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One-Quarter of World’s Agriculture Grows in Highly Water-Stressed Areas | World Resources Institute

One-Quarter of World’s Agriculture Grows in Highly Water-Stressed Areas | World Resources Institute | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
A new interactive map from WRI’s Aqueduct project reveals that more than 25 percent of the world’s agriculture is grown in areas of high water stress.

Via AgEcoBlog, Aquanue
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danger signs!

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Researchers say they have invented non-allergenic peanuts

Researchers say they have invented non-allergenic peanuts | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
A non-GMO, hypo-allergenic peanut butter could be in stores "in the near future."

Via Anna V. A. Resurreccion, gireesan
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Anna V. A. Resurreccion's curator insight, August 30, 2014 6:05 PM

Peanut allergies affect an extremely small proportion of the population, 1-2% at most.  However, the results can be fatal and as such, pose a serious threat.  The incidence appears to be on the increase.   

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Researchers say they have invented non-allergenic peanuts

Researchers say they have invented non-allergenic peanuts | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
A non-GMO, hypo-allergenic peanut butter could be in stores "in the near future."

Via Anna V. A. Resurreccion
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Anna V. A. Resurreccion's curator insight, August 30, 2014 6:05 PM

Peanut allergies affect an extremely small proportion of the population, 1-2% at most.  However, the results can be fatal and as such, pose a serious threat.  The incidence appears to be on the increase.   

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Test on GMO rice ‘technically invalid,’ university says - Hürriyet (2013)

Test on GMO rice ‘technically invalid,’ university says - Hürriyet (2013) | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it

Rice seized in southern Turkey may have been inadequately analyzed, officials announced May 8. The rectorate of Istanbul Technical University (İTÜ) stated that the bio-genetic research center that performed the tests has made some mistakes during the experiment. “The methods of experiment carried out are not suitable to assess if the GMO allegedly found in the rice was not caused by... contamination. Hence, the results are technically invalid” ...  

Turkey’s Food, Agriculture and Livestock Ministry had dismissed allegations of any GMO food entering the country... “No trace of GMOs was detected in rice in any of our inspections,” the ministry said in a statement. İTÜ’s direction also said that an investigation had been launched into the person who carried out the experiments... 

Food and Agriculture Minister Mehdi Eker had said that laboratory results were wrong... “There is no such thing as GMO rice production in the world. There was some contamination... It is not related to the product” ...


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 “The methods of experiment carried out are not suitable to assess if the GMO allegedly found in the rice was not caused by... contamination. Hence, the results are technically invalid” ...  

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Preparing synthetic biology for the world

Preparing synthetic biology for the world | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it

Synthetic Biology promises low-cost, exponentially scalable products and global health solutions in the form of self-replicating organisms, or “living devices.” As these promises are realized, proof-of-concept systems will gradually migrate from tightly regulated laboratory or industrial environments into private spaces as, for instance, probiotic health products, food, and even do-it-yourself bioengineered systems. What additional steps, if any, should be taken before releasing engineered self-replicating organisms into a broader user space?


Via Gerd Moe-Behrens, Szabolcs Kósa
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Synthetic Biology promises low-cost, exponentially scalable products and global health solutions in the form of self-replicating organisms, or “living devices.” As these promises are realized, proof-of-concept systems will gradually migrate from tightly regulated laboratory or industrial environments into private spaces as, for instance, probiotic health products, food, and even do-it-yourself bioengineered systems.

