Foresight+Design
556 views | +0 today
Follow
Foresight+Design
Seeing and shaping what's to come
Curated by Ming-Li Chai
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ming-Li Chai
Scoop.it!

Social Media Trends You Need To Know In 2017 (infographic)

Social Media Trends You Need To Know In 2017 (infographic) | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
This infographic takes a closer look at the upcoming year and what marketers can expect in the social media world. It outlines 6 trends that we believe you’ll see in 2017.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ming-Li Chai
Scoop.it!

Centaur chess marries human and machine -- BloomReach

Centaur chess marries human and machine -- BloomReach | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

The story of IBM’s Deep Blue computer defeating world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997 has been told so many times that it’s practically shorthand for the philosophical debate over man vs. machine. But the story lacks subtlety and perhaps the right moral. Deep Blue was only the beginning; and out of Kasparov’s defea

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from Communication tomorrow
Scoop.it!

Freaky feeling: Why androids make us uneasy - tech - 15 January 2013 - New Scientist

Freaky feeling: Why androids make us uneasy - tech - 15 January 2013 - New Scientist | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
We're often creeped out by human-like robots or animated characters, but what they do to our minds is more complex than you might think
Ming-Li Chai's insight:

The particular brand of sympathy we reserve for other people requires us to believe the thing we are sympathising with has a self. And this concession of a mind to something not human makes us uncomfortable.

more...
Ming-Li Chai's curator insight, March 26, 2014 5:30 PM

The particular brand of sympathy we reserve for other people requires us to believe the thing we are sympathising with has a self. And this concession of a mind to something not human makes us uncomfortable.

Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from From Complexity to Wisdom
Scoop.it!

How the Science of Swarms Can Help Us Fight Cancer and Predict the Future - Wired Science

How the Science of Swarms Can Help Us Fight Cancer and Predict the Future - Wired Science | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

Thanks to new observation technologies, powerful software, and statistical methods, the mechanics of collectives are being revealed. Indeed, enough physicists, biologists, and engineers have gotten involved that the science itself seems to be hitting a density-dependent shift.


Via Erika Harrison
more...
Erika Harrison's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:08 PM

"And it may turn out that crowds of humans have more in common with schools of fish than we ever imagined".

Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from FutureSocial
Scoop.it!

Encapsulation, Tree Rings & Why the Future is Driven By the Past

Encapsulation, Tree Rings & Why the Future is Driven By the Past | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

People often think new technology replaces the old. In reality it rarely does. To Sid Mead’s point, the problem is that it arrives, but not all at once.


New technology has– to some extent– to be compatible with the past. So rather than replace it, it often lays over the old system and encapsulates it. In doing this, it has a firm foundation but it also means it inherits some of the characteristics of the old technology.


It’s exactly the same process with trees. Every year a ‘new’ tree encapsulates the old tree like an overcoat, yet it relies on the old tree to support this new layer. Every knot, branch and imperfection is reproduced by each successive layer.


Via Steve Law
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ming-Li Chai
Scoop.it!

Scientists Reconstruct Brains' Visions Into Digital Video In Historic Experiment

Scientists Reconstruct Brains' Visions Into Digital Video In Historic Experiment | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
UC Berkeley scientists have developed a system to capture visual activity in human brains and reconstruct it as digital video clips. Eventually, this process will allow you to record and reconstruct your own dreams on a computer screen.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ming-Li Chai
Scoop.it!

Art on Art: An Eames Expression

Art on Art: An Eames Expression | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
Local Austin artists and designers dare to create art on art, turning Eames Chairs into their own unquie expression.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
Scoop.it!

Paris airport testing 'holographic' staffers

Paris airport testing 'holographic' staffers | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

Being told your plane is about to board could get a lot more pleasant, if other airports around the world follow France's lead. Paris's Orly airport is testing virtual boarding agents using what officials there are calling "2-D holograms." Paris-Orly has been testing the virtual displays out for about a month now, and, as you can see in a video, they definitely draw a lot of attention.


Via trendspotter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
Scoop.it!

The Smartest Cities Will Use People as Their Sensors: Scientific American

The Smartest Cities Will Use People as Their Sensors: Scientific American | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
By networking individuals and their gadgets, urban apps will tell inhabitants what is happening all around them, in real time...
Via trendspotter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
Scoop.it!

