Fragments of Science
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Roll over Freud: Rise of animal therapy

Roll over Freud: Rise of animal therapy | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Beasts of burden, winners of wars and beloved as the sport of Kings -- now horses are being used to cure the ills of modern life.
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Fragments of Science
The history, present and future and nature of science and their relationship
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A better understanding of cell to cell communication

A better understanding of cell to cell communication | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Researchers of the ISREC Institute at the School of Life Sciences, EPFL, have deciphered the mechanism whereby some microRNAs are retained in the cell while others are secreted and delivered to neighboring cells.
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Mercury shines in blue and gold

Mercury shines in blue and gold | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
NASA's Messenger spacecraft has given scientists their best view ever of Mercury, the nearest planet to the Sun.
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Scientists unveil map of 'epigenome'

Scientists unveil map of 'epigenome' | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
For the first time, scientists have mapped out the molecular "switches" that can turn on - or off - individual genes in the DNA in more than 100 types of human cells.
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Mathematics to reveal the secrets of the brain

Mathematics to reveal the secrets of the brain | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Researchers will now be using mathematical modelling and heavy computations to understand how the brain can both remember and learn.
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How can we still see the Big Bang? — Starts With A Bang!

Ask Ethan #75: How can we still see the Big Bang? - Starts With A Bang! - Medium
Why do we continue to detect the cosmic background radiation?
Is the fact that we continue to eternally see the cosmic background radiation billions of years after it was generated proof of either inflation, or that the universe must be curved back upon itself (i.e. that it is finite but unbounded)?
Or if neither of these are requirements, then what are other explanations?

I want you to think about the history of the Universe.
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This Is What The Human Body Really Looks Like Under A Microscope

This Is What The Human Body Really Looks Like Under A Microscope | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Some of these photos are artistic, others are terrifying.
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Scientists discover bacteria that haven't evolved in more than 2 billion years

Scientists discover bacteria that haven't evolved in more than 2 billion years | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Wedged inside rocks in the deep sea off the coast of Western Australia lurks an organism that hasn't evolved in more than 2 billion years, scientists say.

From this deep-sea location, a team of researchers collected fossilized sulfur bacteria that was 1.8 billion years old and compared it to bacteria that lived in the same region 2.3 billion years ago.
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New Technique Reverses Aging By Decades In Cultured Human Cells

New Technique Reverses Aging By Decades In Cultured Human Cells | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Scientists from Stanford Medical Center have devised a technique for extending the length of human telomeres. It's a breakthrough that could eventually result in therapies to treat a host of age-related diseases, including heart disease and diabetes. It could also result in longer, healthier lives.
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Quantum dots combined with antibodies as a method for studying cells in their native environment

Quantum dots combined with antibodies as a method for studying cells in their native environment | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—To understand cell function, we need to be able to study them in their native environment, in vivo. While there are many techniques for studying cells in vitro, or in the laboratory setting, in vivo studies are much more difficult.

Via Paulo Gervasio
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Crystal light: New family of light-converting materials points to cheaper, more efficient solar power and LEDs

Crystal light: New family of light-converting materials points to cheaper, more efficient solar power and LEDs | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Engineers have shone new light on an emerging family of solar-absorbing materials that could clear the way for cheaper and more efficient solar panels and LEDs. The materials, called perovskites, are particularly good at absorbing visible light, but had never been thoroughly studied in their purest form: as perfect single crystals. Using a new technique, researchers grew large, pure perovskite crystals and studied how electrons move through the material as light is converted to electricity.
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Scientists map all proteins in the human body

Scientists map all proteins in the human body | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
New protein catalgoue will be key instrument in the development of new types of medicine.
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Colour me chemical

Colour me chemical | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Colour is all around us, but almost all pure compounds are white. That's not surprising when you know what it takes to make a thing coloured, writes Theodore Gray.
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Major breakthrough in reading ancient scrolls

Major breakthrough in reading ancient scrolls | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Revolutionary software is making a breakthrough in reading 2,000-year old Herculaneum scrolls, computer scientists report. After working for more than 10 years on unlocking an ancient piece of history, what lies inside damaged Herculaneum scrolls, one researcher will accomplish the next step in allowing the world to read the scrolls, which cannot be physically opened.
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Satellite sea science, drones vs heart attacks, and plasmons

