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VIDDING: Alohomora (Harry Potter Remix)

VID de POG feito para o projeto  'Alohomora'; remix de sons e imangens gravadas do filme   'Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone'.


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Eliana Oliveira Burian's insight:

For Harry Potter Lovers!

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HarperCollins omits Israel from maps for Mideast schools, citing ‘local preferences’

HarperCollins omits Israel from maps for Mideast schools, citing ‘local preferences’ | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"For months, publishing giant HarperCollins has been selling an atlas it says was developed specifically for schools in the Middle East. It trumpets the work as providing students an 'in-depth coverage of the region and its issues.  Its stated goals include helping kids understand the 'relationship between the social and physical environment, the region’s challenges [and] its socio-economic development.' Nice goals. But there’s one problem: Israel is missing."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 9:41 AM

In other words, Israel got eliminated from this atlas that was designed to cater to Middle Eastern countries that take umbrage with the fact that Israel...exists.  Making maps always has political overtones and the company is now realizing that you can't please everyone with different versions for distinct audiences.  Now, HarperCollins has pulled the book and will pulp all remaining versions of the atlas.  


Tags: Israel, social media, political, mapping, cartography.

Sabah's curator insight, January 8, 10:36 AM

I think that this interesting, and it reminds of how in map head it said that google earth puts borders in different places for different countries to avoid contreversy

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:11 PM

unit 1!

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Would You Guess There Are Fewer Amish Today? You'd Be So Wrong

Would You Guess There Are Fewer Amish Today? You'd Be So Wrong | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"There’s no denying that the Amish are fascinating to the rest of us ("the English," in Amish terms).  We buy their furniture and jam, and may occasionally spot their buggies when driving on country roads through America’s heartland.  Many may not realize, however, that though the Amish make up only a tiny percentage of Americans (less than 0.1 percent), the Amish population has grown enormously since the early 1960s, with much of the increase occurring in the last two decades." 

 

Tags:  population, USA, folk cultures, culture, religion. 


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 5:05 PM

I am surprised that there is an increase in the Amish population.  I find the reality shows about the Amish poor viewing.  Especially that goofy show Amish Mafia.  That is the worst show ever.  Why has there been an increase in the last two decades?  Are they worried about their population?  Is it an unstated rule in their society to produce X amount of offspring?  How long can they continue to keep the outside world out or at a distance?  

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:14 PM

I've been to "Amish Country" in Pennsylvania a couple times, most recently in 2011 on a band trip in high school. We got to tour an Amish farm house that was moved and recreated in a more modern area, specifically right next to a Target (The entrance was in the parking lot of the Target, something I couldn't help but laugh about.) I found it very interesting to learn about their culture and why they do things a certain way. I asked one of the docents if they get many converts and she said they don't but she has heard of a couple of cases. 

After that response, I was kind of surprised to read this article and find out that their community is growing, especially at such exponential rates. The family size theory though is very believable. For a community that uses farming and crafts as their main source of income, a large number of hands would be needed to help sustain the family. 

Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 15, 12:41 PM

Summary- According to this graph, it is evident that many more Amish are here today than ever before. Even though this map only displays settlements(484), more than 1 person can be living in a settlement meaning there is a lot more Amish than you would think. amish make up less then 0.1 percent of our population just showing how many people actually live in America.

 

Insight- The amish religion is growing exponentially, especially in the last two decades. (1964 - 2014). Being a folk culture, they are relativly large. They amish do not exploit their religion because of this reason as well, but with they growing population many people are taking notice of them. 

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-stan by your land

Central Asia is full of lands whose names end in -stan. A certain powerful North American country has a related name. How? It's not your standard explanation...

