FoodieDoc says:
2.9K views | +0 today
Follow
FoodieDoc says:
Food, Nutrition, Health, Safety, and Good Eats: Science-based Information a Foodie Needs to Know. AnnaResurreccion@gmail.com
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Cardiologist: High fructose corn syrup is 'one of the most misunderstood food ingredients'

Cardiologist: High fructose corn syrup is 'one of the most misunderstood food ingredients' | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

Cardiologist: High fructose corn syrup is 'one of the most misunderstood food ingredients'

 

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is “one of the most misunderstood food ingredients”, and continues to be lambasted in the media and on the internet long after the scientific debate over its relative contribution to the obesity epidemic vs sugar has run its course, says food industry consultant and cardiologist Dr James Rippe.

 

Dr. Rippe states: "There is no longer any debate."

 

http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Regulation/Cardiologist-High-fructose-corn-syrup-is-one-of-the-most-misunderstood-food-ingredients

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

New Analysis Reveals What We Eat Defines Who We Are

New Analysis Reveals What We Eat Defines Who We Are | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

We really are what we eat, according to new research from Horsham, PA-based SAI Marketing Inc., which described how food has become a class marker separating consumers into two distinct groups: Food Elitists and Food Realists.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

GMOs and Junk Science: Apocalypse Soon If Not Now - Forbes

GMOs and Junk Science: Apocalypse Soon If Not Now - Forbes | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
It’s a powerful irony. If recent assaults by environmental activists on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) prevail, the impact on the environment will be disastrous.

 

...One recent assault on GMOs that has captured international attention typifies the fight we’ve got on our hands. This study, published on September 19, purportedly shows that rats who were fed genetically modified maize sprayed with a weed-killer, or who drank water with specific levels of that weed-killer, were much likelier to develop tumors that block organ function, and to die earlier than rodents in a control group. (Both the corn and the weed-killer are produced by Monsanto, perennially at the epicenter of the ongoing GM controversy.)

 

The study came as quite a surprise to scientists. Reputable regulatory and health agencies in the U.S. and EU that have looked closely at GMOs found them safe, as have the National Academy of Sciences and the British Royal Academy.

 

As the experts scrutinized the new study, they found quite a bit to question....

 

[Interesting POV by Richard Levick and debate - JD]


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Annals of Internal Medicine | Are Organic Foods Safer or Healthier Than Conventional Alternatives?: A Systematic Review

Annals of Internal Medicine | Are Organic Foods Safer or Healthier Than Conventional Alternatives?: A Systematic Review | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

Scientists analyze organic vs. conventional meat, produceA study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows that organic fruits, vegetables, and meat may be no more nutritious than their conventional counterparts. Nor were they any less likely to be contaminated by dangerous bacteria like E. coli.

 

In the meta-analysis study, researchers combined data from 237 studies, examining a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and meats. For four years, they performed statistical analyses looking for signs of health benefits from adding organic foods to the diet.

 

One finding of the study was that organic produce, over all, contained higher levels of phosphorus than conventional produce. But because almost everyone gets adequate phosphorus from a wide variety of foods, according to the researchers, the higher levels in the organic produce are unlikely to confer any health benefit.

 

The organic produce also contained more compounds known as phenols, believed to help prevent cancer, than conventional produce. While the difference was statistically significant, the size of the difference varied widely from study to study, and the data was based on the testing of small numbers of samples. Other variables, like ripeness, had a greater influence on nutrient content. Thus, a lush peach grown with the use of pesticides could easily contain more vitamins than an unripe organic one.

 

Over all, the researchers concluded that 38% of conventional produce tested in the studies contained detectable residues, compared with 7% for the organic produce. They also noted a couple of studies that showed that children who ate organic produce had fewer pesticide traces in their urine. However, the levels were almost always under the allowed safety limits by the Environmental Protection Agency.

 

Similarly, organic meat contained considerably lower levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria than conventionally-raised animals did, but bacteria, antibiotic-resistant or otherwise, would be killed during cooking.

