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The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert | forests | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Kolbert is a staff writer at The New Yorker. She is the author of The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History and Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change
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Ebola has wiped out a THIRD of chimps and gorillas

Ebola has wiped out a THIRD of chimps and gorillas | forests | Scoop.it
According to Meera Inglis, a researcher at the University of Sheffield, Ebola is the greatest threat to primates. A third of the world’s gorillas and chimpanzees have died from Ebola since 1990.
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Happy World Pangolin Day. What are we celebrating?

Happy World Pangolin Day. What are we celebrating? | forests | Scoop.it
It’s that crazy time of year again, World Pangolin Day, where we feverishly run out into the streets and join the thousands of pangolin protectors, fighting for the survival of our scaly friend. Well, no actually, hold on, what’s a pangolin?
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Bad Carbon Math is Hurting our Forests | Peter Lehner's Blog

Bad Carbon Math is Hurting our Forests | Peter Lehner's Blog | forests | Scoop.it
Western Europe has already lost about 97 percent of its original forests. But European power companies, under pressure to clean up their climate pollution and switch to renewable sources of energy, are increasingly looking to burn wood fuel instead of...
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Ethiopia: stealing the Omo Valley, destroying its ancient Peoples

Ethiopia: stealing the Omo Valley, destroying its ancient Peoples | forests | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: Ron Waddington

A land grab twice the size of France is under way in Ethiopia, as the government pursues the wholesale seizure if indigenous lands to turn them over to dams and plantations for sugar, palm oil, cotton and biofuels run by foreign corporations, destroying ancient cultures and turning Lake Turkana, the world's largest desert lake, into a new Aral Sea.

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Having your forests and eating them too - Terry Sunderland

Forests don't just supply trees and clean air, they also supply things like juicy edible caterpillars and life-saving cancer treatments. In "Having your forests and eating them too: Why trees are good for you", self-confessed science geek Terry Sunderland shares the ups and downs of 25 years as a forestry researcher and explains why forests must be factored into national policies regarding food, medicine and energy. Presented on the 14th of January at ‘Nerd Nite Indonesia’, @america, Jakarta.
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Climate change heatwaves killing off Australian birds

Climate change heatwaves killing off Australian birds | forests | Scoop.it
With climate change set to increase temperatures in Australia there is concern about how the heat will affect native birds. A researcher at the University of Adelaide says increasingly large numbers of birds are dying during heatwaves.
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European languages linked to migration from the east

European languages linked to migration from the east | forests | Scoop.it

A mysterious group of humans from the east stormed western Europe 4,500 years ago — bringing with them technologies such as the wheel, as well as a language that is the forebear of many modern tongues, suggests one of the largest studies of ancient DNA yet conducted. Vestiges of these eastern émigrés exist in the genomes of nearly all contemporary Europeans, according to the authors, who analysed genome data from nearly 100 ancient Europeans.

 

The first Homo sapiens to colonize Europe were hunter-gatherers who arrived from Africa, by way of the Middle East, around 45,000 years ago. (Neanderthals and other archaic human species had begun roaming the continent much earlier.) Archaeology and ancient DNA suggest that farmers from the Middle East started streaming in around 8,000 years ago, replacing the hunter-gatherers in some areas and mixing with them in others.

 

But last year, a study of the genomes of ancient and contemporary Europeans found echoes not only of these two waves from the Middle East, but also of an enigmatic third group that they said could be from farther east.

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Make Fossil Fuels History — Global Divestment Day is Happening Now!

Make Fossil Fuels History — Global Divestment Day is Happening Now! | forests | Scoop.it
Together, we will show that we are a truly global and growing force to be reckoned with. As the fossil fuel industry throws more money at fossil fuel expansion, we will turn up the volume of our divestment movement. And we won’t stop until we win.

Join us for Global Divestment Day on February 13 and 14 and together, let’s make fossil fuels history.
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Innovating Brazil nuts: a business with roots in the rainforest

Innovating Brazil nuts: a business with roots in the rainforest | forests | Scoop.it
Scientist and entrepreneur turn to Brazil nuts to protect Peru's threatened forests. Sofía Rubio was eight years old when she decided she wanted to be a biologist. 'I would skip school to go to the woods with my father or mother,' who did research in what is now the Tambopata National Reserve in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, she says.
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Why Trees Are Even More Awesome Than You Think

Why Trees Are Even More Awesome Than You Think | forests | Scoop.it

Would it surprise you to learn that, like animals, trees communicate with each other and pass on their legacy to the next generation? In this fascinating video, UBC Professor Suzanne Simard explains how trees are much more complex than most of us ever imagined. Although Charles Darwin assumed trees are simply individual organisms competing for survival of the fittest, Simard demonstrates just how wrong he was. In fact, the opposite is true: trees survive through mutual co-operation and support, passing around essential nutrients “depending on who needs it”.

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Christian Allié's comment, February 11, 9:09 AM
The Pygmies have taught me .... about trees, Nature & so on, ... "some" years ago! I'll never forget it ! Thanks a lot !
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Pollinator collapse could lead to a rise in malnutrition

Pollinator collapse could lead to a rise in malnutrition | forests | Scoop.it
Saving the world's pollinators may be a public health issue, according to recent research. Scientists have long believed that pollinators are important for human nutrition, but this is first time they have tested the hypothesis. What they found is disturbing: pollinator collapse could increase nutrient deficiency across local populations by a up to 56 percent in four developing counties.
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Forests that are sacred to local people are less likely to suffer deforestation, study suggests

Forests that are sacred to local people are less likely to suffer deforestation, study suggests | forests | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: Ippei & Janine Naoi

"As sacred forests are found in many cultures around the world, there is some hope that, in addition to their cultural significance, the persistence of these values can make an important contribution to conservation of biodiversity."

