations about NSA surveillance. The only country to see its ranking fall even further was India, which dropped eight points in the netfreedom index.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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