 

On the study’s results, the Organic Trade Association’s (OTA) Executive Director and CEO Christine Bushway said: “Consumers seeking to minimize their exposure to pesticide residues will find that foods bearing the USDA Organic label are the gold standard. This is because organic foods have the least chemicals applied in their production and the least residues in the final products. And, because organic livestock practices forbid the use of antibiotics, including the routine use of low level antibiotics for growth, organic meat contains less antibiotic-resistant bacteria.”

 

Abstract

OTA statement

http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1355685

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Human Whey Promotes Sessile Bacterial Growth, Whereas Alternative Sources of Infant Nutrition Promote Planktonic Growth

"Breast milk protects neonates from infections, prevents allergies, enhances cognitive and social development, and guards against later development of illnesses including multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes."

 

Breast milk may promote growth of beneficial gut floraA study published in Current Nutrition & Food Science shows that breast milk may promote more beneficial growth of gut flora—the colonies of friendly bacteria that help absorb nutrients and develop the immune system—than infant formula, according to an article in Medical News Today.

 

For the study, the researchers grew cultures of bacteria in cow’s milk, infant formula, and human breast milk. For the cow’s milk they used whole milk sold in grocery stores, for the infant formula they used three popular brands of milk and soy-based products. The breast milk was donated by volunteers.

 

The researchers separated the breast milk into various components, including proteins, fats, and carbohydrates. In addition, they ran tests comparing breast milk with a purified form of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), infant formulas, and cow’s milk. SIgA is an antibody that is abundant in human breast milk, and helps develop the infant’s immune system.

 

They incubated the SIgA, cow’s milk, human breast milk, and infant formulas with two strains of E. coli, two types of bacteria that are essential for the early development of gut flora colonies. They are friendly relatives of the E. coli bacteria that cause food poisoning.

The colonies developed differently in each sample. In the human breast milk sample, the bacteria clung together and formed biofilms: an essential layer of flora that acts as a barrier against pathogens and infection. This did not happen in the cow’s milk and infant formula samples: the bacteria in those cultures grew prolifically, but as individual organisms, more like plankton that you find in the ocean than a biofilm of associated cells. In the SIgA sample, the results were in between the two, suggesting SIgA on its own is not enough to cause aggregation that is enough to make a biofilm.

 

The researchers concluded that human breast milk uses “multiple mechanisms to facilitate bacterial association.” In contrast, infant formula and cow’s milk encourage more plankton-like colonies of bacteria. The authors suggest the study gives some important clues about how human milk might protect against infections and illnesses. The findings could also help develop infant formula that is better at mimicking nature.

 

Abstract

http://www.benthamdirect.org/pages/b_viewarticle.php?articleID=3180618

 

Medical News Today article

 

 

 

 

 

...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

R&D challenge: Developing texture-modified foods for the elderly

R&D challenge: Developing texture-modified foods for the elderly | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Texture-modified foods for the elderly are likely to become an important area for R&D in the coming years as the population ages – but there are many challenges to producing foods that provide all the nutrition elderly people need that are still...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

The Truth About Agave

The Truth About Agave | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Agave has become a popular sweetener for people looking for natural alternatives to white sugar and high-fructose corn syrup. But is agave really any more healthy?

 

One of the most celebrated properties of agave is its profile on the glycemic index, a scale that measures how much various foods raise blood sugar levels. Agave ranks lower than many other sweeteners on the glycemic index. As a result, some manufacturers tout it as a "diabetic friendly" sugar. But, according to Clemens, President of the Institute of Food Tecnologists, "there is inconsistent evidence to assign a glycemic value to any food, and it should not be used as a green light for diabetics."

 

In fact, the American Diabetes Association lists agave along with other sweeteners (table sugar, honey, brown sugar, molasses, fructose, maple sugar, and confectioner’s sugar) that should be limited in diabetic diets.

 

Is 'Natural' Sugar Better?

Experts agree: The American diet contains way too much sugar, especially in the form of sweetened beverages.