Service 2020: Megatrends for the decade ahead

Service 2020: Megatrends for the decade ahead | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

In the future consumers will select those organisations who can demonstrate they known their customers well and who offer service levels which stand out.  Organisations who fail to align their service to meet customers’ needs will risk losing...


Via Mike Spencer, trendspotter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
Scoop.it!

Kevin Kelly: The Futurist's Dilemma

Arthur C. Clarke said that if you find a prediction reasonable, than it is probably wrong, because the future is not reasonable; it is fantastic! But if you could return from the future with the exact truth about what will happen, no one would believe you because the future is too fantastic! By fantastic he means issuing from the realm of fantasy and the imagination -- beyond what we expect. This is the futurist's dilemma: Any believable prediction will be wrong. Any correct prediction will be unbelievable. Either way, a futurist can't win. He is either dismissed or wrong. Except if he hits that razor's edge between the two realms, right on the cusp between plausibility and fantasy, where it is almost true in the improbable future. This is the sweet spot that science fiction authors aim for.


Via trendspotter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from From Complexity to Wisdom
Scoop.it!

Embracing Complexity - Harvard Business Review

Embracing Complexity - Harvard Business Review | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

In his job as chief investment strategist at Legg Mason Capital Management, Michael J. Mauboussin has developed a healthy appreciation for complexity. Along the way—through his reports, books, teaching at Columbia Business School, and frequent conference appearances—he has become a leading exponent of how to navigate complex systems in financial markets and other aspects of life. In this edited conversation with HBR senior editor Tim Sullivan, Mauboussin talks about how his views on complexity feed into his daily practices and attitudes.


Via Erika Harrison
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ming-Li Chai
Scoop.it!

Inside Oculus’ Quest to Design an Invisible VR Controller

Inside Oculus’ Quest to Design an Invisible VR Controller | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
The Oculus Touch goes on on sale today, and it's more than a set of VR controllers. The devices are, in effect, your hands.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from Cooperation Theory & Practice
Scoop.it!

Meta-Collaboration: Thinking With Another

Meta-Collaboration: Thinking With Another | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

The two aspects of being human that set us apart from other mammals are metacognition and the deep desire to belong or feel felt. Our sense of needing to belong to a group is an inherited part of our neurobiology, and collaboration with others is the desired outcome. Metacognition is our brains' miraculous innate ability to self-assess, think about our thinking, and reshape our perspectives.

Feeling the emotions of others, social acceptance, and cooperation are critical to our early development of the identity and industry stages. Author and motivational speaker Daniel Pink states that the future belongs to conceptual cooperative thinkers.


Via Howard Rheingold
more...
Howard Rheingold's curator insight, July 13, 2015 2:19 PM

Wonderfully, this post addresses two subjects I track because I know they are important: metacognition and its role in infotention, and the relationship of human cooperation to social media

phoebecoaming's comment, August 19, 2016 1:18 AM
good
ringacrux's comment, August 27, 2016 1:11 AM
Thats brilliant
Scooped by Ming-Li Chai
Scoop.it!

FIXED - The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement

FIXED - The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
FIXED: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement takes a close look at the drive to be “better than human” and the radical technological innovations that may tak
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from Communication tomorrow
Scoop.it!

The robot tricks to bridge the uncanny valley - tech - 19 March 2014 - New Scientist

The robot tricks to bridge the uncanny valley - tech - 19 March 2014 - New Scientist | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
Giving robots a series of small behavioural tics can make help them appear a lot more human, which makes us feel more comfortable interacting with them
Ming-Li Chai's insight:

A chirpy, positive-sounding bleep after being slapped, kissed, stroked or having its eyes covered.  A small random head twitch now and then.  A fleeting gaze when thinking of an answer (perhaps more thoughtfully) to a question ... they may seem less efficient, but these small behavioural tics can help robots appear a lot more human, which makes us feel more comfortable interacting with them.

more...
Ming-Li Chai's curator insight, March 26, 2014 5:46 PM

A chirpy, positive-sounding bleep after being slapped, kissed, stroked or having its eyes covered.  A small random head twitch now and then.  A fleeting gaze when thinking of an answer (perhaps more thoughtfully) to a question ... they may seem less efficient, but these small behavioural tics can help robots appear a lot more human, which makes us feel more comfortable interacting with them.

