Forensic Medicine
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Lifesaver

Lifesaver | Forensic Medicine | Scoop.it
Would you know what to do if someone collapsed in front of you? Our free app, Lifesaver will show you what to do. You learn by doing: do it wrong, and see the consequences; do it right, and sense the thrill of saving a life.
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This is a fantastic eLearning resource on how to give basic life support. It takes you through three real-life scenarios (sudden cardiac arrest in a young man, a young woman choking on food, and the sudden collapse and resuscitation of an older man) via interactive videos, which are guaranteed to immerse you in the scenarios. You are graded on your response times, and on how well you perform simulated CPR and, if you wish, you can share your scores online via social media!
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Medical Ethics Manual

Medical Ethics Manual | Forensic Medicine | Scoop.it
An introduction to Medical Ethics
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'First do no harm' ... This guide to medical ethics produced by the World Medical Association sets out the underlying principles of ethics and morality which guide our interactions between patients, colleagues and society. It is an excellent introduction to the topic which informs our role as physicians, and guides our actions in the complex and uncertain sphere of activity that is medicine.

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Listening to the voices of abused older people: should we classify system abuse?

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A thought-provoking article on disrespect and abuse of the elderly in health-care settings. The authors propose the addition of 'system abuse' (harm or distress to an older person that is caused by the organisation/ institutional practices) to the WHO definition, which refers to interpersonal relationships in which the abuse can occur.

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Care and Evidence

Care and Evidence | Forensic Medicine | Scoop.it

Home Office and NHS training resource for the care and examination of victims of sexual assault.

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This resource is a few years old now, but provides advice and instruction for healthcare personnel caring for victims of sexual assault. There are videos taking you through the stages of forensic evidence collection/ retrieval, history taking, and examination, as well as the provision of medical care.

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Richard Jones's curator insight, July 10, 2014 6:15 AM

An educational resource aimed at healthcare personnel caring for victims of sexual assault, including video instruction on how to examine the patient, and the recovery of forensic trace evidence.

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Forensic medicine and pathology resources on the internet

Finding reliable medical educational resources on the internet can be challenging, and this applies to forensic medicine and pathology.

This article provides a convenient starting point for freely available resources created, and curated, by a practicing forensic pathologist.
Richard Jones's insight:

Forensic medicine is an exciting area of medicine which, whilst not considered a 'core' undergraduate subject in England and Wales medical schools, is relevant to everything that doctors do, and your general medical and surgical teaching and learning.

 

As with all internet-based resources, the sheer volume of forensic-related materials available can be overwhelming. This Storify article collects resources which will complement your teaching and learning whilst studying medicine at Cardiff University (and beyond). Some of the resources will be more relevant in your early years, whilst others will be of increasing relevance when you become more experienced at clinical medicine.

 

These internet-based resources are also supplemented by a collection of themed resources on your year page on Learning Central, including an eLearning module on wounds and injuries, which will be of relevance when undertaking placements in emergency medicine. In this module you will learn how to recognise the differences between injuries caused by blunt force trauma, as opposed to sharp force trauma, and will learn about different patterns of injury from falls, road traffic collisions, and assault, including in patients who might be vulnerable through extremes of age, lifestyle, or their personal circumstances.

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Richard Jones's curator insight, April 4, 2014 10:45 AM

 

The educational resources that I have been putting together to support teaching and learning in forensic medicine and pathology over the years are scattered around the web, so I thought it was about time to pull them together for 'ease of reference'!

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Complexity and forensic pathology - Forensic Science International

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Many deaths of medicolegal interest are complicated. Take a sudden death following physical restraint by law enforcement personnel, or sudden death following a struggle against an assailant which includes gripping of the neck, for example.

 

There are numerous potential pathophysiological factors of relevance, and the forensic pathologist tries to integrate the anatomical post mortem findings with the circumstances of the death in order to decide which of the potential factors which might have contributed to death are most relevant in the circumstances of the death under investigation. Intriguingly, such difficult medical scenarios turn out to be 'complex', as well as complicated!

 

Chaos theory, and more recently complexity theory, offers an alternative way of thinking about the relevance of interrelating physiological mechanisms which might have been deranged enough to cause organ dysfunction and death.

 

In medicine we learn basic sciences in a traditional, reductive, way; we certainly examine human body functions at a body-wide scale, but mostly concentrate on the components making up the body - genetic, molecular, micro and macro anatomic features etc - and infer function (and dysfunction) from the 'bottom-up'. This might work for anatomic or physiological systems that behave in a simple linear manner (where the whole is determined by the sum of its parts), but does not fully explain behaviour of complex systems in which the behaviour of the whole is something more than that of its parts. This is the situation in familiar systems such as the host response to injury.

 

This article explores ways in which complexity thinking can enhance our understanding of 'non-linear' complex systems common to clinical medicine, and forensic pathology, and takes in applications in medical education, research, and deciding matters such as 'the cause of death'.

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Suicide - YouTube

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This short presentation from the School of Life series explores the scale and nature of suicide, and touches on the reasons why some individuals take their life, and the role that literature has in helping us understand the nature of human anguish.

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▶ Modern Slavery is closer than you think: Understanding Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking - YouTube

Modern Slavery is closer than you think.

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This is a harrowing video illustrating the phenomenon of modern slavery. When considering our patient's circumstances, could they be vulnerable due to forced labour? Would your clinical encounter identify health problems stemming from such a phenomenon? How could you help your patient in these circumstances?

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ARTNATOMY

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When an unidentified body is discovered, and visual recognition is not possible due to decomposition, fire-related damage, or trauma, forensic artists can create a facial reconstruction based on their knowledge of facial anatomy.

 

This interactive Flash-based online application will help you revise your facial muscle anatomy in a fun way! See where the main muscles are, revise their actions, and explore how the movements are co-ordinated during a range of facial expressions, such as fear, or surprise.

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Richard Jones's curator insight, June 12, 2014 1:19 PM

When an unidentified body is discovered, and visual recognition is not possible due to decomposition, fire-related damage, or trauma, forensic artists can create a facial reconstruction based on their knowledge of facial anatomy.

 

This interactive Flash-based online application will help you revise your facial muscle anatomy in a fun way! See where the main muscles are, revise their actions, and explore how the movements are co-ordinated during a range of facial expressions, such as fear, or surprise.