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Rescooped by Eliana Oliveira Burian from Geography Education!

Name That Grid!

Name That Grid! | formação continuada online para professores de inglês |

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 12:06 AM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this one that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

Rescooped by Eliana Oliveira Burian from Geography Education!

Fair Housing

Fair Housing | formação continuada online para professores de inglês |
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:50 PM

This hour-long podcast addresses some has key issues in urban geography by exploring the history of redlining, the Fair Housing Act and other fair housing initiatives.  The urban cultural mosaic of the United States and the neighborhoods of our cities have been greatly shaped by these issues.   Currently gentrification is reshaping many U.S. cities and fits into the wider scope of the issues raised in the podcast.

Tags: housingracism, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood, ethnicity, race, podcast.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 3:54 AM

this podcast can gives us insight into other peoples experiences and decision making processes in choosing were to live and how that effects life for them. Depending on where we live rent may be cheaper but also living conditions and employment may not be all that great. Gentrification or community improvement also shows us, this renovating process helps change our old neighborhoods and tries to create better places for people to life, it speaks about fair housing and the various experiences that people have in the American way of living.

Mrs. B's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:44 PM


Rescooped by Eliana Oliveira Burian from Geography Education!

NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | formação continuada online para professores de inglês |

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."

Via Seth Dixon
Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 9:38 PM

I thought this article was good as it gave information on how the world as we know it is growing and cities are popping up everywhere. Developing countries are seeing a large increase in growth and with that comes the growth of cities. With this, more megacities will be born and hopefully the quality of life increases with life in cities.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 6:08 AM

mega cities

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 6:09 AM

mega cities

Rescooped by Eliana Oliveira Burian from Geography Education!

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | formação continuada online para professores de inglês |
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, Washington DC.

Via Seth Dixon
Emily Bian's curator insight, March 22, 8:48 PM

7) Uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification

This article was written by a woman who noticed a lot of changes in Washington D.C. Gentrification led to these many changes, by becoming not as unique and urbanizing at other people's expense. She describes gentrification as remodeling very quickly and ferociously. A lot of the things she says are for the general good of the people, like installing street lights, but don't take into consideration the people who don't appreciate the changes. Stores like walmart are taking over the family owned stores, and more people are moving in. 

This article describes gentrification perfectly, and I like her pictures to go along with it. I think this would help introduce this vocab term to new students. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 12:29 AM

Sadly, gentrification happens all across the world. Poor populations in cities are disadvantaged and often have to move out due to wealthier populations moving in. One of the signs I found most disturbing was that police will start patrolling the areas where wealthier and poorer populations mix. This is a sad reality. Police do this to ensure that crime rates are low as poor people would be more tempted to commit crimes in wealthier neighborhoods. I do think this police patrolling has racist roots since the poorer population in Washington D.C. is mostly black. Words like "renewal" and "redevelopment" hide the sad reality behind gentrification/

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 25, 9:36 PM

I believe this article is very interesting because it shows how gentrification can change a neighborhood. I believe gentrification is a little bit of a negative thing because it adds geographical uniformity to our modern society and yes that could be good thing in measure. The article states now police patrol every street, Walmart's and 7-11's start showing up, areas will start becoming more aesthetically pleasing, but is that really a good thing? I believe that sometimes while you are driving by it is better to have a change in your surrounding, rather than seeing the same thing over and over again even if it is more modern.

Rescooped by Eliana Oliveira Burian from Geography Education!

17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:53 AM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Mrs. Karnowski-Simul's curator insight, August 27, 2014 6:41 AM

2G Contemporary Period

Rescooped by Eliana Oliveira Burian from Geography Education!

The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | formação continuada online para professores de inglês |
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.