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Will Any Health App Ever Really Succeed?

Will Any Health App Ever Really Succeed? | For The Home | Scoop.it

There are wildly successful apps for mapping, sending e-mail, and catapulting birds. Why aren’t there any for health care?

 

Geoffrey Clapp thinks a mobile app can make health care better—so much so, in fact, that his upcoming app is called just that: Better.

 

The app is being tested at the Mayo Clinic, which is an investor in Clapp’s startup, and is slated to launch in October. It aims to let people use a smartphone to reach a doctor, find a diagnosis, or keep track of their medical records. Storing personal medical data and using health-tracking features will be free, but users will be charged monthly fees for instant access to nurses and health coaches.

 

Better, also the name of the company, is among a slew of health and fitness companies concentrating on the mobile Internet market. So far, however, health apps have failed to take off. To the disappointment of “e-health” advocates who hope to see such apps transform the medical landscape, the number of Americans using technology to track their health or fitness didn’t change between 2010 and early 2013, according to data from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

 
Via nrip
Ken Nelson's insight:

What a great idea, not before time something like this could be a life saver,and how many times do you get asked the same questions about your  health & what you are alergy to, would be great to store all this info on your phone securely of course.

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Connected Digital Health & Life's curator insight, September 28, 2013 1:58 PM

not until they realise its not about cool apps but good health, and that is a personal behavioral change!

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How To Improve Your Home with LED Lighting - Tested

How To Improve Your Home with LED Lighting - Tested | For The Home | Scoop.it
How To Improve Your Home with LED Lighting. By Loyd Case on Sept. 11, 2013 at 10:22 a.m.. Compact fluorescent lighting is now a transitional technology. Fluorescents will always have a place, but CF-style lighting is starting to fade away, ...
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The light output from LED is amazing if you havent tried them yet i can highly recommend them.

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Nectar – All The Juice You Need For Your Gadgets - MensXP.com

Nectar – All The Juice You Need For Your Gadgets - MensXP.com | For The Home | Scoop.it
MensXP.com Nectar – All The Juice You Need For Your Gadgets MensXP.com Chances are, you must be reading this right now from your snazzy smartphone while consistently sneaking a glance at your battery life and praying you don't run out of it anytime...
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An absolute must for mobile phone users,mine is always running low.

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Rescooped by Ken Nelson from healthcare technology
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Will Any Health App Ever Really Succeed?

Will Any Health App Ever Really Succeed? | For The Home | Scoop.it

There are wildly successful apps for mapping, sending e-mail, and catapulting birds. Why aren’t there any for health care?

 

Geoffrey Clapp thinks a mobile app can make health care better—so much so, in fact, that his upcoming app is called just that: Better.

 

The app is being tested at the Mayo Clinic, which is an investor in Clapp’s startup, and is slated to launch in October. It aims to let people use a smartphone to reach a doctor, find a diagnosis, or keep track of their medical records. Storing personal medical data and using health-tracking features will be free, but users will be charged monthly fees for instant access to nurses and health coaches.

 

Better, also the name of the company, is among a slew of health and fitness companies concentrating on the mobile Internet market. So far, however, health apps have failed to take off. To the disappointment of “e-health” advocates who hope to see such apps transform the medical landscape, the number of Americans using technology to track their health or fitness didn’t change between 2010 and early 2013, according to data from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

 
Via nrip
Ken Nelson's insight:

What a great idea, not before time something like this could be a life saver,and how many times do you get asked the same questions about your  health & what you are alergy to, would be great to store all this info on your phone securely of course.

more...
Connected Digital Health & Life's curator insight, September 28, 2013 1:58 PM

not until they realise its not about cool apps but good health, and that is a personal behavioral change!