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 2, 11:37 PM

"Stan" is the persian term for "country." Also, it's a term for where people live as these countries are named after Kazaks, Uzbeks, Turkmens, Kyrgyz, Tajiks, Afghans and Pakis. Also, Iran has 5 different provinces that end in the term "stan" plus the many other regions around central. However, I don't understand why Iran wouldn't call itself "Iranistan." To sum it up, these 7 countries that end in the term "stan" are part of the persian empire and these countries' names were originated by persians.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 4, 10:31 PM

When I was watching this video I learned a lot about -stan, how central asia has many lands that end in -stan. The ending -stan can relate to many things such as a stallion, steed, stable , stay  and stay and other things that helps the viewer and audience relate to their world and things around them.  I found out that Pakistan is named " land of the pure."

The united States is also a -stan as told in this video, starting with the Great Plains area. The stans actually abounded under the rule of the Russians and the Soviets.

This is an interesting video that I believe people should watch because you learn a lot about Central Asia as well as how North America relates because of -stan.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 6:29 PM

Never knew that -stan had so much meaning in so many parts of the world.  Very interesting to see how far back its meaning dates and how it comes to play in modern Central Asia.  The making of the name for Pakistan is also very interesting.

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The Globemaker

"A short film about Peter Bellerby, artisan globemaker and founder of Bellerby and Co. Globemakers.  Directed by Charles Arran Busk & Jamie McGregor Smith."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 12, 2:27 PM

Yes, these globes are precise archives filled with geospatial data and locational information--however, that pales in comparison to the artistic brilliance of the globes. These hand-crafted globes are truly works of art.  Marvel at the merger of mathematical precision and artistic design that makes a globe such as these a cartographic gem.   If anybody want to get me a Christmas present, you know that I love cartographic gifts.     


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 13, 8:26 AM

Un short film sobre Peter Bellerby, artesano fabricante de globos terráqueos y fundador de Bellerby and Co.Globemakers dirigida por Charles Arran Busk & Jamie McGregor Smith.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 13, 11:57 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

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The ‘Quiet Chernobyl’: The Aral Sea

The ‘Quiet Chernobyl’: The Aral Sea | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"Prior to the 1960’s, the Aral Sea was the fourth largest lake and approximately the size of Ireland. Fed by both the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers carrying snowmelt from the mountains to the southeast, the Aral Sea moderated the climate and provided a robust fishing industry that straddled the present-day border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. For the map savvy, that Aral Sea would be almost unrecognizable—it has long appeared as two basins known as the North and the South Aral Sea since the rivers were diverted for crops, leading to the Aral Sea’s alarming shrinkage. Recent NASA satellite imagery shows the decline that the Aral Sea has undergone since 2000, leaving the South Aral Sea completely dried up in 2014. "

 

Tags: podcast, Maps 101, historical, environment, Central Asia, environment modify, Aral Sea.


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After 522 Years, Spain Seeks To Make Amends For Expulsion Of Jews

After 522 Years, Spain Seeks To Make Amends For Expulsion Of Jews | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Spain's monarchy decimated the Jewish population by expelling, killing or forcibly converting Jews in 1492. Now the country may offer their descendants Spanish citizenship.

 

Tags: Europe, migration, Israel, Spain.


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Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 7:29 PM

Can we all agree that a 522 year apology is outdated? Honestly, Karavani, a citizen of Israel who benefits from the new policy, summarized my reaction to this when he stated, “I don't think that anybody owes me anything — definitely [not] if it happened 500 years ago.” The people involved in this situation are dead five times over at least. I think it is time to move on and if you can’t, then you have bigger issues in your life. Personally, it would make more sense for the government to remember past mistakes and learn from them by applying knowledge of discrimination to any issues of discrimination that is currently happening in the country.

 

I kept wondering if giving citizenship so many years later would actually be seen as a justice apology. The citizens aren’t being recognized as Jews. Plus the expense being incurred to even take the test sounds unpleasant given some of the complaints mentioned in the article. I didn’t realize that a large amount of the Israel population would actually leave for Europe. Upon realizing this, I found the trend to be amazing in a world where increased immigration is normally seen in a negative light for the nation who is welcoming the immigrants. Never did I realize that a member of Israel would view it as “a European way — to destroy this country.” I do doubt that was there intent as there are far more effective way to destroy a nation. Yet, when someone is losing a large amount of their population (some of whom speak an almost dead language) I can see how the statement was made. I guess this member of the Israeli population would be considered a person against globalization in this instance.

