Forensic Linguistics
7 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Essien Popoola from Language, society and law
Scoop.it!

Are ""I ♥ boobies!" bracelets lewd?

Are ""I ♥ boobies!" bracelets lewd? | Forensic Linguistics | Scoop.it
A court case about whether wearing "I ♥ boobies!" bracelets is lewd and disruptive in school shines light on an old word

Via Tim Grant
Essien Popoola's insight:

I think the debate in breast cancer discourse about the apporiateness of the term 'booble cancer' is relevant to this and would be a good starting point for analysis. This link below suggests the term is distateful, rather than lewd - like 'I {heart} Balls" might not be appropriate for testicular cancer !

http://niuwrc.blogspot.co.uk/2010/10/breast-cancer-or-boobie-cancer.html

more...
Tim Grant's curator insight, November 1, 2013 7:49 AM

Great opening sentence to this article "Boobies have been around for about 150 years" and Mr Slang, Jonathon Green, has his say too - "Chugs. Wallopies. Grapefruits. Zoomers. Zogs. Cajooblies. All can be found in the pages of Green’s Dictionary of Slang."

 

I can't wait to read the the US Supreme Court's judegement on the free speech issues although I can't see how the Pennsylvania School Boards Association could win.

Rescooped by Essien Popoola from Language, society and law
Scoop.it!

Language Log » A fair-use victory for Google in these United States

Language Log » A fair-use victory for Google in these United States | Forensic Linguistics | Scoop.it

Via Tim Grant
Essien Popoola's insight:

The judge, in siding with Google, gushes about the wonders of the n-gram analyis tool. Yes it is interesting and insightful, but is that a good enough reason to bypass the intellectual property rights of millions of actual authors of Google Books? I'm sure n-gram analysis would do  (is doing?) a great job with my personal email, but that doesn't mean Google shuld be allowed to upblish them in the public domain! 

more...
Tim Grant's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:47 AM

This is a significant legal win for Google – that scanning and digitising books is ‘fair use’. 

 

The judgement interestingly referred to the Google n-gram language analysis tool as an example of the wider benefit of Google’s work.  The judge even referred to the LanguageLog analysis of the linguistic shift from “The United States are…” to “The United States is…” as an example.