 

One of the simplest ways to improve the healthfulness of your diet is to reduce the amount of all simple sugars -- agave, sucrose, honey, maple syrup, raw sugar, molasses, brown sugar, corn syrup, turbinado sugar, and more. When it comes to sweeteners, the choice is yours -- but keep in mind that all caloric sugars are virtually the same.

 

It's better to satisfy your sweet tooth with whole fruit than with any kind of concentrated sugar. Not only is it unprocessed, and fiber- and nutrient-rich, it has an even lower glycemic index than agave.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Research finds Filipinos most active in sourcing web food deals

Research finds Filipinos most active in sourcing web food deals | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Forget Facebook and Twitter, Internet users in the Philippines are the most active in the Asia-Pacific region in going online for groceries and food products, a new survey has revealed.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion from Le Marche and Food
Scoop.it!

Celebrate the end of summer with Spiedini and Arrosticini

Celebrate the end of summer with Spiedini and Arrosticini | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

Italians love to grill all kinds of food, and we've already seen ways to grill steak, chicken, lamb, rabbit, pork, fish, shellfish, mollusks and vegetables not to mention the ne plus ultra of Italian grilling, the grigliata mista.
Spiedini:  in the usual Italian manner, the use of herbs is subtle and spices are few and far between, all the better to let the pure flavors of the ingredients, intensified by the heat of the fire, shine through.
The great advantage of the spiedino is that it gives you a variety of meats and vegetables in a single serving. Almost any sort of meat or vegetable lends itself to the task, but a few favorite combinations include:

Chicken and sausage Chicken and pancetta Beef, sausage and bread

The sausage can be mild or spicy. And any of the above combinations can be interspersed with vegetables: onion, bell pepper (red, green or yellow, or a combination) and medium-sized mushrooms, cherry tomatoes and young zucchini. For the adventurous, spiedini can also include (exclusively or in combination with other meats) organ meats like kidney, pork liver or coratella, translated into English as the 'pluck'—lungs, heart and trachea.
To prepare a spiedino, cut your ingredients into bite-sized pieces and 'thread' them snuggly on a skewer, leaving room both at the bottom and at the tip. Onions and bell peppers need to be trimmed, the onion's layers separated and the seeds and ribs of the pepper removed. It's best to alternate lean and fat meats, so the fat meats can 'baste' the lean, and to alternate them with vegetables for extra flavor.
Once the kebobs are assembled, lay them flat on a large plate and season them with olive oil, salt and pepper. For a bit of spice, try some red pepper flakes as well.
Lay the spiedini on a moderate flame. You want the meat to brown nicely on the outside, but the flame should not be too high, or they will brown (or even burn) on the outside before the insides are properly cooked. Baste them (lightly) with olive oil as you go.
When the spiedini are done, transfer them (careful, they're hot!) to a serving dish and season them again. To serve each diner, slip the pieces off a few at a time with a fork onto the plate.

Arrosticini: Arrosticini are a type of lamb kebob unique to the Abruzzo region. You cut lamb (either leg or shoulder will do well) into small cubes, then thread them onto a smallish skewer. (Ideally, they should all line up to create a perfectly uniform lamb rectangle, but that's beyond my capacity for patience and precision.) Season the lamb with olive oil, salt, pepper and rosemary sprigs, which you can lay atop and below the skewers like so:
Leave the arrosticini to marinate for several hours. They are cooked over a moderate-high flame and, if you've cut your lamb into small enough pieces, will take no time at all, about 2 minutes per side. They should be nicely browned on the outside, but still juicy inside.
Season again before serving, with lemon wedges. Unlike regular kebobs, arrosticini are typically eaten right off the skewer.


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Add some extra flavor to your garden with herbs | The Jamestown Sun | Jamestown, North Dakota

Add some extra flavor to your garden with herbs | The Jamestown Sun | Jamestown, North Dakota | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
One of the essential parts of a garden is the addition of the many different types of herbs that can be intermixed among the many other plants growing in harmony.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion from Food issues
Scoop.it!

