forests
Follow
Find
17.3K views | +35 today
 
Scooped by Wildforests
onto forests
Scoop.it!

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert | forests | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Kolbert is a staff writer at The New Yorker. She is the author of The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History and Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change
more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

forests
biodiversity, ecology, ecotourism, permaculture and conservation
Curated by Wildforests
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Should the role of afforestation in climate change mitigation policy be re-evaluated?

Should the role of afforestation in climate change mitigation policy be re-evaluated? | forests | Scoop.it
Afforestation (planting trees) to mitigate climate change could cause warming rather than cooling globally due to non-carbon effects of land use change, according to new research from the University of Bristol.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Ten ways remote sensing can contribute to conservation

Ten ways remote sensing can contribute to conservation | forests | Scoop.it
Scientists from the WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), NASA, and other organizations have partnered to focus global attention on the contribution of satellites to biodiversity conservation in a recently released study entitled "Ten Ways Remote...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Seychelles poachers go nutty for erotic shaped seed

Seychelles poachers go nutty for erotic shaped seed | forests | Scoop.it
Under cover of darkness in the steamy jungles of the Seychelles thieves creep out to harvest the sizeable and valuable nuts of the famous coco de mer palm, and their activities are threatening its long-term survival.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

The 9 rarest plants in the world

The 9 rarest plants in the world | forests | Scoop.it

The most threatened plants today are almost all classed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). These plants occupy some of the most inaccessible, remote parts of our planet. They are threatened by habitat destruction, illegal collection, poaching, and competition with invading species.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

If a Tree Falls in the Forest...

If a Tree Falls in the Forest... | forests | Scoop.it
It’s World Philosophy Day! Here at the Rainforest Alliance, we tend to spend this day pondering the age-old conundrum: “If a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

IUCN summit delivers major commitments to save Earth’s most precious natural areas

IUCN summit delivers major commitments to save Earth’s most precious natural areas | forests | Scoop.it
Sydney, Australia – The IUCN World Parks Congress 2014, the once-in-a-decade global forum on protected areas, closes today with the release of The Promise of Sydney. The Promise sets out an ambitious agenda to safeguard the planet’s natural assets, ranging from halting rainforest loss in the Asia-Pacific and tripling ocean protection off Africa’s coasts to a business commitment to plant 1.3 billion trees along the historic Silk Road.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

A nature photographer's dream: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society

A nature photographer's dream: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society | forests | Scoop.it
Julie Larsen Maher has what many wildlife photographers would consider a dream job: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), a non-profit that runs five zoos and aquariums in New York City as well as numerous site-based field programs in the U.S. and overseas. As staff photographer, Maher helps tell the stories behind WCS's conservation work, which ranges from veterinary procedures with Bronx Zoo animals to working with local communities in remote parts of Zambia to protect wildlife.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Protecting forests alone would not halt land-use change emissions

Protecting forests alone would not halt land-use change emissions | forests | Scoop.it
Global forest conservation measures meant to mitigate climate change are likely to drive massive cropland expansion into shrublands or savannahs to satisfy the ever-growing hunger for arable land.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

A Scientist's Call for Civility And Diversity in Conservation by Diane Toomey

A Scientist's Call for Civility And Diversity in Conservation by Diane Toomey | forests | Scoop.it

For the past few years, an acrimonious debate has been ranging between two camps of conservationists. One faction advocates protecting nature for its intrinsic value. The other claims that if the degradation of the natural world is to be halted, nature’s fundamental value — in other words, what nature can do for us — needs to be stressed. The tone of the rhetoric has 
led to a petition, published this month in the journal Nature, that criticizes both sides for indulging in ad hominem attacks and unproductive arguments that have devolved into “increasingly vitriolic, personal battles.”

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

A kingdom of cave beetles found in Southern China

A kingdom of cave beetles found in Southern China | forests | Scoop.it
A team of scientists specializing in cave biodiversity from the South China Agricultural University (Guangzhou) unearthed a treasure trove of rare blind cave beetles. The description of seven new species of underground Trechinae beetles, published in the open access journal ZooKeys, attests for the ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Peru's forests store more CO2 than US emits in a year, research shows

Peru's forests store more CO2 than US emits in a year, research shows | forests | Scoop.it
Carbon mapping by the Carnegie Institute for Science reveals nearly seven billion tonnes of carbon stored in Peru’s rainforests, in a technique that could help preserve such stores to reduce carbon emissions
more...
Judit Urquijo's curator insight, November 13, 6:29 PM

Un reciente estudio del Carnegie Institute demuestra que las selvas peruanas tienen capacidad para almacenar más CO2 que el que produce EEUU a lo largo de un año.