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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, January 25, 2013 2:19 PM

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Gerd H. G. Moe-Behrens, Rene Davis and Karmella A. Haynes

"Synthetic Biology promises low-cost, exponentially scalable products and global health solutions in the form of self-replicating organisms, or “living devices.” As these promises are realized, proof-of-concept systems will gradually migrate from tightly regulated laboratory or industrial environments into private spaces as, for instance, probiotic health products, food, and even do-it-yourself bioengineered systems. What additional steps, if any, should be taken before releasing engineered self-replicating organisms into a broader user space? In this review, we explain how studies of genetically modified organisms lay groundwork for the future landscape of biosafety. Early in the design process, biological engineers are anticipating potential hazards and developing innovative tools to mitigate risk. Here, we survey lessons learned, ongoing efforts to engineer intrinsic biocontainment, and how different stakeholders in synthetic biology can act to accomplish best practices for biosafety."

http://bit.ly/W8eV9J

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La valeur nutritionnelle importe plus que le nombre de calories ingérées

La valeur nutritionnelle importe plus que le nombre de calories ingérées | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
Les experts le confirment : pour améliorer la santé du coeur et lutter contre l'obésité, il est temps d'oublier une bonne fois pour toutes le comptage des calories pour se focaliser sur la valeur nutritionnelle réelle des aliments.De simples ...

Via internationalolivecouncil
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Experts confirm: to improve heart health and fight against obesity, it's time to forget once and for all counting calories to focus on the real nutritional value of foods.

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Food Safety Modernization Act

Food Safety Modernization Act | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
Mon 8/26/13 Noon 7PM New food safety laws will soon change the way farmers and producers operate.

Via Jimmy Lim
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 New food safety laws will soon change the way farmers and producers operate.

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Blind cave fish evolved a shrunken brain to save energy

Blind cave fish evolved a shrunken brain to save energy | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
The Mexican tetra lost its eyes - as well as a significant portion of its brain - to ensure survival in a subterranean environment

Via Perendale Publishers (Tuti Tan)
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smart dumb fish

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Gold cheese please! - Blottr

Gold cheese please! - Blottr | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
BlottrGold cheese please!BlottrCheesemakers from Leicestershire have unveiled a brand new Stilton cheese for Christmas, which costs 67 times more expensive than the average Stilton.

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Man with the golden cheese

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Avocado Nutrition Facts | Information About Nutrition Health Benefits

Avocado Nutrition Facts | Information About Nutrition Health Benefits | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it

Avocado Nutrition Facts The avocado (Persea gratissima or P. americana) originated in Puebla, Mexico and its earliest use dates back to 10,000 years B.C. Since AD 900, the avocado tree has been cultivated and grown in Central and South America. The avocado, also called the alligator pear, is a... http://awesome-body.info/avocado-nutrition-facts/


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incredible benefits

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Secrets of a Superstar Herb

Secrets of a Superstar Herb | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it

Scientists and doctors are recommending this powerful herb for conditions tied to inflammation, including: http://turmeric.purehealthorigins.com/benefits/anti-inflammatory/secrets-of-superstar-herb/


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T U R M E R I C

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FVO finds shortcomings in Dutch fish products control - FoodQualityNews.com

FVO finds shortcomings in Dutch fish products control - FoodQualityNews.com | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
The Netherlands has a control system for fish products but addressing shortcomings in sampling for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), additives and histamine could improve it, found a Food and Veterinary Office (FVO) audit.
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Food Labeling for Companies Manufacturing or Distributing Food in China - Food Safety Magazine

Food Labeling for Companies Manufacturing or Distributing Food in China - Food Safety Magazine | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
Enforcement of laws relating to food labeling is also becoming stricter in China.
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food labeling for dragon

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Fish Changes Color in a Flash, Scientists Discover

Fish Changes Color in a Flash, Scientists Discover | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
Octopuses, squid, and chameleons can do it. And now, it turns out that a fish can do it too. The rockpool goby is the latest animal discovered to have the ability to change their color and the brig...

Via Perendale Publishers (Tuti Tan)
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changing   C O L O R S by fish ...............Octopuses, squid, and chameleons can do it. And now, it turns out that a fish can do it too. The rockpool goby is the latest animal discovered to have the ability to change their color and the brig...

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Researchers say they have invented non-allergenic peanuts

Researchers say they have invented non-allergenic peanuts | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
A non-GMO, hypo-allergenic peanut butter could be in stores "in the near future."

