Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay
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Frankenstein's monster: Why gothic is more popular than ever

Frankenstein's monster: Why gothic is more popular than ever | Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay | Scoop.it
Gothic remains a perennial theme but never more so than today. Why so?
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totally cool article. 

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Rhodes2006.pdf

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Amazing study on what constitues a 'beautiful' face. Could be tied into analysis regarding beauty/the Creature/etc. 

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The Real Story of Frankenstein's Monster (Full Documentary)

The Real Story of Frankenstein's Monster (Full Documentary) ... ... ... 2013 This documentary and the rest of the documentaries here are about important time...
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Some excellent information in this documentary. Great stuff about setting if you are considering writing about that. :)
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Gothic Romanticism: architecture, politics and literary form | The Gothic Imagination

Gothic Romanticism: architecture, politics and literary form | The Gothic Imagination | Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay | Scoop.it

Duggett argues that the split between ‘Romantic’ and ‘Gothic’ was not simply accidental or a later critical imposition on the period. He argues that the first generation of Romantic poets (specifically William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey) were actively instrumental in ‘the creation of a wider “Gothic culture” and “second Gothic poetry” that differentiated a ‘distinctive, purer Gothic’ literature over and above the Gothic novel for instance. Whereas Michael Gamer’s work, Romanticism and the Gothic (2000) shows the emergence of Romanticism out of the broader cultural umbrella of Gothic, Duggett argues that ‘the phenomenon known as Romanticism is a reform movement within [my emphasis] the Gothic —less a break-away reformation movement than a program for a counter-reformation.’ Gothic Romanticism looks at the discourses of architecture, politics and literary form in order to reappraise the works of these three key Romantic poets, especially Wordsworth.


Via Ricardo Lourenço
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Rad. So rad. 

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26 November 1831: The origins of Frankenstein-As a revised edition of her famous novel Frankenstein is published, Mary Shelley reveals the genesis of the story

26 November 1831: The origins of Frankenstein-As a revised edition of her famous novel Frankenstein is published, Mary Shelley reveals the genesis of the story | Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay | Scoop.it

Many and long were the conversations between Lord Byron and Shelley, to which I was a devout but nearly silent listener. During one of these, various philosophical doctrines were discussed, and among others the nature of the principle of life, and whether there was any probability of its ever being discovered and communicated.

They talked of the experiments of Dr. Darwin (I speak not of what the doctor really did, or said that he did, but, as more to my purpose, of what was then spoken of as having been done by him), who preserved a piece of vermicelli in a glass case, till by some extraordinary means it began to move with voluntary motion. Not thus, after all, would life be given. Perhaps a corpse would be reanimated; galvanism had given token of such things; perhaps the component parts of a creature might be manufactured, brought together, and endued with vital warmth.

Night waned upon this talk, and even the witching hour had gone by before we retired to rest. When I placed my head on my pillow, I did not sleep, nor could I be said to think. My imagination, unbidden, possessed and guided me, gifting the successive images that arose in my mind with a vividness far beyond the usual bound of reverie. I saw - with shut eyes, but acute mental vision - I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together; I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out; and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half-vital motion.


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Cool stuff!

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JSTOR: ELH, Vol. 56, No. 3 (Autumn, 1989), pp. 543-569

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One page access only: but if you are super clever you can find excellent quotes just from this one page.

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The Educational Legacy of Romanticism

The Educational Legacy of Romanticism | Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay | Scoop.it
Papers of a conference held at the Calgary Institute of the Humanities, Oct. 13-18, 1988.
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Interesting article about Frankenstein and education. Very interesting, very cool.

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Frankenstein

Frankenstein | Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay | Scoop.it
Mary Shelley S Frankenstein, True To Early Nineteenth-Century Romanticism, Provides A Chilling Account Of The Con-Sequences Of Tampering With Nature And Of Transgressing Human Limits To Knowledge.
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Scroll down to page 266 for an excellent article called "Facing the Ugly - The Case of Frankenstein" - which starts with this lovely quote: 

Whatever else can-and has-been said about Victor Frankenstein's monster, one thing cannot be denied: the creature is exceedingly ugly. 

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Prophets of Science Fiction - Episode 1 - Mary Shelley

Prophets of Science Fiction hosted by Ridley Scott posits the science-fiction imaginings of the writers of the past are now becoming the science realities of...
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Great documentary. We watched about 12 mins of this in class in September - but I recommend watching the whole thing as there is some excellent information about Shelley's personal life in this. 

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Monstrous Vintage Covers of Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein ...

Monstrous Vintage Covers of Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein ... | Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay | Scoop.it
Mary Shelley was only 21 years old when she published her first (and greatest) novel, Frankenstein. A small London publishing house quietly issued 500 copies in 1818 of the gothic novel about a scientist who invents a ...

Via Catherine Ingham, Ricardo Lourenço
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Amazing vintage covers

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Greg Horne's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:59 AM

The cultural significance of Shelley's novel shown through book cover art & design. It is interesting to note again, how influential James Whale's film has been on the public imagination. It is hard to get away from those neck bolts!

Frankenstein Rec's curator insight, July 17, 2014 5:53 PM

"Frankenstein Rec" gothic horror romance novel now published!

 

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Gothic Literature

Gothic Literature | Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay | Scoop.it
This introductory study provides a thorough grounding in both the history of Gothic literature and the way in which Gothic texts have been (and can be) critically read.
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Amazing information about Gothic literature. Easy to read - just skip down to the introduction part. 

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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein | Frankenstein Literary Analysis Essay | Scoop.it
Perhaps best recognized for the horror films it has spawned, Frankenstein, written by 19-year-old Mary Shelley, was first published in 1818.
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Excellent information. :)

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JSTOR: PMLA, Vol. 95, No. 3 (May, 1980), pp. 332-347

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Feminist perspective on Frankenstein - very useful article from last year.

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