What will the Salmonella Cantaloupe and Mango Numbers Be?

What will the Salmonella Cantaloupe and Mango Numbers Be? | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

Via Cathryn Wellner
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion from Food and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

Aguaje: the Amazon’s New Superfruit Secret Is Out

Aguaje: the Amazon’s New Superfruit Secret Is Out | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

"Researchers have stumbled upon yet another reason to save the Amazon rainforest. The aguaje fruit is just another nutrient-rich, pulpy gem with the potential to gain as much popularity as the now familiar acai berry or guarana extract. Local people living within the Peruvian Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve have cultivated this fruit, and a variety of others, as part of their culture. At the local market in the city of Iquitos, this small, scaly fruit generates US$4.6 million every year. But as global trends continue to rise in favor of unique, healthful food choices, the aguaje holds the capability to generate income for local growers and amp up Vitamin A intake for consumers around the world."

 

Today's new superfruit.


Via Norman Warthmann, Jeremy Cherfas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion from Food issues
Scoop.it!

Cantaloupes Linked To Deadly Outbreak AGAIN

Cantaloupes Linked To Deadly Outbreak AGAIN | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Aug 17 (Reuters) - A salmonella outbreak blamed on cantaloupe grown in Indiana has killed two people in Kentucky and sickened some 150 people in the past month, health officials said on Friday, urging consumers to throw away melons bought ...

Via Cathryn Wellner
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Presentation fan ifpri us africa forum june 11 2012

Click to edit Master title style Meeting the Food and Nutrition Demands of an Urbanizing Africa Shenggen Fan Director General | International Food Policy Resear...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Antioxidant-Rich Foods Cut Heart Risk, Supplements Do Not, Say Researchers

Antioxidant-Rich Foods Cut Heart Risk, Supplements Do Not, Say Researchers | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

Heere is breaking news:   Antioxidant-Rich Foods Cut Heart Risk, Supplements Do Not, Say Researchers

 

Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have declared that a diet including seven servings of antioxidant-rich fruit and vegetables per day can decrease a woman's risk of heart attack by 20-29%.

 

FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion

 

http://www.nutraceuticalsworld.com/contents/view_breaking-news/2012-09-24/antioxidant-rich-foods-cut-heart-risk-supplements-/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Meat & Poultry | USDA SuperTracker adds calorie targeting

Meat & Poultry | USDA SuperTracker adds calorie targeting | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

 

With one in three Americans overweight or obese, resources like SuperTracker play a critical role in helping people to develop good health and nutrition habits,” said Kevin Concannon, Agriculture Undersecretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services. “This update allows individuals to set goals tailored to their specific needs and improve their overall health and well-being.”

 

SuperTracker, which is maintained by the USDA’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, is free to use and available at ChooseMyPlate.gov.

 

SuperTracker assigns users a calorie level based on information entered in their user profile such as age, height, weight and physical activity level. The new feature allows users to tailor their diet and exercise regimens to fit calorie target recommendations made by their physician. To access the new personal calorie goal feature, go to SuperTracker and click on My Features (My Top 5 Goals).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

What’s the bottom line: Is red meat healthy or not? | Eating Well

What’s the bottom line: Is red meat healthy or not? | Eating Well | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Discover eating well - with healthy recipes, healthy eating, healthy cooking, healthy diet recipes, weight loss recipes and healthy menus from EatingWell Magazine.

 

Praised by Paleo Diet advocates and shunned by vegetarians, red meat certainly is a controversial food. And that controversy extends into the research world, where red meat and its impact on our health has been the subject of numerous studies…with conflicting results. On the one hand, red meat offers clear nutritional benefits. Red meat (like beef, bison and lamb) provides good-quality protein and is also rich in nutrients, such as energy-supplying iron, zinc and vitamin B12 and immunity-supporting selenium. It also, however, harbors saturated fat. And then there are these other pros and cons, which Jessica Girdwain reported on for the September/October issue of EatingWell Magazine.