Via Anna V. A. Resurreccion, gireesan
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non GMO hypo allergic peanut 

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Anna V. A. Resurreccion's curator insight, August 30, 2014 6:05 PM

Peanut allergies affect an extremely small proportion of the population, 1-2% at most.  However, the results can be fatal and as such, pose a serious threat.  The incidence appears to be on the increase.   

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Medical robotics: Would you trust a robot with a scalpel?

Medical robotics: Would you trust a robot with a scalpel? | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it

They can improve precision in surgery making it less invasive and speeding recovery; and in palliative care monitor vital signs and improve quality of life. The challenge now is to win over the patients

 

 

 

 

Driverless cars? Google has already wheeled one out. Robo-cops? Prototypes are on the scene. Love-bots? One in six people say they would have sex with an android. But how many people would want to go under the knife of a robo-surgeon?

It might seem like a solution dreamed up by Aldous Huxley, but it’s already a reality. Since 2000, more than two million operations worldwide have been performed by about 3,000 da Vinci surgical robots. While each one fills a decent-sized room, their “hands” are super-small, high-precision instruments. Now researchers are racing to develop the next generation of surgical robots to help to seek and destroy cancers, set bones or even just a hold a camera during an operation.

It might conjure up an image of Star Wars’ C-3PO in scrubs, but many of these medical machines are actually closer to the robots used to build your car. “It’s not that the robots do any of the surgery themselves,” says Tony Belpaeme, professor of cognitive systems and robotics at Plymouth University. “They are instruments for the surgeons to use for keyhole surgery, as they offer greater precision than handheld tools, particularly in hard-to-access parts of the body such as close to the spinal cord, and recovery is then so much faster because the operation is so precise.”

Not that a lack of automation is anything to be sniffy about; these machines still use powerful computers to carry out difficult jobs. Their lack of automation is down to the technological challenges of giving a robot the skill and judgment of a surgeon, as well as the lurking fear of legal action and even just the desirable reassurance of having an expert on hand for those awful “what-ifs”.

Where the researchers are taking their cue from the seriously sexy technology of driverless cars is, for example, in the development of domestic robots for palliative care, be it helping you make a cup of tea or alerting the doctor if you skip your medication. “I don’t see any application for artificial intelligence during surgery at the moment,” says Belpaeme. “For a computer to do something intelligent, it has to be able to see what’s happening. Now that’s OK in a structured environment, but the operating theatre is just a mess to a computer and it will be very hard for it to make sensible decisions. However, I do see a role in the future for more autonomous robots giving surgeons a helping hand as an assistant during operation.”

Initially, the vision behind the da Vinci robot was that a surgeon in London could operate in safety on a sick child in Liberia or a wounded soldier in Afghanistan, but financial, technological and communication worries have, for the present, put paid to such dreams. Now the promise of medical robotics lies in facilitating operations that are quicker and more accurate, meaning shorter hospital stays, greater patient turnover, lower chances of patients catching hospital superbugs and an overall saving of money. Robots in the home offer further support, keeping patients eating, moving and medicating.

For surgeons, who are often backing the development of these robots, the benefits of a machine like the da Vinci system are manifold. “The natural instinct of a surgeon is to be hands on the patients, so sitting at a console staring at a screen controlling a robot does take some getting used to,” says Pardeep Kumar, consultant urological surgeon at the Royal Marsden, London, who regularly operates using the da Vinci robot. “But it is such an immersive experience that I’ve been able to carry out more operations, more quickly and successfully than I could have dreamed of. I just bumped into one of my patients being discharged three to four days after an operation using the robot, instead of the three to four weeks it would have taken in the past.”

But it isn’t just about high precision. “The physical demands of surgery aren’t talked about much,” says Kumar. “As a surgeon I have vowed to keep going until I am in my mid to late fifties, but the strain on the neck, shoulders and back make it difficult to keep going for much longer than that. However, operating sitting down using a robot means I could keep going for longer than I had thought.”

