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The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert | forests | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Kolbert is a staff writer at The New Yorker. She is the author of The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History and Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change
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Subsidies to industries that cause deforestation worth 100 times more than aid to prevent it

Subsidies to industries that cause deforestation worth 100 times more than aid to prevent it | forests | Scoop.it
Brazil and Indonesia paid over $40bn in subsidies to industries that drive rainforest destruction between 2009 and 2012 - compared to $346m in conservation aid they received to protect forests, according to new research
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Ferns Get It On After 60 Million Years Apart

Ferns Get It On After 60 Million Years Apart | forests | Scoop.it
An unassuming little fern has left scientists scratching their heads at the feat of reproductive hijinks it apparently represents.

The fern, xCystocarpium roskamianum (the prefix 'x' indicates ...
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11 Natural Wonders to See Before They Are Gone [Slide Show]

11 Natural Wonders to See Before They Are Gone [Slide Show] | forests | Scoop.it
Global warming may transform these places beyond recognition
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Louisa ROQUE's curator insight, March 26, 1:15 PM

It's never too late to do something about it, is it?

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Malaria Parasite Attracts Mosquitoes With Perfume

Malaria Parasite Attracts Mosquitoes With Perfume | forests | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

The Plasmodium parasite uses an altered type of plant chloroplast to manufacture pine-and-lemon scented chemicals, which lure in the bloodsuckers. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Indonesia's REDD+ Agency to be swallowed by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry? | REDD-Monitor

Indonesia's REDD+ Agency to be swallowed by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry? | REDD-Monitor | forests | Scoop.it
Indonesia's REDD+ Agency might be reduced to a advisory board within the new Ministry of Environment and Forestry.
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Pleasure palace in Laos facilitates wildlife poaching for Chinese elites

Pleasure palace in Laos facilitates wildlife poaching for Chinese elites | forests | Scoop.it
A city-sized resort complex in Laos is facilitating large-scale wildlife trafficking for Chinese tourists, exacerbating commercial poaching in the Southeast Asian nation, warns a new report published by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA).
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Amazon rainforest losing capacity to soak up CO2

Amazon rainforest losing capacity to soak up CO2 | forests | Scoop.it
The Amazon rainforest may be approaching the limit of how much excess carbon dioxide it can capture from the atmosphere.
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The science behind the extraordinary vision of owls

The science behind the extraordinary vision of owls | forests | Scoop.it
What makes owl vision so special? Well for starters, they don't actually have eye balls.
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If Apes Go Extinct, So Could Entire Forests

If Apes Go Extinct, So Could Entire Forests | forests | Scoop.it
But what if there were no apes? A new study published February 27 in the journal Oryx found that many tree and plant species in the Democratic Republic of the Congo rely almost exclusively on bonobos for seed dispersal. In the LuiKotale forest, where the study was conducted, 18 plant species were completely unable to reproduce if their seeds did not first travel through a bonobo’s guts. According to the paper if the bonobos disappeared, the plants would also likely go extinct.
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New study argues the Anthropocene began in 1610

New study argues the Anthropocene began in 1610 | forests | Scoop.it
In 1610, William Shakespeare began penning one of his greatest plays, The Tempest, which some critics view as a commentary on European colonization of far-away islands and continents. Along those lines, a study today in Nature argues that 1610 is the first year of the human-dominated epoch, known as the Anthropocene, due to the upheavals caused by the 'discovery' of the New World.
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Genetic data can help predict how pine forests will cope with climate change

Genetic data can help predict how pine forests will cope with climate change | forests | Scoop.it
Data from only a small number of gene variants can predict which maritime pine trees are most vulnerable to climate change, scientists report. The results will improve computer models designed to forecast where forests will grow as the climate changes, and promises to help forestry managers decide where to focus reforestation efforts. The results will also guide the choice of tree stocks.
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Honey, I shrunk the ants: How environment controls size

Honey, I shrunk the ants: How environment controls size | forests | Scoop.it
Until now scientists have believed that the variations in traits -- such as our height, skin color, tendency to gain weight or not, intelligence, tendency to develop certain diseases, etc., all of them traits that exist along a continuum -- were a result of both genetic and environmental factors. But they didn't know how exactly these things worked together. By studying ants, researchers have identified a key mechanism by which environmental (or epigenetic) factors influence the expression of all of these traits, along with many more.
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Why rush to source alternatives to palm oil is problematic