Related: Best Protein Choices for You and the Planet

 

PRO: May protect your heart
When 36 people with high cholesterol following a diet of mostly fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes ate 4 to 5.5 ounces of lean beef a day, they lowered their “bad” LDL cholesterol by about 10 percent, writes researcher Michael Roussell, Ph.D., in the January 2012 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. What’s more, the fat content—called triglycerides—inside their HDL particles decreased, which may help HDL particles to better scavenge excess cholesterol and carry it out of the bloodstream. Roussell attributes his findings to beef’s unique fat profile. Beef contains two fats—stearic acid, a saturated fat, and oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat (also found in olive oil)—that have been shown to help improve cholesterol levels. However, beef also contains other kinds of saturated fat—like palmitic acid and myristic acid—that raise cholesterol.

 

CON: May increase mortality

A March 2012 study from Harvard found that eating one serving (3 oz.) per day of red meat is associated with a 13 percent higher risk of death. Eat one serving of processed red meat daily (like two slices of bacon or one hot dog) and that risk jumps to 20 percent. Researchers think that could possibly be due to red meat’s saturated fat and cholesterol content as well as the sodium and nitrates in processed varieties. (The authors point out that they didn’t differentiate between lean and fatty cuts, so it’s unknown whether lean meat possesses less risk.)

 

PRO: May lift your mood
In a new Australian study, women who reported eating 1 to 2 ounces of beef or lamb a day were half as likely to have major depression or anxiety disorder compared to those who ate less than 1 ounce daily. That may be because beef and lamb in Australia are typically grass-fed, “which means their meat is higher in omega-3 fatty acids, which appear to be protective against anxiety and depression,” says lead author Felice Jacka, Ph.D., of Deakin University’s School of Medicine.

Must Read: 5 Foods That Boost Your Mood

CON: May increase cancer risk
Because grilling meat doesn’t require added fat to cook, it’s a waistline-friendly cooking method. The bad news? As the drippings melt off and hit the fire below, compounds called heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are created and drift back up into the meat. Research has linked HCAs to cancer, says Roussell. Try adding dried rosemary to your favorite marinade before grilling, which one study in The Journal of Food Science found reduced the formation of HCAs by 60 percent. And avoid eating the crispy, charred bits.

 

Don’t Miss: The Best Healthy Cheap Cuts of Meat

 

Bottom Line:
So what to do with all this information? If you like red meat, eat it in moderation. Two 3- to 4-ounce portions of red meat per week is considered healthy, says Roussell. To keep calories and saturated fat in check, buy lean cuts, such as flank steak, New York strip and tenderloin, and trim off excess fat.

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

How Obesity Threatens America's Future TFAH2012FasInFat18.pdf

The study found that if obesity rates continue on their current trajectories, by 2030, 13 states could have adult obesity rates above 60%, 39 states could have rates above 50%, and all 50 states could have rates above 44%.

 

By 2030, Mississippi could have the highest obesity rate at 66.7%, and Colorado could have the lowest rate for any state at 44.8%. According to the latest data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), obesity rates in 2011 ranged from a high of 34.9% in Mississippi to a low of 20.7% in Colorado.

 

If states’ obesity rates continue on their current trajectories, the number of new cases of type2 diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke, hypertension, and arthritis could increase 10 times between 2010 and 2020—and double again by 2030.

 

In addition, obesity could contribute to more than 6 million cases of type2 diabetes, 5 million cases of coronary heart disease and stroke, and more than 400,000 cases of cancer in the next two decades.

 

http://www.healthyamericans.org/assets/files/TFAH2012FasInFat18.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Maternal vitamin D backed to help build better baby brain

Maternal vitamin D backed to help build better baby brain | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Mothers with low levels of vitamin D are more likely to have children with slower brain development and lower mental and motor skills, warn researchers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Medscape: ARSENIC IN RICE

From WebMD Health News

Arsenic Found in Rice at High Levels

Brenda Goodman, MA

Authors and Disclosures

Print This Email thisShare

 

September 19, 2012 —

 

Arsenic is found in a wide variety of rice and rice products, sometimes at levels that are higher than safe limits set for drinking water, new tests confirm.