 

 

 

It isn’t just keyhole surgery that can benefit from cutting-edge tech. Sanja Dogramadzi, a reader in robotics in the department of engineering design and mathematics at the University of the West of England, is a pioneers of medical robotic technology for the operating theatre. In collaboration with Professor Roger Atkins, an orthopaedic surgeon at University Hospitals Bristol, she designed what is believed to be the first robot-assisted system to tackle the problem of complex joint fractures. For her, the attraction of medical robotics is about solving complex problems that can change lives: “Medical robotics has lots of potential to transform the quality of life of every single one of us. If you can put bones back together, then people can walk again. What’s more important than that?” For Dogramadzi, the main technological challenge is achieving accuracy while avoiding what some see as the cumbersome form of systems like the da Vinci. “We are building a modular system that consists of a number of small interlinked robots. And while each component can be accurate down to less than a millimetre or degree, the problem is, how accurate is the whole system when it is working together?”

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However, she too believes it could be a while before autonomous systems are admitted to theatre. “Hardware would, for example, need positional sensors and safety stops to prevent accidents,” Dogramadzi says. “The software would have to be able to work on many different levels at the same time – what the scalpel was doing, what was going on with the auxiliary staff in the operating theatre – then bring it all together to make a decision. This is a big challenge. By keeping the surgeon in the operating theatre it makes our research easier, cheaper and quicker.”

But if physically constructing medical robots is difficult, the real sticking ground is the quagmire of ethics. “Who is responsible if something goes wrong? It is not always going to be one organisation. It’s going to be complicated,” says Dogramadzi.

Yet while scalpel-wielding robots might alarm patients, there is evidence that, for some procedures at least, they may be cautiously welcomed. “The initial pilot study in 2013 into patients’ perceptions of using robots in foot fracture surgery was generally positive,” Dogramadzi says. But, as she points out, surgeons were clearly in the picture. “I doubt that the response would have been so positive if the robot was fully autonomous.”

These are issues of huge import, yet to those at the bench it makes progress frustratingly slow. “Obviously you should not be able to go and do whatever you want,” Dogramadzi says, “but there are so many obstacles in the way of actually doing a project like this.”

One that has risen to the fore in the wake of the NSA revelations is that of privacy and security. Indeed, while home-help robots, such as Mobiserv, have a beguilingly innocent face, the data they hold could make them prime targets for hackers. Autonomous surgeons, robotic pills and contraceptive chips take concerns to a whole new level.

And well they might. This year a security audit published by Essentia Health, which runs about 100 hospitals, doctor’s surgeries and pharmacies in Minnesota and neighbouring states, helped to reveal to the public how badly protected much of our current healthcare technology is. Critical equipment, such as pumps that distribute antibiotics around the body and defibrillators, were, according to the report, vulnerable to hackingwith one of the issues being the poor use of passwords and rare employment of data encryption. It was even possible to change medical records or reboot machines or reboot machines. The firewalls of surgical robots in particular were easy to take down.

Despite such concerns, Dogramadzi, believes there will be a rise in robotics in many areas of medicine. “I am working now with a radiographer to see how we can use novel robotic technology to help position people during radiography,” she says. But it seems that even if questions of security and privacy can be ironed out, some procedures that will always be tackled the analogue way: “Culturally we still like to have a human there to look after you if something goes wrong, like in childbirth. We could go in that direction – but probably shouldn’t.”

Say hello to your life saver

 

 

It may seem hard to imagine that this robot, with its ridiculous balloon-shaped head and a tablet computer strapped to the front, might possibly mean the difference between life and death.

Yet if you were elderly and unwell, or recovering from a serious operation, it just might. The robot is designed to work with you to share certain information – such as your heart rate, eating habits and even whether you have taken your medication – with your family, doctor and other carers. It can summon help if it notes unusual behaviour. And in extreme situations – say if you had a heart attack or stroke – it is planned that future models could even take control of the situation.

As part of their research for the European FP7 programme, researchers at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory were, according to project leader Dr Praminda Caleb-Solly, “exploring embodiments” – an important part of how to make the domestic care robot’s interface more friendly for older adults who might not feel comfortable with technology.