Why rush to source alternatives to palm oil is problematic | forests | Scoop.it
Europe’s decision to limit the amount of palm oil used in biofuels may be welcome, but the jury is out on whether alternatives prove more or less damaging to the environment
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Indonesia defends deforestation for palm oil on economic grounds

Indonesia defends deforestation for palm oil on economic grounds | forests | Scoop.it
Clearing forests for palm oil plantations is a "technical" matter that should not get tied up with trade discussions, an Indonesian minister told a land and poverty conference.
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Tasmania's swift parrot set to follow the dodo

Tasmania's swift parrot set to follow the dodo | forests | Scoop.it
The iconic Tasmanian swift parrot is facing population collapse and could become extinct within 16 years, new research has found. Swift parrots are major pollinators of blue and black gum trees which are crucial to the forestry industry, which controversially continues to log swift parrot habitat.
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World's fragmented forests are deteriorating

World's fragmented forests are deteriorating | forests | Scoop.it
The world's forests are fragmented and deteriorating, states a new paper published in Science Advances. After analyzing satellite imagery and compiling data from long-term fragmentation studies, the authors conclude that 70 percent of remaining forest land exists within 1 km of an edge, which negatively impacts their fauna, flora, and ecosystem services.
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FUCOL INGENIERIA's curator insight, March 29, 2:31 PM

añada su visión ...

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Who's funding palm oil?

Who's funding palm oil? | forests | Scoop.it
Palm oil may be the single most important crop that you never heard of. A vegetable fat that resembles reddish butter at room temperature, palm oil is derived from the fruit of the oil palm tree. Both nutritious and highly versatile, palm oil is now an important component of products ranging from biofuels and food to soaps and cosmetics. Estimates indicate that as much as 50 percent of the products used by the average Western consumer every day contain palm oil or its derivatives.
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Mystery of Darwin's 'strange animals' solved

Mystery of Darwin's 'strange animals' solved | forests | Scoop.it
Analysis using ancient collagen protein could permit study of fossils older than DNA allows.
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Proposed law could decimate Indonesia's remaining forests

Proposed law could decimate Indonesia's remaining forests | forests | Scoop.it
A seemingly well-intended law that aims to turn forests over to traditional users could instead lead to large-scale destruction of Indonesia's native ecosystems, warns a prominent conservation biologist.
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Spectacular Lost Hummingbird Rediscovered after 69 years amid Rampant Fires across the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in Colombia

Spectacular Lost Hummingbird Rediscovered after 69 years amid Rampant Fires across the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in Colombia | forests | Scoop.it
Described in 1880, the charismatic Blue-bearded Helmetcrest (Oxypogon cyanolaemus) was last seen in 1946; thereafter, it disappeared. Restricted to the world’s highest coastal mountain range, the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (rising to over 19,000 feet), the Helmetcrest was suspected to be facing severe threats as cattle ranching by indigenous people expanded across the sensitive high-elevation slopes of the mountain range. Each dry season, more of the fragile brush and forest is burned to make way for grasslands for cattle. The fragile montane forests of the Santa Marta mountains are unique as this isolated mountain range pre-dates the Andes of South America by over 100 million years
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The Secret to Chameleons' Ability to Change Color

The Secret to Chameleons' Ability to Change Color | forests | Scoop.it
The lizards' cells undergo structural changes that affect how light reflects off their skin
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Cyclone Pam: Vanuatu residents find homes blown away

Cyclone Pam: Vanuatu residents find homes blown away | forests | Scoop.it
Residents in cyclone-ravaged Vanuatu remain hunkered in emergency shelters for a second straight night after venturing out to find their homes damaged or blown away by one of the region’s worst ever storms.
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Scientists question tropical protected areas' role under climate change

Scientists question tropical protected areas' role under climate change | forests | Scoop.it
New research highlights how poor connectivity of protected area (PA) networks in Southeast Asia may prevent lowland species from responding to climate change. Tropical species are shifting to higher elevations in response to rising temperatures, but there has been only limited research into the effectiveness of current protected area networks in facilitating such movements in the face of climate change.
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UN report warns of grave consequences if mangroves not protected

UN report warns of grave consequences if mangroves not protected | forests | Scoop.it
According to the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), global destruction of mangrove forests impacts biodiversity, food security, and the lives and livelihoods of some of the most marginalized communities in the world. Mangroves, which are forests of salt-tolerant trees and shrubs that lie along coastlines in the tropics and subtropics, are also invaluable carbon sinks. And we’re not doing nearly enough to protect them, says a recent report.
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