Separate test results were released on Wednesday by Consumer Reports, the FDA, and by Lisa Madigan, the attorney general for the state of Illinois. Madigan has been testing rice products as part of a state investigation into arsenic in food.

 

Based on its tests of 60 products, Consumer Reports says kids and adults should watch how much rice they eat from various sources (like rice milk and rice cereal) to lower their exposure to arsenic, which has been linked to cancer, heart disease, and poor brain function in young children.

“First and foremost, I want to warn parents that every rice cereal product we tested contained arsenic. These results are shocking because rice cereal is often a baby’s first solid food,” Madigan says. “Parents and caregivers should moderate the amount of rice products they feed their children.”

 

The FDA’s tests of 200 different rice products show levels of harmful inorganic arsenic that are in line with tests performed by Consumer Reports. The magazine analyzed rice products including infant cereals, regular boxed cereals, rice cakes, rice milk, and brown and white rice. Both organic and nonorganic rice products were found to have arsenic.

 

Eating one serving of rice at the highest levels found in the studies could expose a person to more arsenic than the EPA allows in drinking water.

 

Based on their findings, Consumer Reports and Madigan have called on the FDA to set limits on arsenic in rice and rice products.

The agency says the issue needs more study. They are continuing to check rice products, with a goal of testing 1,200 by the end of this year. For the time being, regulators say there’s not enough evidence to tell people to limit rice in their diets.

 

“Our advice right now is that consumers should continue to eat a balanced diet that includes a wide variety of grains -- not only for good nutrition but also to minimize any potential consequences from consuming any one particular food,” says FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, MD.

 

Rice Growers Respond

Rice producers fired back at Consumer Reports. In a lengthy rebuttal posted on the USA Rice Federation web site, they called the magazine’s investigation “incomplete and inaccurate.”

“We believe rice is safe and it’s premature for CR to call on consumers to limit their intake of rice. FDA agrees,” says Stacy Fitzgerald-Redd, a spokeswoman for USA Rice.

The statement points out that there are no established studies directly connecting eating rice with bad health effects.

That’s true, but only because those studies “simply haven’t been conducted,” says Andrew Meharg, PhD, chair of plant and soil science at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland.

Heath Effects at Lower Levels Uncertain

At high levels, arsenic causes discoloration of the skin, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, numbness, paralysis, and blindness.

But at the low levels most people are exposed to through food and drinking water, the dangers are less clear. People who drink water with moderate levels of arsenic -- higher than levels typically seen in the U.S. supply -- over a long period of time have higher rates of bladder, lung, and skin cancers. Long-term exposure has also been linked to heart disease, and in children, to problems with learning and IQ.

Because arsenic is naturally found in the soil, water, and air, it’s also found in many fruits and vegetables. Rice is uniquely vulnerable to contamination with arsenic, however, because it’s grown in flooded fields. Rice plants soak it up through their roots and store it in the grains.

 

“The arsenic levels measured in rice are relatively high. They are higher than levels measured in other grains such as flour products or than those measured in fruit juice,” says Ana Navas-Acien, MD, PhD, an associate professor of environmental health sciences at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Md.

 

Her analysis of government nutrition data found that people who eat one rice food item have arsenic levels that were about 44% higher than those who didn’t. People who reported eating two or more items had 70% higher arsenic levels than those who had none.

“I believe it is time to set standards in food, as well as to monitor arsenic levels in food, and to find methods to minimize arsenic exposure through dietary intake, especially rice,” she tells WebMD.

 

Advice for Consumers

To lower your exposure to arsenic, Consumer Reports offers these tips:

Test your water. If your home is not on a public water system, have your water tested for arsenic and lead.Change the way you cook rice.

 

Boiling rice with more water than you need and draining it afterward removes about 30% of the inorganic arsenic. Try using a ratio of 1 cup of rice to 6 cups of water.Eat a varied diet.