“Mobiserv” was a European research project on smart technology that ran from 2009 to 2013. The aim was to develop robots, smart clothing, activity recognition systems and even smart medicine bottles to assist older people to maintain active, independent lives.

“What we found is that people want to be able to customise and personalise the robot by such means as changing the way it speaks, for instance giving it a cheeky character, making it hum while working and even giving it a smell,” says Caleb-Solly. But she says the negative portrayal of robots in popular culture is a problem –people may simply be alarmed by robo-helpers. “For example if you suddenly found the robot by the side of your bed in the night because you’d had a heart attack, demonstrating some degree of intelligence and taking control when you are not able to.” With more field-testing Caleb-Solly and her team hope to fine tune the robot to optimise their usefulness around the house in a range of situations.

The steadiest hand in the theatre

 

 

It is said that a hi-fi system is only as good as its speakers. Similarly for keyhole surgery, according to Jeremy Russell, CEO of OR Productivity which includes FreeHand 2010: “An operating theatre is only as good as the person who holds the camera for the surgeon.” The FreeHand system replaces what can be a wobbly picture with a rock-steady image controlled by a camera on a scope held in the iron grip of a robotic arm. It has been estimated this robot can help to speed up operations by 10% by improving the quality of the image a surgeon sees on their monitor. The FreeHand works by giving the surgeon direct control over where the camera goes via a hands-free controller on a headband. The direction of the camera is controlled by a movement of the head, the three-speed unit is started and stopped by touching a foot pedal, and a tap on the table enables the zoom.

Master stroke: a needle that can travel through the brain

 

 

According to Robert J Webster III, director of the Medical and Electromedical Design Lab at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, the vision that unites the innovations coming out of his laboratory is simple: “To help doctors heal people more effectively by engineering better tools for them to use in doing so.”
It is not surprising that Webster was attracted to solving the problem of blood clots in the brain - his father had one, though he was lucky and survived. Forty per cent of the people who develop one will go on to die from it. Webster’s team came up with a miniature robot made of a series of curved flexible tubes which allow it to navigate through delicate brain matter along a route mapped out by a doctor from a brain scan.

The doctor determines how much material is to be removed and the robot’s computer-controlled needle tip does the rest. Studies have suggested that it should be able to remove up to 92% of the clot. For Webster, integrating the robot with medical imaging equipment was the greatest challenge. He says it could take between four and 10 years before we see the robot used in hospitals, depending on how quickly the technology is transferred to a commercial partner.
Webster has moved on to other projects, including robots that use arms inspired by octopus tentacles and elephant trunks, enabling them to pick up and manipulate small objects more effectively.

Exoskeleton gives stroke patients a hand

 

 

It might be chalky white and fairly bulky, but could transform someone’s life after a stroke has left them with no feeling in an arm or unable to grip things tightly. That is at least the hope of Dr Thomas Burton, who designed the exoskeleton during his PhD at the Bristol robotics laboratory and built it using 3D-printing technology. This makes it easier to manufacture made-to-measure exoskeletons, which have the added advantage of enabling the mechanical joints to align with each person’s natural hand joints to improve what’s called biocompatibility. The exoskeleton is controlled by a computer which receives messages from sensors when the person tries to manipulate or grasp an object – picking up a cup of tea, for example – then activates motors to create a natural grasping motion, including an opposable thumb.

The aim is to give patients extra confidence to perform even basic tasks at home, as well as improving muscle tone. Now that the technology has been shown to make a real difference, the race is on to make it sleeker and suitable for anyone who needs support in everyday life.

The heavily-armed surgeon designed for the front line

 

 

With its four arms hanging over the patient, the da Vinci Surgical System looks more like a machine out of Alien than something that belongs in an operating theatre. Yet as of the end of June Intuitive Surgical had installed 3,102 da Vinci Surgical Systems in hospitals worldwide, and more than two million surgical procedures had been performed since the system’s approval by the US Food And Drug Administration in 2000.

