Fossils
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Fossils of Prehistoric Giant Shark Found in Spanish Waters - Latin American Herald Tribune

Fossils of Prehistoric Giant Shark Found in Spanish Waters - Latin American Herald Tribune | Fossils | Scoop.it
Latin American Herald Tribune Fossils of Prehistoric Giant Shark Found in Spanish Waters Latin American Herald Tribune LAS PALMAS, Spain – The Spanish Oceanography Institute, or IEO, discovered in waters of the Canary Islands a large deposit of...
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Bone Thugs-N-Disharmony - Slate Magazine

Bone Thugs-N-Disharmony - Slate Magazine | Fossils | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine
Bone Thugs-N-Disharmony
Slate Magazine
A few years later, Leidy published a description of the most complete dinosaur skeleton yet found, sent to him in Philadelphia by an amateur collector at the marl pits near Haddonfield, N.J.
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Daisy the Dinosaur to Teach Coding - Class Tech Tips

Daisy the Dinosaur to Teach Coding - Class Tech Tips | Fossils | Scoop.it
A great app to support STEM education is Daisy the Dinosaur. Teach students the basics of coding by giving commands to the dinosaur as it moves across the screen. Whether your students are completi...

Via John Evans
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This Database Lets You 3D Print and Explore Thousands of Fossils

This Database Lets You 3D Print and Explore Thousands of Fossils | Fossils | Scoop.it

 

Fossils are three dimensional objects, but you aren’t really supposed to touch them, and you can’t see their depth and detail very easily over the internet.

 


Via Andre Bontems
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Dinosaur Eggs Found In Portugal Linked To Rare Jurassic-Era Torvosaurus Nest - Huffington Post

Dinosaur Eggs Found In Portugal Linked To Rare Jurassic-Era Torvosaurus Nest - Huffington Post | Fossils | Scoop.it
DigitalJournal.com
Dinosaur Eggs Found In Portugal Linked To Rare Jurassic-Era Torvosaurus Nest
Huffington Post
Because they are so delicate, dinosaur eggs are a relatively rare find.
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Amphibian weighing half a tonne burrowed underground to survive extreme droughts 230 million years ago

Amphibian weighing half a tonne burrowed underground to survive extreme droughts 230 million years ago | Fossils | Scoop.it
The burrowing behaviour of Metoposaurus was recently discovered by researchers at University of Opole in Poland and the University of Bonn in Germany.
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The First 3D Database of Fossils, Which You Can Even Print

The First 3D Database of Fossils, Which You Can Even Print | Fossils | Scoop.it

To improve their online visuals and connect a number of museum collections, the British Geological Service launched the first database of 3D fossils last week.As often the only remnant we have from long vanished species, fossils are pretty awesome. But as generally drab-colored, heavy forms often hacked out of rock, the digital view doesn’t treat them too kindly. To improve their online visuals and connect a number of museum collections, the British Geological Survey launched the first database of 3D fossils last week.Fossil in 3DFossil in 3DCalled GB3D Type Fossils Online (shortening Great Britain and 3D into a catchy, or at least quickly written, acronym), the database includes not just hi-res images for thousands of fossils from previously separate British collections, but also 3D images you can view with 3D glasses, as well as 3D models that you can manipulate in your screen to rotate to all angles (provided you have HTML5). The project is a collaboration between BGS and the National Museum Cardiff, Sedgwick Museum of Earth Science, Oxford University Museum of Natural History, and the Geological Curators’ Group, offering an essential linked database for fossils that were previously divided by distance and databases.You’re even able to print out the 3D models if you so desire, and in conjunction with the database a contest is currently underway to spot 3D printed fossils among the real ones in 18 museums around the country. Your prize is a tablet loaded, naturally, with a bunch of 3D fossil images.


Via Annie Theunissen
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The largest fish that ever lived

The largest fish that ever lived | Fossils | Scoop.it

An international team of scientists has uncovered the remains of the world's largest fish. The 50ft Leedsichthys problematicus swam the oceans of the Jurassic era more than 160m years ago, sweeping up shoals of plankton through giant, mesh-covered gills. Leedsichthys was eventually wiped out by the same catastrophe that killed the dinosaurs 66m years ago.

 

The discovery by the team – led by Professor Jeff Liston of the National Museums of Scotland – is intriguing because it reveals that just as dinosaurs on land were going through major changes which saw the appearance of animals of vast dimensions – creatures that included Diplodocus, Apatosaurus and Brachiosaurus – reptiles in the sea had also started to grow to vast proportions in the Jurassic.

 

"The process is known as gigantism," said Liston. "It was known about in land animals at the time but we had no way of knowing if a parallel process occurred in the oceans. We now know that it did – though the reason for appearance of these gigantic beasts, both on land and in the water, is not clear at present."

 

Pieces of Leedsichthys fossils were first found by the British collector Alfred Leeds in 1889. Similar remains were subsequently found at other sites, from northern Germany to Normandy, Mexico and the Atacama desert in Chile. However, knowledge of the fish remained sketchy because of the poor quality of these finds. Leedsichthys had a skeleton that was mostly made of cartilage and which does not fossilise easily. This paucity of evidence and lack of clarity about its dimensions led to the fish being given its second name: problematicus.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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