 

Leaving Israel isn’t a bad decision though. Given the instability in Israel, I think it is great that more immigrants can go someplace else. Furthermore, I think it provides a fantastic opportunity to people, like Karavani, who want better jobs. While it might be sad to see such drastic change for Levy, people can study like his cousin and keep their heritage. The world is a bigger place now that is easily traversed. I think people needed to realize there is no longer one absolute location to live and that isn’t the end of the world. It is just a new way of life.   

Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 16, 9:09 PM

Summary- After almost 550 years, Spain is finally allowing decedents of expelled Jew citizenship. In 1492 Jews were forced to convert, be killed, or flee Spain. A law now grants the Jews descendants citizenship under a draft law by the Spanish Government. 

 

Insight- As explorers of religion in this unit, we ask out selves: Why were the Jews expelled and now let back in so long after? The expulsion was caused by the Spanish Inquisition, a goal to maintain catholic orthodox in spanish kingdoms forcing all Jews out. They are finally let back in after Spain realized  that there is now no reason to keep other people out.

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:25 PM

Unit 3:

Spain debating whether or not they are going to let Jewish people apply to be Spanish citizens. 

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Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day

Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 10:39 AM

Last year, Julie and I wrote this article for Maps 101 (which was also created into a podcast) about the historical and geographic significance of Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights movement.  Martin Luther King fought racial segregation, which, if you think about it, is a geographic system of oppression that uses space and place to control populations. Derek Alderman and Jerry Mitchell, excellent educators and researchers, produced lesson plans to help students investigate the politics behind place naming, specifically using the case study of the many streets named after Martin Luther King.  


Questions to Ponder: Why are streets named after Martin Luther King found in certain places and not in others? What forces and decisions likely drive these patterns? What is the historical legacy of Martin Luther King and how is it a part of certain cultural landscapes? 


Tags: seasonal, race, historical, the South, political, toponyms, landscape.

Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 7:01 PM

Interesting and different way to view MLK.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 24, 7:27 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

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Name That Grid!

Name That Grid! | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 12:06 AM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this one that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         


Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

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III Colóquio Luso-Brasileiro de Educação a Distância e Elearning ...

III Colóquio Luso-Brasileiro de Educação a Distância e Elearning ... | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Also inspiring was Marco Silva's presentation that introduced his view on useful uses of computer and the internet in education separating distance learning from online (or networked) learning. This idea goes side by side with ...
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III Colóquio Luso-Brasileiro de Educação a Distância e Elearning ...

III Colóquio Luso-Brasileiro de Educação a Distância e Elearning ... | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Also inspiring was Marco Silva's presentation that introduced his view on useful uses of computer and the internet in education separating distance learning from online (or networked) learning. This idea goes side by side with ...
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Fair Housing

Fair Housing | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:50 PM

This hour-long podcast addresses some has key issues in urban geography by exploring the history of redlining, the Fair Housing Act and other fair housing initiatives.  The urban cultural mosaic of the United States and the neighborhoods of our cities have been greatly shaped by these issues.   Currently gentrification is reshaping many U.S. cities and fits into the wider scope of the issues raised in the podcast.


Tags: housingracism, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood, ethnicity, race, podcast.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 3:54 AM

this podcast can gives us insight into other peoples experiences and decision making processes in choosing were to live and how that effects life for them. Depending on where we live rent may be cheaper but also living conditions and employment may not be all that great. Gentrification or community improvement also shows us, this renovating process helps change our old neighborhoods and tries to create better places for people to life, it speaks about fair housing and the various experiences that people have in the American way of living.

Mrs. B's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:44 PM

PODCAST FOR URBAN UNIT

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The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, Washington DC.