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Do forests attract rain?

Until recently most atmospheric scientists were confident that forests don't attract rain. Recent theory and research challenges that confidence, and suggest that forests play a vastly more significant role in maintaining global rainfall patterns than was previously realized. Here Douglas Sheil explains the ongoing controversy and highlights why it matters so much to so many people. Is this really a whole new value for forests?

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Once 'invisible,' Africa’s domestic loggers come into the light

Once 'invisible,' Africa’s domestic loggers come into the light | forests | Scoop.it

In the past seven years, our team from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), together with the French agricultural and development research center CIRAD and numerous national partners in several African countries, has focused on domestic wood markets, conducting in-depth research on their importance and how they function.

 

Our work shows that we are talking about hundreds of thousands of people who live off this sector directly or indirectly, and also about millions of cubic meters of wood—often in volumes higher than those officially exported to Europe or to China.

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Today is a defining moment for Europe’s flawed biofuels policy

Today is a defining moment for Europe’s flawed biofuels policy | forests | Scoop.it
MEPs set to vote on whether to limit the use of food crops in biofuels, which campaigners claim is fuelling deforestation in Indonesia
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Balkan dam boom threatens Europe’s last wild waterways

Balkan dam boom threatens Europe’s last wild waterways | forests | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: Mihai Popa

Environmental concerns have pushed one flagship dam project to the brink of cancellation but a ‘gold rush on the rivers’ of south-east Europe puts these unique ecosystems and their wildlife, including the critically endangered Balkan lynx, in jeopardy

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Another Major Oil Producer calls for Carbon Pricing

Another Major Oil Producer calls for Carbon Pricing | forests | Scoop.it

 

In another astonishing announcement, a second major Oil producer has called for a global carbon  pricing mechanism. BP follows last week’s speech from Ben Van Beurden, CEO of Shell, which called for policies to curb climate change, including a price on carbon.

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Selective logging causes long-term changes to forest structure

Selective logging causes long-term changes to forest structure | forests | Scoop.it
Selective logging is causing long-term changes to tropical forests in Africa by facilitating the growth of weeds and vines, which reduces plant diversity and diminishes carbon storage, reports a new paper published in the journal Ecological Research. The paper is based on field data from more than 500 plots in Sierra Leone, Ghana, Cameroon and Gabon.
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European bison did not dwell in the forest: Modern conservation concepts are in need of revision

European bison did not dwell in the forest: Modern conservation concepts are in need of revision | forests | Scoop.it
Paleontologists examined the oldest known bones of bison from Europe. Their research revealed that European Bison were “mixed eaters” who preferred open landscapes to a life in the forest. These findings have a direct impact on the current conservation concept for these animals, which are threatened with extinction.
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The Comeback

The Comeback | forests | Scoop.it
In the wake of the Idle No More protest movement, John Ralston Saul decided to write a book about Canada's difficult relationship with the First Nations. In it, he argues that they are now poised to reclaim a central place in Canadian affairs. Paul Kennedy explores the thesis with Saul and Hayden King of Ryerson University.
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Orangutans might survive sustainable logging - Conservation

Orangutans might survive sustainable logging - Conservation | forests | Scoop.it
Orangutans are thought to stay in the trees, coming down only when necessary. But new research suggests they are more terrestrial than we thought.
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Fossils from heart of Amazon provide evidence that South American monkeys came from Africa

Fossils from heart of Amazon provide evidence that South American monkeys came from Africa | forests | Scoop.it
The early evolutionary history of monkeys in South America is cloaked in mystery. Long thought to have journeyed from Africa, evidence for this hypothesis was difficult to support without fossil data. A new discovery now unveils a key chapter of their evolutionary saga. The discovery of three new extinct monkeys from eastern Peru hints strongly that South American monkeys have an African ancestry.
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Amber fossil links earliest grasses, dinosaurs and fungus used to produce LSD

Amber fossil links earliest grasses, dinosaurs and fungus used to produce LSD | forests | Scoop.it
A perfectly preserved amber fossil from Myanmar has been found that provides evidence of the earliest grass specimen ever discovered -- about 100 million years old -- and even then it was topped by a fungus similar to ergot, a hallucinogen which for eons has been intertwined with animals and humans. Among other things, it gave us the psychedelic drug LSD.
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Shade coffee is for the birds: But even in the Ethiopian home of Arabica, forests are needed too

Shade coffee is for the birds: But even in the Ethiopian home of Arabica, forests are needed too | forests | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: Evan Buechley
The conservation value of growing coffee under trees instead of on open farms is well known, but hasn't been studied much in Africa. So a University of Utah-led research team studied birds in the Ethiopian home of Arabica coffee and found that "shade coffee" farms are good for birds, but some species do best in forest.

 

"Ethiopian shade coffee may be the most bird friendly coffee in the world, but a primary forest is irreplaceable for bird conservation, especially for birds of the forest understory," says doctoral student Evan Buechley, lead author of a new study that will be published online Feb. 11 in the journal Biological Conservation.

 

"The best coffee for biodiversity is organic shade coffee in Ethiopia, where the coffee is a native species of the forest," says ornithologist Çağan Şekercioğlu, the study's senior author and assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah. "It is grown where it belongs in its native habitat with native tree cover and without chemicals."

 

"Not all shade coffee is equal," Şekercioğlu adds. "Because shade coffee is trendy, there are a lot of commercial plantations in the world where they grow shade coffee under exotic trees, not native trees, so they can call it shade coffee. But it's not as bird friendly as in Ethiopia."

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The Science of Why We Don't Believe Science

The Science of Why We Don't Believe Science | forests | Scoop.it
How our brains fool us on climate, creationism, and the vaccine-autism link.
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