According to Catherine Mohr, vice-president for medical research at Intuitive, the robot was “the brainchild of Darpa [Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency], who wanted a robot to work on soldiers injured in battle but didn’t want a surgeon exposed to the frontline”.

With this dream on hold, the focus has shifted to minimally invasive surgery for operations on patients with, for example, heart, urinary or prostate problems. This requires rearranging the conventional operating theatre to accommodate the console at which the surgeon sits to control the robot, as well as the cart with its four arms. “A surgeon with a handheld tool can be accurate to 100 micrometres, or one tenth of a millimetre,” says Mohr. “But using da Vinci even someone untrained can be accurate to 50 micrometres.” Although the da Vinci robot has been subject to a number of lawsuits, Mohr argues that surgery is never without risk and that Intuitive Surgical was found not liable the one time a case went to trial.

In the future, the da Vinci System could help the surgeon make better decisions, for example with “surgery by numbers” – where the monitor highlights target areas then helps guide the surgeon to the exact spot. But it’s unlikely to go the whole hog and end up driverless.

“I would never say never about AI,” says Mohr, “but to be able to deal with the demands of an operating theatre the AI would have to learn like us, and we are simply not there yet.”

Puzzling out bone fractures

 

 

 

Dr Sanja Dogramadzi loves a puzzle and Professor Roger Atkins, an orthopaedic surgeon at University Hospitals Bristol, gave her a difficult one to solve – the solution to which they will soon be testing on human cadavers.

According to Dogramadzi, on a daily basis surgeons face the “difficult problem of having to solve the three-dimensional challenge of putting very small pieces of broken bones back together with two-dimensional images on their monitors: get it wrong and someone may never walk again”.

First she saw it as a mathematical puzzle, then had a revelation about how her robots could come to the rescue: “All we needed to do was put robots there, then we could sort out the fracture accurately, without the need for a major incision.” The solution was two imaging systems allowing the robots to grasp pieces of bone and put them back together in the right combination. One of the imaging systems is a standard CT scan on a computer, while the other is an external positioning system much like the Kinect motion-sensing input device used on Xbox gaming computers.

This tells the surgeon where the robots and their tools are in real time. For Dogramadzi it came down to “a systems integration problem of making the hardware and software work together and achieve a degree of accuracy that is better than the surgeon – or at least the same as a surgeon”. Some very small movements can even be completed by the robots independently.

With this technique, Dogramadzi believes that she and Atkins have developed a unique way to repair fractures in an operating theatre, using minimally invasive robot surgery. She believes that the technology could help repair a wider range of fractures and even have non-medical uses, such as helping archaeologists to put broken vases back together.

Radio-controlled contraceptive

In the future women will no longer have to worry about taking the pill if MIT spin-out MicroCHIPs has its way. It is developing a competitively priced radio-controlled microchip-based implant, the size of a postage stamp, that will deliver a daily dose of contraception for up to 16 years.

The chip is implanted under the skin in a simple outpatient procedure using local anaesthesia, and can be stopped remotely if the needs of the patient change without having to go into a clinic or hospital.

Each day a small electrical charge melts an ultra-thin seal of platinum and titanium around a pinhead-sized reservoir of a hormonal contraceptive releasing a carefully controlled dose into the body.

The next challenge is to make sure the implant cannot be hacked, activated or deactivated without the woman’s knowledge. One way of doing this is to make it only possible to communicate with the implant at skin level and by making sure that all communication to and from the implant is encrypted.

MicroCHIPS has also developed a sensor to go with the chip which can adapt the dosage to the needs of the user on a day-by-day basis

While research on the implant began in the 1990s, it has really gathered pace in the last few years with backing from Bill Gates, and a simple version of the implant has been successfully tested in Denmark.

MicroCHIPS will be submitting a more advanced implant for pre-clinical testing in the US next year – and the device could possibly go on sale by 2018.

Live-stream from smart pill

The small intestine is approximately 6.25m long and about 20mm in diameter and is incredibly hard for medicine to reach. However, researchers at Imperial College, London, think they have found the answer by developing a robotic pill which will do precisely this.

