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NatGeo's APHG page

NatGeo's APHG page | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Resources from National Geographic Education to support teachers and learners of the Advanced Placement Human Geography course.

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It's Worth knowing about it!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 20, 2012 9:10 AM

The National Geographic Education Foundation works to assist teachers to promote the status and quality of geography education.  In keeping with that mission they have recently revamped their AP Human Geography page, dividing all their resources according to the 7 major units of the course (in the "tags" section below, I have attempted to do the same):

  1. Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives
  2. Population
  3. Cultural Patterns and Processes
  4. Political Organization of Space
  5. Agriculture and Rural Land Use
  6. Industrialization and Economic Development
  7. Cities and Urban Land Use

Tags: APHG, unit 1, unit 2, unit 3, unit 4, unit 5, unit 6, unit 7.

Steven Sutantro's curator insight, December 20, 2012 8:31 PM

Useful tools for Geography Educators

From around the web

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III Colóquio Luso-Brasileiro de Educação a Distância e Elearning ...

III Colóquio Luso-Brasileiro de Educação a Distância e Elearning ... | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Also inspiring was Marco Silva's presentation that introduced his view on useful uses of computer and the internet in education separating distance learning from online (or networked) learning. This idea goes side by side with ...
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III Colóquio Luso-Brasileiro de Educação a Distância e Elearning ...

III Colóquio Luso-Brasileiro de Educação a Distância e Elearning ... | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Also inspiring was Marco Silva's presentation that introduced his view on useful uses of computer and the internet in education separating distance learning from online (or networked) learning. This idea goes side by side with ...
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Fair Housing

Fair Housing | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:50 PM

This hour-long podcast addresses some has key issues in urban geography by exploring the history of redlining, the Fair Housing Act and other fair housing initiatives.  The urban cultural mosaic of the United States and the neighborhoods of our cities have been greatly shaped by these issues.   Currently gentrification is reshaping many U.S. cities and fits into the wider scope of the issues raised in the podcast.


Tags: housingracism, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood, ethnicity, race, podcast.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 3:54 AM

this podcast can gives us insight into other peoples experiences and decision making processes in choosing were to live and how that effects life for them. Depending on where we live rent may be cheaper but also living conditions and employment may not be all that great. Gentrification or community improvement also shows us, this renovating process helps change our old neighborhoods and tries to create better places for people to life, it speaks about fair housing and the various experiences that people have in the American way of living.

Mrs. B's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:44 PM

PODCAST FOR URBAN UNIT

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The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Remembering Wilbur Zelinksy

Remembering Wilbur Zelinksy | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"Later this week, there will be a memorial service on the Penn State campus (Oct 26th-see details here)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:21 PM

This summer I unexpectedly found myself at the estate sale of the great cultural geographer, Wilbur Zelinsky.  I heard earlier through the Penn State geography department that he had passed away, but was startled to find myself discussing his legacy with his children.  This picture (that was being held up by the most amazing magnet ever) on his filing cabinet seems like a perfect tribute to his intellectual legacy.  Read the full article with additional pictures here.

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, October 21, 2013 4:13 AM
this is a general fact: "This was when I realized that young academics always make a name for themselves by standing on the shoulders of giants; some choose then to look down on their predecessors while others acknowledge that their work is dependent on those who came before. " congratulations for this analysis of human beings attitudes...Scientists are human after all
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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

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Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 11:24 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

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World's Most Thrilling Airports

World's Most Thrilling Airports | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:02 PM

Amazing !!!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:09 AM

Most people are scared enough to even go on a plan much less having to deal with some of these runways. This horrid runways include high altitude, short runways or even 90 degree turns to even advance onto the runway. Pretty scary if i might say so myself. Im surprised the St Maartens runways didn make the list with its threat of hitting a popular beach in the local proximity.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:02 PM

Some of these airports look to me as if planes won't make it. The one in Portugal goes over mountains and trees and is very short. Flying can be terrifying as it is but landing on some of these airport can be more nerve racking. This raises a question, was this the only land area these countries had to build a runway? 