 

Some vegetables accumulate arsenic when grown in contaminated soil. To help, clean vegetables thoroughly, especially potato skins.Eat other grains. Wheat and oats have lower levels of arsenic than rice. For those who need to eat gluten-free, quinoa, millet, and amaranth may be better options.

 

SOURCES:

Consumer Reports: “Arsenic in Your Food.”

News release, Consumer Reports.

FDA: "Arsenic Data Analysis."

News release, FDA.

News release, Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan.

Stacy Fitzgerald-Redd, spokeswoman, USA Rice Federation, Arlington, Va.

Andrew Meharg, PhD, chair of plant and soil science, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Ana Navas-Acien, MD, PhD, associate professor of environmental health sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion from Food and Nutrition
Scoop.it!

WHO | Obesity and overweight

WHO | Obesity and overweight | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

In 2008, more than 1.4 billion adults, 20 and older, were overweight. Of these over 200 million men and nearly 300 million women were obese.
65% of the world's population live in countries where overweight and obesity kills more people than underweight.


Via Jeremy Cherfas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Seriously Asian: Bitter Melon | Serious Eats : Recipes

Seriously Asian: Bitter Melon | Serious Eats : Recipes | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
[Photos: Chichi Wang] If I were to write the Nasty Bits column for vegetables, bitter melon would be at the top of my list of underappreciated vegetables that take some getting used to. Though most of the squash or melon...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion from Wines and People
Scoop.it!

Matching Wine with Food – An Easy Guide

Matching Wine with Food – An Easy Guide | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

A dinner party is all about good food, great company and a relaxed atmosphere. And part of creating a relaxed atmosphere is to have on hand some gorgeous, big flavoured wines, that compliment what your guests are consuming. Trouble is, it can be very easy to match a delicate dish of sea food with a wine that is too robust, and overpowers all the intricate flavours. Or it is just as simple to serve a light, refreshing wine with a dish that is too meaty and requires something with a bit more depth. So how you do match your wines with your food unless you go round tasting them all before you serve them? There are a few rules and tips that you can adhere to that always work when matching wine and food. The old advice to give a red wine with red meats still holds true and to serve a white with seafood, fish and poultry is fine. But if you really want to enhance the flavours of your cooking, take a look at what we suggest, and your dinner parties will be all the better for it!...

 

...With chicken and pork, you can serve slightly more robust whites or even light reds, depending on what sauces and herbs are accompanying the dishes. With rich sauces I would suggest a crisp white, such as Moncaro Verdicchio del Castelli di Jesi Classico, 2011. A gorgeous white with palate cleansing properties and a crisp finish....


Read all


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion from Le Marche and Food
Scoop.it!

Butta La Pasta!...

Butta La Pasta!... | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

I like pasta; I like it a lot. Barely a week goes by without at least one pasta dish gracing our dinner table. And therein lies the problem; its very ubiquity. Being seen as a cheap choice, or a quick fix, serve to diminish its lustre and turn it into mid week meal fodder for those times when you can barely be bothered to boil the kettle and pop open a jar of pesto.

My recent trip to Italy served as the perfect opportunity to become acquainted with the simple delights of dough again. Wherever you go, from the high up in the Alps to the heel of the boot, you will find it on every dinner table. It may come in different shapes (or the same shapes with different names), dried or fresh, stuffed or with sauce, but it will always be there, made with an understated love and care that elevates it far above merely flour and water.

Here's some of the highlights we sampled on our travels in Tuscany, Umbria, Le Marche and San Marino.

Full Article


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anna V. A. Resurreccion
Scoop.it!

Get Rid Of-Ants, Ants, Ants Recipe - Food.com - 203233

Get Rid Of-Ants, Ants, Ants Recipe - Food.com - 203233 | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

ANTS BOTHERING YOU?  I came across this.  Can't vouch for it but the reviews are great.  Let me know about your success--FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion 

 

This is a miracle recipe for getting rid of those pesty ants that come every spring and summer. Mix up the solution, pack cotton balls in a jar cover, and put the solution on and they will be gone.

more...
No comment yet.