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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 19, 4:18 PM

Gentrification is an interesting concept. Here in Austin we are seeing these signs all over the city. In a growing cities with growing economies the outskirts of the cities are being built up and expanding to allow for their growth. Gentrification is a very common event today, especially in places like Austin with thriving economies. However it often displaces a lot of the population with roots in that area. Its often considered a controversial topic, but is rarely talked about because of it complexity and the fact that it is often viewed as a very good thing. Unit 2 Population 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 22, 8:48 PM

7) Uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification

This article was written by a woman who noticed a lot of changes in Washington D.C. Gentrification led to these many changes, by becoming not as unique and urbanizing at other people's expense. She describes gentrification as remodeling very quickly and ferociously. A lot of the things she says are for the general good of the people, like installing street lights, but don't take into consideration the people who don't appreciate the changes. Stores like walmart are taking over the family owned stores, and more people are moving in. 

This article describes gentrification perfectly, and I like her pictures to go along with it. I think this would help introduce this vocab term to new students. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 12:29 AM

Sadly, gentrification happens all across the world. Poor populations in cities are disadvantaged and often have to move out due to wealthier populations moving in. One of the signs I found most disturbing was that police will start patrolling the areas where wealthier and poorer populations mix. This is a sad reality. Police do this to ensure that crime rates are low as poor people would be more tempted to commit crimes in wealthier neighborhoods. I do think this police patrolling has racist roots since the poorer population in Washington D.C. is mostly black. Words like "renewal" and "redevelopment" hide the sad reality behind gentrification/

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Brazil and Europe

Brazil and Europe | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 11, 6:56 PM

This is a funny map to look at. It takes the country of Brazil and places all of Europe inside of it! I never realized Brazil was so big and it puts that into perspective when its equivalent to all of Europe like this. You do not think about Brazil being this big just because it is on a different continent than Europe but I liked looking at it this way.

NatalBrazil's curator insight, February 17, 10:53 AM

Interesting Graphic about Brazil and Europe

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 19, 8:53 PM

That is a whole lot of potential culture in one country.  

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Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk

Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola got a lot of attention in November when it announced it was going into the milk business. In fact, its extra-nutritious milk product was invented by some dairy farmers in Indiana.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:25 PM

unit 5

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 5:11 PM

As the main producer of certain crops and hogs, the state of Indiana has been chosen by Coca-Cola to spearhead a new innovative project regarding an improved flavor of milk in the future. Indiana’s prime location and abundance of raw materials positively contributed to the decision to establish the project’s headquarters in this state. As a result, it is expected that this innovation will boost Indiana’s economy and create for jobs and advancements in technology. This project allows Coca-Cola the opportunity to expand its brand and offer healthier beverage options to the consumer.

Katie's curator insight, March 23, 11:34 PM

This article is about how coco cola is going into the milk business. There source for milk is from Fair Oaks Farm. This dairy is Americas one and only dairy theme park. I think this would be an example of large scale commercial agriculture and agribusiness.  

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Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale

Europe’s Empty Churches Go on Sale | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Hundreds of churches around Europe have closed or are threatened by plunging membership, posing a question for communities: What to do with the once-holy, now-empty buildings?

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Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 24, 8:01 AM

Summary- Hundreds of churches around Europe  are being closed and sold to other people. This is due to the lack of membership coming from the people that used to go there. People are turning these churches into various things such as skateparks. I think this is a very disrespectful act, turning a place of worship into a place to destroy. 

 

Insight- In Unit 3 religion is a big part. From this article, we can ask ourselves why the memberships of churches are declining. Do be just not care anymore? Are people moving away? Although the answer is no stated in this article, I think people there are just not as devoted to church as they used to be.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 8:09 PM

Europe’s Empty churches going on sale is not upsetting to me, unless they are being used as skateboard parks. The main reason to the church’s closings are a rise in secular beliefs. With less people attending and making tributes to the churches they are given no choice but to shut down. These are buildings of great archaic integrity and I think that they should be sold to museums or to state governments as holy sites or something to that effect. These buildings should be preserved because they are a giant standing living history of this world. But as of now skate ramps and parks occupy these churches and may be damaging them. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 7, 9:25 PM

Empty buildings now turned into just churches used for fun, or by the picture skateboarding. Europe is always known as the power house especially during their colonial period, when they colonized Africa and brought some of their religious beliefs towards the Africans. Europe is filled with big catholic traditions tracing back to the past, but now with this going on its a very sad state seeing something so significant in history in the European community go to waste..