Satellite sea science, drones vs heart attacks, and plasmons | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
A quick look at other science news this week: ocean acidification measured from space, nano drugs target arteries, new plasmon materials, and nitrogen fixing gets a whole lot older.
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Lithium comes from stellar explosions

Lithium comes from stellar explosions | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
A large amount of lithium, one of the key elements in the chemical evolution of the cosmos, is produced by stellar explosions called novae.
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Link found in how cells start process necessary for life

Link found in how cells start process necessary for life | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Researchers have found an RNA structure-based signal that spans billions of years of evolutionary divergence between different types of cells, according to a new study. The finding could alter the basic understanding of how two distinct life forms -- bacteria and eukaryotes -- begin the process of protein synthesis.
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A new twist in understanding the brain’s maps

A new twist in understanding the brain’s maps | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
The brain’s GPS would be worthless if it simply contained maps of our surroundings that were not aligned to the real world. Now we know how this is done.
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Mysterious Indo-European homeland may have been in the steppes of Ukraine and Russia

Mysterious Indo-European homeland may have been in the steppes of Ukraine and Russia | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
New research suggests herders north of the Black Sea were early speakers of Proto-Indo-European, the ancient tongue that gave rise to hundreds of languages, including English
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Gamma bubbles of the Milky Way

Gamma bubbles of the Milky Way | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
The anatomy of the Milky Way as seen in gamma light is full of mysteries. For example, there are gigantic bubbles of unknown origin above and below the centre of the Milky Way that emit a lot of this high-energy radiation. A new method for imaging, developed at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, now divided the Galactic gamma-radiation into three fundamental components: radiation from point sources, radiation from reactions of energetic protons with dense cold gas clouds, and radiation from electrons scattering light in the thin, hot, Galactic gas. The anatomic insights gained unravel some Galactic mysteries. Thus, it appears that the gamma-ray bubbles are simply outflows of ordinary, hot gas.
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Newton's journal reveals seeds of plant biology

Newton's journal reveals seeds of plant biology | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Sir Isaac Newton's interest in botany extended well beyond the fabled apple falling from a tree - he also appears to have understood how water moves from roots to leaves over 200 years before botanists did.
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How Did Edgar Allan Poe Manage To Describe The Big Bang In 1848?

How Did Edgar Allan Poe Manage To Describe The Big Bang In 1848? | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
They mocked when Edgar Allan Poe published his prose poem "Eureka" in his last year of life, describing how the universe had begun with a single "primordial particle" that exploded outwards in "one instantaneous flash." But 80 years later,...
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Black holes do not exist where space and time do not exist, says new theory

Black holes do not exist where space and time do not exist, says new theory | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —The quintessential feature of a black hole is its 'point of no return,' or what is more technically called its event horizon. When anything—a star, a particle, or wayward human—crosses this horizon, the black hole's massive gravity pulls it in with such force that it is impossible ...
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Rosetta, the Comet, and the Science of Surprise - Out There

Rosetta, the Comet, and the Science of Surprise - Out There | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
There is a cliche you hear all the time when scientists describe their experiments: “We expect the unexpected,” or its jokier cousin, “If we knew what we were doing it wouldn’t be called research.” (That second one is often, but dubiously, attributed to Albert Einstein.) But like many cliches, this one is built on a …
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​The Origins of Life Could Be Buried on the Moon​

​The Origins of Life Could Be Buried on the Moon​ | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it

Life probably arose on Earth some 3.5 to 4 billion years ago, but all records of the momentous event have vanished—here on the Blue Marble, at least. Traces of our lost origin story might instead be buried on the Moon, according to new research published in the journal Astrobiology.

“Unlike the Earth, the Moon has been geologically quiet for billions of years, meaning there is a good chance these organic and volatile records remain relatively intact,” Richard Matthewman, the study’s lead author, told me.

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Skull sheds light on human-Neanderthal relationship

Skull sheds light on human-Neanderthal relationship | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
A partial skull, found in a cave in Israel, is shedding light on the pivotal moment in early human history when our species left Africa and encountered our close cousins the Neanderthals.
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A 3-D view of the Greenland Ice Sheet opens window on ice history

A 3-D view of the Greenland Ice Sheet opens window on ice history | Fragments of Science | Scoop.it
Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA's Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and...

Via Paulo Gervasio
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