Scooped by Ming-Li Chai
Scoop.it!

10 Signs Internet TV is Ready to Disrupt the Industry

10 Signs Internet TV is Ready to Disrupt the Industry | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

A talk about the Future of Television.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from Pervasive Entertainment Times
Scoop.it!

Sensory Futures, Experiential Entertainment - social transmedia storytelling WIRED

Sensory Futures, Experiential Entertainment - social transmedia storytelling WIRED | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

We are living in experiential times and mass entertainment is in rapid transition. We, as producers of this content, are clearly marching down a road toward a personal entertainment Holodeck. Once the sole domain of theme parks every part of the media landscape is becoming experiential and there is a good deal evidence over the past few years of this behavioral and content media shift.


Via Gary Hayes
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from From Complexity to Wisdom
Scoop.it!

MediaShift . 8 Ways Tech-Based Foundations Are Changing Philanthropy | PBS

MediaShift . 8 Ways Tech-Based Foundations Are Changing Philanthropy | PBS | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

Not so long ago, most major U.S. foundations fit the image of the giant East Coast institution, rooted in fortunes made by titans of the manufacturing and extractive industries. For decades, the Ford, Carnegie, and Rockefeller foundations carried out sweeping programs on a scale that rivaled those of governments. Many public reforms and institutions were buoyed by their efforts, including public broadcasting, public libraries, and the Green Revolution.

 

But in recent years that primacy has been challenged by a host of new foundations, rooted in the digital communications and technology sector, that are rewriting the rules of American philanthropy. They don't always march in lockstep or speak with one voice, but they are generating a new philanthropic culture nonetheless.


Via Erika Harrison
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ming-Li Chai
Scoop.it!

What Do Backpacks Say About Design?

The limitations of a backpack force us to choose carefully about what we fill them with, and those decisions are all about design.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
Scoop.it!

Sony: emotion-reading games possible in ten years

Sony: emotion-reading games possible in ten years | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

Sony’s executives believe that in ten years’ time, video games will have the ability to read more than just movement on the part of the player: “Having a camera being able to study a player’s biometrics and movements [is possible] so perhaps you can play a detective game that decides whether you’re lying due to what it reads from your face,” said Mike Hocking, a senior director at Sony Worldwide Studios. “In ten years’ time I’d like to think we’ll be able to form a map of the player, combining other sorts of sensory data together, from facial expressions to heart rate. “You can see how, over a period of time, you can form a map of the player and their emotional state, whether they’re sad or happy. Maybe people in their social network can comment on it. The more accurate that map can become, the more we can tailor it to the experience.


Via trendspotter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
Scoop.it!

"Skin-Like" Electronic Patch Takes Pulse, Promises New Human-Machine Integration: Scientific American

"Skin-Like" Electronic Patch Takes Pulse, Promises New Human-Machine Integration: Scientific American | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it
A web of miniscule wires woven into an adhesiveless silicon patch could provide a future where heart monitors are nearly invisible, prosthetics can feel pressure and video games can take verbal commands...
Via Martin Talks, trendspotter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
Scoop.it!

The Future is Complicated

The Future is Complicated | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

We live in a time of amazing scientific discovery, and every day it seems that possibilities are unlocked to do amazing things. But it’s important to remember that it takes money, hard work, and time to translate those discoveries into practical applications. And the mere possibility of doing something simply isn’t enough to make a particular type of technology practical, economical, or popular.

That’s something we need to keep in mind as we try to determine what our future will look like.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, trendspotter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ming-Li Chai from :: Science Innovation :: Research News ::
Scoop.it!

South Korea chain opens 'virtual' store in subway station

South Korea chain opens 'virtual' store in subway station | Foresight+Design | Scoop.it

A major South Korean retailer owned by British giant Tesco has opened a virtual store in a busy Seoul subway station, for increasingly sophisticated smartphone users to order groceries and more. Shoppers download a related application on their smartphone and make purchases by taking photos of the barcodes.


Via trendspotter
more...
No comment yet.