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A Geographical Oddity


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 10, 1:39 PM

Partly just because I love this highly quotable movie with an incredible soundtrack, but this short clip from O Brother Where Art Thou? can start be a good conversation starter.  I'm hoping to use it when discussing relative location (or isolation) as well as the time-space compression.  Frequently, I ask my student how far away they live from campus and invariably they answer with a unit of time (even though distance was implied in the question). 


Questions to Ponder: Why do we often answer with a measurement of time when discussing distance?  What technologies are dependent on our temporal analysis of distance? How would our perception of distance change based on our access to transportation and communication technologies?


Tags: Time-Space Compression, location.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 11:34 AM

Why do we answer with a unit of time when asked a distance question?

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The Globemaker

"A short film about Peter Bellerby, artisan globemaker and founder of Bellerby and Co. Globemakers.  Directed by Charles Arran Busk & Jamie McGregor Smith."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 12, 2:27 PM

Yes, these globes are precise archives filled with geospatial data and locational information--however, that pales in comparison to the artistic brilliance of the globes. These hand-crafted globes are truly works of art.  Marvel at the merger of mathematical precision and artistic design that makes a globe such as these a cartographic gem.   If anybody want to get me a Christmas present, you know that I love cartographic gifts.     


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 13, 8:26 AM

Un short film sobre Peter Bellerby, artesano fabricante de globos terráqueos y fundador de Bellerby and Co.Globemakers dirigida por Charles Arran Busk & Jamie McGregor Smith.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 13, 11:57 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."


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God Is.'s curator insight, January 20, 7:49 AM

Interesting data in several different ways...Can draw different conclusions from this, and perhaps shed light on things that need to be modified/changed as it pertains to our belief... A balancing act of sorts...Thank you for curating this... Maybe it will help will cure certain beliefs we hold, individually, and collectively...

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 7:37 PM

It would make sense that Indonesia is one of the most religious countries in the world being that it has the highest Muslim population. Also, I never thought of Europe as being religious countries which is why I am not surprised that 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God needs to be moral. Another reason why I am not surprised is because they are more popular for their ethnic groups such as the french group, italian group and german group. Also, they don't have focused religions. For example, Buddhism was originated in Nepal and worshipped mostly in China, Hinduism was originated in India, Jewish was originated in Israel and Islam was originated in Saudi Arabia and it's practiced mostly in Indonesia and Pakistan. That explains why most parts of Asia (at least southern Asia) has practices specific religions.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 27, 11:58 PM

Summary- This figure explains the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. Only is Europe does God seem less important than the rest of the world. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study the distributions of many things, religion included. Why do so many poorer countries have a stronger faith in God than wealthier ones? It may be because if their ethnic backgrounds, but I think there is more to it. I think when a country is poorer, more people reach out to their God for help. I also think that in wealthier countries there are distractions from religion such as video games and other mass produced technologies that get in the way of people researching their faith.

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 8:09 AM

This video (like part 1) shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video) on these complex borders:


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.

harrison babbitt's curator insight, February 1, 2:09 PM

this correlates with unit 4 political geography because it is showing a nation state.

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


Via Seth Dixon, Eliana Oliveira Burian
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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

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Podcast: Columbus's Voyage

Podcast: Columbus's Voyage | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"This Geography News Network Article podcast is an historical description of Christopher Columbus's role in discovering the Americas."


Via Seth Dixon
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Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale

Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
A geographer and a biologist at Salem State University team up to curate a new exhibition, featuring confounding views from both satellites and microscopes

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Dean Haakenson's curator insight, October 17, 2013 6:15 PM

So cool!

Siri Anderson's curator insight, October 18, 2013 12:46 PM

Gives a whole new meaning to the sense of scale.

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 6:18 PM

Try your eyes at this!