La nueva cartografía generada que refleja los datos de carbono almacenada va a permitir al país negociar un precio justo por sus reservas en los mercados de carbono.


No obstante, uno de los principales peligros que corre el país es que gran parte de ese carbono sea de nuevo emitido a la atmósfera debido a las actividades de tala o a la construcción de infraestructuras, aspectos que recogía hace unos días la web Mongabay.


En este sentido, las últimas iniciativas legislativas del país tampoco favorecen la conservación de estos reservorios naturales, puesto que el gobierno peruano ha decidido incentivar la inversión extranjera modificando las normas medioambientales. De esta forma, se van a reducir, por ejemplo, la cuantía de las multas y sanciones o el tiempo para la realización de estudios de impacto ambiental.

Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Another mining company found operating in flagrant violation of Indonesian law

Another mining company found operating in flagrant violation of Indonesian law | forests | Scoop.it
A Harita group mining company in West Kalimantan, Indonesia has been operating well outside of its permit boundary, reports local NGO, Forest Monitoring Volunteers of Borneo (RPHK). Their investigation found that PT. Karya Utama Tambang Jaya, is operating illegally on 78 hectares of land. The company holds permits to mine bauxite (aluminum ore) on 8,878 hectares.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

The corporations that turn rainforests into toilet paper

The corporations that turn rainforests into toilet paper | forests | Scoop.it

The Ethical Shopping Guide is a cool new resource. It lets you check out the environmental and social impacts of corporations that produce the products you buy every day. As Penny van Oosterzee and ALERT director Bill Laurance argue in a new...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Primates indispensable for regeneration of tropical forests

Primates indispensable for regeneration of tropical forests | forests | Scoop.it
Primatologist and plant geneticists have studied the dispersal of tree seeds by New World primates. Primates can influence seed dispersal and spatial genetic kinship structure of plants that serve as their food source.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Amazon frogs found to build mental maps of their local area

Amazon frogs found to build mental maps of their local area | forests | Scoop.it

A quartet of researchers with the University of Vienna has found that the brilliant-thighed poison frog is able to build a mental map of its immediate surroundings and use it to navigate. The finding, the team reports in their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, suggests that such frogs have the mental ability to understand the environment in which they live.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Degradation of forest cover is a threat

Degradation of forest cover is a threat | forests | Scoop.it

Mr Yaw Kwakye, Manager of Climate Change Unit of the Forestry Department, has expressed concern about the loss of forest cover and forest degradation in Ghana, saying it was leading to Green House Gas emissions and global warming.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

How Palm Oil Production Has Changed Life for the Orangutan

How Palm Oil Production Has Changed Life for the Orangutan | forests | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: Outlook Expeditions

Palm oil is a vegetable oil that can be found in around 50 percent of all consumer goods. This singular oil may appear to be an unassuming additive, but when you look down the supply chain to the regions of the world where palm oil is grown, this oil becomes rather devious. Palm oil production is one of the leading causes of deforestation in the Indonesian islands of Borneo and Sumatra. In Sumatra, approximately 10.8 million hectares of tropical forest have been cleared to make way for palm plantations, and the circumstances in Borneo are no better.

 

The process most favored by the palm oil industry for clearing space for palm plantations is the slash and burn technique. A rather self-explanatory process, palm producers hack away at the existing fauna present in the rainforest, then set what is left on fire to create a flat, unadulterated plain. This process destroys any living being, plant or animal, in sight. Palm oil is a highly profitable crop, meaning many companies are willing to turn a blind eye to the damage that is caused in its production.

 

Sadly, however, there are many casualties of the palm industry as the result of this vicious practice, one of the most prominent being the orangutan.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Biological warfare flares up again between EO Wilson and Richard Dawkins

Biological warfare flares up again between EO Wilson and Richard Dawkins | forests | Scoop.it

The war of words between the biologists EO Wilson and Richard Dawkins has reignited after the Harvard professor described his Oxford counterpart as a “journalist”.

 

In an interview with Evan Davis on BBC2’s Newsnight to promote his latest book, Wilson was asked about his differing view of natural selection compared with that of Dawkins.

 

Wilson answered: “There is no dispute between me and Richard Dawkins and there never has been, because he’s a journalist, and journalists are people that report what the scientists have found and the arguments I’ve had have actually been with scientists doing research.”

 

Shortly after the programme was broadcast, Dawkins tweeted: “I greatly admire EO Wilson & his huge contributions to entomology, ecology, biogeography, conservation, etc. He’s just wrong on kin selection.”

 

A second tweet said: “Anybody who thinks I’m a journalist who reports what other scientists think is invited to read The Extended Phenotype.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

'Extinct' snail turns up in alley

'Extinct' snail turns up in alley | forests | Scoop.it

Bermudian land snails found by a local resident despite being considered extinct for 40 years.