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 1:07 PM

As Bangkok, Thailand is slotted to be one of the up an coming biggest cities in the world it puts Thailand on the map.  People see that the clothes they wear were made in Thailand and we think of a sweatshop in a far east country where children are laboring away for long hours making little money.  Although this was true in the past, we see now that it isn't like that.   These cities are where a lot of people are crammed together and live, yes, but also full of people who are looking forward to a better life.  These people have hope in the future of the city that they live in and are ready to invest in the future.  When comes the time that a majority of people will live in cities these cities such as Bangkok will already be developed and thriving, a major plus for the people already living and working here. 

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Youth TechCamps

Youth TechCamps | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2013 10:20 PM

The AAG has requested that I share this with geography educators and I'm delighted to do so because this is fantastic program; please encourage students to apply for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.  "This program aims to provide opportunities for youth to learn more about online geospatial technologies and how to apply them in service to their communities, while gaining a deeper understanding about different places and cultures of the world.  It is conducted by the Association of American Geographers (AAG) with funding and support from the US Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Youth Programs Division. The MyCOE partnership has actively led more than ten years of youth leadership programs, finding solutions to sustainable development challenges in local communities using geographic concepts and tools, while connecting with each other globally." 

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 31, 2013 12:11 PM

This is an amazing opportunity for high school students to network build relationships and glean knowledsge and learn ways to plug into their community and their world around them. This allows students to learn more about geographic technolgies to understand mapping and climate changes and would be an amazing opportuinty for students to find their vocation and find ways to plug into people who work in their communities and it seems though that the school is only available in Bolivia Panama and South Africa. We need more students that are more aware geograhically and able to meet the needs in a changing global climate.

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Changes in the APHG course


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 31, 2013 10:31 AM

HUGGERS...this will affect YOU! Take a look!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 5:16 PM

Take a look HUGGERS!

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 8:29 PM

course info-- 2 AP conferences in the last year and this was not mentioned!

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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 11:42 AM

With health nuts discovering Quinoa the demand for this protein packed weight loss grain is quickly increasing throughout the world it is hard to keep up with supply.  Quinoa is typically grown in the Andes Mountains, limiting the area of which it can be grown.  The increase in demand for this superfood is also affecting the locals who used this as an item in their daily meals.  With production down and demand up the price is on the rise, even for those locals who had enjoyed this grain for relatively cheap for a good amount of time. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 4, 2:20 PM

Quinoa has a seen an explosion of popularity on international markets due to its healthy nature, simple preparation, and culinary versatility. While its increased trade has helped bring more money to the farmers and the region, it has also made the price of quinoa too high for many of the locals. To limit the availability of such a staple food to the locals could have many detrimental effects. It shows how expanding into the global arena can have good economic effect for some, it can still undermine other parts of the already established economy.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 12:15 PM

Quinoa has gone from a traditional food only consumed by those living in the Andes Mountains to a global phenomenon. Historically, Quinoa was consumed by locals in the Andes Mountains in order to supplement their diet. Recently, it has developed a reputation as a super food, with people claiming that it can help lose weight and has tremendous health benefits. While this may be true, food fads such as this have the potential to greatly affect the historic growers. Since its boom on the global market, Quinoa has become incredibly expensive. The people that once depended on it for sustenance can no longer afford it, thus leading to economic and food issues in these localities. It is important to understand that these exotic, popular foods can maim entire ways of life where the foods were once just foods, and not super foods. 

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Geographically Yours

Geographically Yours | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"If an urban population demands the freshest vegetables, they should be produced within a 24-hour field-to-table delivery zone.  What, therefore, should be the highest and best use of agricultural land between Taiwan's two largest cities, Taipei and Kaoshiung, only 200 miles apart?  The Lord of the Rings, a.k.a., Johan Heinrich Von Thünen, has the answer."  [2011]


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 5, 2013 4:02 PM

This image and analysis comes from the blog "Geographically Yours" by Don Zeigler.  He's a well-traveled cultural geographer and has been collecting great teaching images over his career and is now sharing them on this site.  These pictures are great discussion starters and bell ringers to start the day.