The pill itself is 11mm in diameter and 30mm long, and crammed inside is a camera that can rotate through 360 degrees, a repositionable syringe with the capacity for approximately 1ml of drugs, and a retractable anchor which holds the pill in place.

Like similar robot pills that are mostly used for diagnosis, after it has been swallowed the robot pill relies on the contraction and relaxation of the muscles known as peristalsis to move through the intestines.

The intention is that video will be ­live-streamed from the camera on the pill so that, unlike most other camera pills, which are a bit hit-and-miss, when the operator sees that they have reached the target area, he or she can operate the anchor to hold the pill in place.

“At the moment commercial camera pills are passive, but with this robotic pill you will be able to target specific regions of the small intestine,” says Stephen Woods, PhD student and head of design at surgical instrumentation manufacturers Duckworth & Kent.

However, there are “significant challenges” to miniaturise the new technology, Woods says, and inevitably these have caused delays although they are now mainly overcome.

 

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc., Caelin Thomas, FOOD SERVICES NO.1 TESTING/CERTIFICATION/INSPEC/ GIREESAN
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Mandy Lo's curator insight, December 2, 2014 4:18 AM

Mathematics is everywhere, that's why mathematics education matters.

Caelin Thomas's curator insight, March 26, 2015 1:10 PM

"Would you TRUST a robot with your life?" With advances  in robotics in the medical field means that this might be a reality quite soon. With robots ability to have huge memories and being able to connect to the internet and download a continued stream of content they can have access to. The main thing holding back Robots is the require agility and intelligence to adapted to different situation. But with the huge increases with AI this may all change.

Caelin Thomas 

FOOD SERVICES NO.1 TESTING/CERTIFICATION/INSPEC/ GIREESAN's curator insight, September 25, 2015 2:55 AM

Medical robotics: 

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News: How plant sensors detect pathogens (2015)

News: How plant sensors detect pathogens (2015) | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it

In the mid-20th century, an American scientist named Harold Henry Flor helped explain how certain varieties of plants can fight off some plant killers (pathogens), but not others, with a model called the “gene-for-gene” hypothesis. Seventy years later, an international team of scientists describes precisely how a plant senses a pathogen, bringing an unprecedented level of detail to Flor’s model.

 

“We know that plants have sensors to detect pathogens but we knew little about how they work,” says Professor Banfield from the John Innes Centre (UK).

 

In a study published in eLife, the team led by Professor Mark Banfield, in collaboration with the Iwate Biotechnology Research Centre (Japan) and The Sainsbury Laboratory (UK), investigated how one sensor protein from rice called Pik binds AVR-Pik, a protein from the rice blast pathogen. This fungus causes the most devastating disease of rice crops. Using X-ray crystallography facilities at Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire, the team succeeded in imaging the contact points between the plant and pathogen proteins at the molecular level – the first time this has been done for a pair of plant and pathogen proteins that follow the gene-for-gene model.

 

Dr Abbas Maqbool from the JIC, first author of the study added, “Harold Flor predicted that plant sensors discriminate between different pathogen types, but at the time he had no knowledge of the molecules involved. It is remarkable that his ideas have now crystallized into detailed molecular models.”

 

Dr Maqbool, Professor Banfield and colleagues went on to discover that the strength at which the Pik sensor binds the pathogen AVR-Pik protein correlates with the strength of the plant’s response. This opens up new avenues for engineering better plant responses against pathogens by building sensors with increased strength of binding to pathogen proteins, and therefore conferring enhanced resistance to disease.

 

“Once we understand how these plant sensors detect invading pathogens, we can devise strategies to ‘boost’ the plant immune system and help protect rice and other important food crops from disease,” says Professor Banfield.