The species of Bermudian land snail, known as Poecilozonites bermudensis, hadn't been seen on the island for more than 40 years. But now a colony of the creatures has been found flourishing in a "damp and overgrown alleyway" in the capital city, Hamilton, by a local resident, the Royal Gazette website reports. "For it to be found in Hamilton is unbelievable. It's the last place you would imagine that a small colony of rare snails would be discovered," says Dr Mark Outerbridge of the government's Conservation Service. It's thought that by choosing a concrete home, the snails were protected from the predators that wiped out the rest of their population, Dr Outerbridge says.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

'Probiotics' for plants boost detox abilities; untreated plants overdose and die

'Probiotics' for plants boost detox abilities; untreated plants overdose and die | forests | Scoop.it

Scientists using a microbe that occurs naturally in eastern cottonwood trees have boosted the ability of two other plants - willow and lawn grass - to withstand the withering effects of the nasty industrial pollutant phenanthrene and take up 25 to 40 percent more of the pollutant than untreated plants.

 

Our approach is much like when humans take probiotic pills or eat yogurt with probiotics to supplement the 'good' microbes in their guts.




more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Shut down the Thai ivory trade

Shut down the Thai ivory trade | forests | Scoop.it

Thailand’s ivory market is the largest unregulated market in the world and trade is largely fueled by ivory from poached African elephant’s tusks that are smuggled into the country. Current national law allows for ivory from domesticated Thai elephants to be sold legally. As a result large quantities of African ivory can be laundered through Thai markets. Only by closing the domestic trade in ivory can Thailand help eliminate the threat to African elephants.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

'Inner GPS' of bird brains may be better than that of humans

'Inner GPS' of bird brains may be better than that of humans | forests | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: eugene beckes

The 2014 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine was awarded to three neuroscientists for their pioneering work on the brain's "inner GPS system". Over the course of four decades, they revealed that a small part in the brain called the hippocampus stores a map of animals' surroundings and helps them navigate.

 

Seed-caching birds and brood-parasitic cowbirds are two of the most remarkable examples that rely on spatial navigation for their existence. Their directional skills can even surpass those of some humans.

 

Seed-caching birds store food in hundreds or even thousands of sites, and retrieve it hours or even months later. The Clark's nutcracker (seen above), for instance, displays the most striking hoarding behaviour, making more than 5000 caches of seeds in the autumn and recovering them seven to nine months later in the spring.

 

Similarly, female cowbirds search for host nests in which to lay eggs. Like cuckoos, they do not raise their own young and want to ensure the host that does will definitely be tricked into doing so. They perform a meticulous daily examination of various nests before making a decision and returning to the selected one a few days later.

 

The reason for this is that the survival of the baby cowbird is dependent on the relative timing of hatching of host and parasitic eggs. The female cowbirds can only lay their eggs in the hosts' nests when the host is also laying her own eggs, making the nest very briefly available to the cowbird. Nests must therefore be erased from the cowbird's memory as "potential targets" once they are no longer available, just as hoarders have to discard cache sites once they have recovered the food stored in it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

'Guns kill trees too': overhunting raises extinction threat for trees

'Guns kill trees too': overhunting raises extinction threat for trees | forests | Scoop.it
A new paper confirms what ecologists have long feared: hunting birds and mammals drastically raises the risk of extinction for tropical trees. Following the long-lifespan of a single canopy tree, Miliusa horsfieldii, researchers discovered that overhunting of animals could increase the chances of extinction for the species fourteen times over a century, from 0.5 percent to seven percent.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

'Eyespots' in butterflies shown to distract predatory attack

'Eyespots' in butterflies shown to distract predatory attack | forests | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: David DeHetre

Research has demonstrated with some of the first experimental evidence that coloration or patterns can be used to 'deflect' attacks from predators, protecting an animal's most vulnerable parts from the predators most likely to attack them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildforests
Scoop.it!

Protecting native forests more valuable than logging

Protecting native forests more valuable than logging | forests | Scoop.it

New research has found Mountain Ash forests provide more value to the community and the global climate when protected and not logged.

 

Research scientists at the ANU, in partnership with information and communication technologists at Fujitsu Laboratories in Japan, have used long-term field data from the Central Highlands in Victoria to calculate the social, economic and environmental values of the forests after wildfire and after logging.

 

"Quantifying natural resources and the services they provide for human wellbeing is important in evaluating land management decisions," said researcher Dr Heather Keith from the Fenner School of Environment and Society.

Known as ecosystem services, the results show that protecting forests by ending logging could double the amount of carbon stored in the trees.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-11-native-forests-valuable.html#jCp
more...
No comment yet.