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG, images.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:13 AM

This image communicates the importance of agriculture and marketplace relativity. in an area where transportation is minimal and people happen to be more more poorer then need to supply needed resources in a timely manner is very important. Farmers and resource providers need to be close enough geographically. This image shows an outside clothing and food market were people get to shop around and choose in a convientent ways there most needed items. The umbrella suggests rain as the child and other shoppers are being covered. This outdoor market doesnt necessarily suggest poverty but a wide range of population given a convenient location to buy goods quikcly and efficiently. The market may be located in a urban downtown area or also a village central area. Regardless the location, and goods provided shows the valuable commodities need to be provided in a manner, freshest possible for delivery.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 13, 2013 8:40 AM

It is said that locally grown food can have more nutritional value than organic if the latter comes from thousands of miles away. If you had to choose, which would you rather have, locally grown or organic? 

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

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Podcast: Columbus's Voyage

Podcast: Columbus's Voyage | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"This Geography News Network Article podcast is an historical description of Christopher Columbus's role in discovering the Americas."


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Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale

Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
A geographer and a biologist at Salem State University team up to curate a new exhibition, featuring confounding views from both satellites and microscopes

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Dean Haakenson's curator insight, October 17, 2013 6:15 PM

So cool!

Siri Anderson's curator insight, October 18, 2013 12:46 PM

Gives a whole new meaning to the sense of scale.

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 6:18 PM

Try your eyes at this!

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Salem Witch Trials Podcast

Salem Witch Trials Podcast | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 2013 3:02 PM

With Halloween right around the corner, the Salem Witch trials loom large in the collective American psyche.  While many emphasize the supernatural and the scandalous, this Maps 101 podcast (based on the article written by Julie Dixon and yours truly) gives the geographic and historic context to understand the tragedy of the 1692 witch trials.


Tags: seasonal, historical, colonialism.

Mohamed Maktoub's curator insight, October 21, 2013 6:20 AM

لوحة  عظيمة  مثل صاحبها 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:37 PM

The outbreak of the Salem Witch Trials really are really something that produces many questions. Perhaps the most obvious question is why did these trials happen all of a sudden? A community largely based off of agriculture produces an atmosphere of superstition. This can be seen in the events that led up to the Salem witch trials. With the land barely producing enough to sustain the town, people look for a scapegoat to blame. Neighbors turned on neighbors in order to obtain more land claiming that each other were witches. It is interesting to see that in a time of crisis one can a helping hand is not always the popular choice; as seen in the Salem Witch Trials the opposite extreme is taken place. 

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All the Countries of the World

Full album & lyrics: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats-2 Music by Renald Francoeur, Drawing by Craighton Berman, Video by Don Markus "Tour the ...

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Marina Costanzo's curator insight, November 7, 2013 5:42 AM

Geograficamente parlando!!

Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:28 AM

The chorus gets a little old, but I dare you not to like this video.

Debriez22's curator insight, July 24, 10:57 PM

:)

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Geography in the News: Pumpkins

Geography in the News: Pumpkins | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

"Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside stands. Jack o’lanterns, decorative displays and pumpkin pies are the main destinies of most pumpkins in the United States. Elsewhere in the world, however, the pumpkin is nearly exclusively considered a food crop or animal feed."


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:25 PM

I have been a long-time fan of pumpkin coffee, and tomorrow I will probably have some with my cousins and family... Some areas of Asia allow consumption of dogs, other areas of the US allow consumption of roadkill, and that is different from what most people in RI are used to... So I guess, it's not really my business what other people and countries do with their pumpkin crops, as long as it doesn't negatively affect other people.  My neighbor has won some prizes, I think 3rd place in RI for largest pumpkin contests, which is pretty cool, because for several months, you can see their pumpkin garden from my backyard.  Those pumpkins are enormous, and made me wonder if there was anything being done to make the modified pumpkins more usable in food.  I know GMOs are a touchy issue, but to feed the starving people around the world, you have to wonder if one pumpkin at 2000 lbs could feed a village of people.  Lots of people that don't like GMOs probably do unhealthy things in other ways, so their huge activism movements really boggle me.  Labeling GMOs is one thing, but stopping genetic modifications seems as controversial as starting them, especially when some people can benefit from them.  Whatever, I guess pumpkins are cool for whatever people want to do with them, including smashing them... this week on RIC's campus I saw a smashed pumpkin.  The only thing that really popped into my head was not "what a waste," or "oh, those delinquents," but rather "that seems fun."  I did assume though, that no one was hurt by the smashing of the pumpkin...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 5:14 PM

Although you wouldn't think it there are many different countries and specific regions that demonstrate the perfect cropping land and fertilization process to grow pumpkins. Out of the US power house pumpkin growing Illinois is named number 1. Along side California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvainnia, Mississippi. But lets travel abroad to Africa, now me personally I wouldnt think that there are alot of pumpkin patches in Africa but there are many different places in Africa that pumpkins are grown. SOme of these places are Egypt with (690,000) and then there is South Africa with (378,776). I found these numbers quite interesting because one wouldn't think that there are pumpkin patches in Africa.

Pamela Shields's curator insight, August 29, 10:10 AM

@Danyl †  so inspirational!

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Assessing Online Sources

Assessing Online Sources | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

Tweet from Earth Pics (screenshot preserved for when it gets taken down).  Retweeted over 1,000 times in the first hour.


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:57 AM

students need to be very careful in the type of sources that they used to glean information. People can manipulate photos and suggest things as fact when they are completetly made up. It is understandable that Wikipedia can not be used as an entireyl reliable source because people have access to add whatever they want to the content matter. Photoshop and other online tools can be used to trick people into beleiving certain things. This photo claiming to be from ireland is really from Thailand is a small island but the castle itself on the top os photoshoped and the image was retweeded like crazy within the first hor. wee must check our sources and make sure that we are getting good primary or at least good secondary services from legit websites.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:08 PM

This just shows that you can't believe everything you see on the internet. In this picture it is said to be of an island in Ireland but in reality it is in Thailand. People believe what they want to believe.

morgan knight's curator insight, October 8, 1:00 PM

Before reading this article, I assumed that I was capable of telling fictional from factual information apart. But now, after having my eyes opened, I realize that the internet can truly play you like a puppet. From this article, I've now learned that there are more ways than one to judge the authenticity of a site. one such way is to search for an "original" copy of whatever it may be that you're researching. If none pop up, you have the true article.

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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

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Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 6:06 PM

Interesting data!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:35 PM

No surprise here that the countries that are more well off generally have less of a gender gap. One thing that i like to point out about this article is that the united states came in 23rd which i think is pretty humerous since we pride outselfs on our rights and equality but were not even in the top 20 countries in the world when it comes down to equality between genders. The biggest surprise of this article though has to be nicaragua coming in 10th even though every country around it scored poorly. hopefully the nicaraguans can teach their fellow costa ricans and houndurans how to close the gap.

xavia's comment, April 10, 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
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Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

Rescooped by Eliana Oliveira Burian from Geography Education
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Maldives

Maldives | formação continuada online para professores de inglês | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:48 PM

Boy would I love to visit the Maldives. What an interesting and beautiful island it is.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 5:36 PM

Volcanic activity created the formation of coral reefs, which have sustained the development of larger Islands, including the Maldives. Due to pollution, the westernized Maldives have lost much of their bio-diversity, so indigenous people who always rely on fish for basic  survival are having problems. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 10:21 PM

With sea levels rising the Maldives will be under water relatively soon. This will leave all those people either dead or as refugees. There needs to be an effort to find out what to do with all those people because it is too late to stop the seas from rising.

Rescooped by Eliana Oliveira Burian from Geography Education
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17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:53 AM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Mrs. K's curator insight, August 27, 6:41 AM

2G Contemporary Period