 

Maqbool et al. eLife http://elifesciences.org/content/4/e08709


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In a study published in eLife, the team led by Professor Mark Banfield, in collaboration with the Iwate Biotechnology Research Centre (Japan) and The Sainsbury Laboratory (UK), investigated how one sensor protein from rice called Pik binds AVR-Pik, a protein from the rice blast pathogen. This fungus causes the most devastating disease of rice crops. Using X-ray crystallography facilities at Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire, the team succeeded in imaging the contact points between the plant and pathogen proteins at the molecular level – the first time this has been done for a pair of plant and pathogen proteins that follow the gene-for-gene model.

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FOOD SERVICES NO.1 TESTING/CERTIFICATION/INSPEC/ GIREESAN's curator insight, September 22, 2015 9:19 AM

Harold Flor predicted that plant sensors discriminate between different pathogen types, but at the time he had no knowledge of the molecules involved. It is remarkable that his ideas have now crystallized into detailed molecular models.”

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Vietnamese Food Calories

Vietnamese Food Calories | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
Vietnamese food is generally light, fresh, and a healthy choice with low fat and low calorie contents. But like many foods you can easily fall into a calorie trap if you don't know how to avoid the high fat and high calorie ingredients to avoid.

Via Frank Kusters
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Vietnamese food is generally light, fresh, and a healthy choice with low fat and low calorie contents. But like many foods you can easily fall into a calorie trap if you don't know how to avoid the high fat and high calorie ingredients to avoid.
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Seafood processing plants to be reorganized

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Public Health Nutrition - How calorie-focused thinking about obesity and related diseases may mislead and harm public health. An alternative - Cambridge Journals Online

Public Health Nutrition - How calorie-focused thinking about obesity and related diseases may mislead and harm public health. An alternative - Cambridge Journals Online | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it

"public health should work primarily to support the consumption of whole foods that help protect against obesity-promoting energy imbalance and metabolic dysfunction and not continue to promote calorie-directed messages that may create and blame victims and possibly exacerbate epidemics of obesity and related diseases."


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How calorie-focused thinking about obesity and related diseases may mislead and harm public health.

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Institute for Responsible Nutrition's curator insight, August 28, 2015 8:00 PM

"public health should work primarily to support the consumption of whole foods that help protect against obesity-promoting energy imbalance and metabolic dysfunction and not continue to promote calorie-directed messages that may create and blame victims and possibly exacerbate epidemics of obesity and related diseases."

Erin Petriello's curator insight, August 28, 2015 8:19 PM

Eat real food is the not so sexy message! 

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Panorama: What's Really in our Food?

Panorama: What's Really in our Food? | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it

Panorama reveals more uncomfortable truths about the horse meat scandal.

Panorama investigates the horse meat scandal and reveals more concerns about what is really in our food. Richard Bilton questions the 'light touch' regulation of the food industry.


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HOARSE!...know your food

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Mozzarella and Cheddar are the two types of cheeses which shows prominent differences among them when it comes to its me…

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say cheese ...know the difference

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This One Common Ingredient May Be As Effective as Several Drugs

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Turmeric is arguably the most powerful herb on the planet at fighting and reversing disease. This puts Turmeric on top of the list as one of the most frequently mentioned medicinal herbs in all of science.  It has so many healing properties that currently there have been thousands of articles p... http://purehealthorigins.com/this-one-common-ingredient-may-be-as-effective-as-several-drugs/


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secret ingredient

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Tour report Chile: Industry welcomes new version 5 of the GLOBALG.A.P. Aquaculture Standard - Aquaculture Directory

Tour report Chile: Industry welcomes new version 5 of the GLOBALG.A.P. Aquaculture Standard - Aquaculture Directory | FOOD TECHNOLOGY  NEWS | Scoop.it
Key players in the Chilean aquaculture industry met on 18 August in Puerto Varas at the GLOBALG.A.P. TOUR 2015 stop organized by DNV GL, one of the world’s leading certification bodies, for a presentation of the new Version 5 of the GLOBALG.A.P. Aquaculture Standard and its impact on the aquaculture sector in the country. The new version, available since July 2015, incorporates new elements that focus on a more sustainable and socially responsible aquaculture.

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filling the G A P

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Allergen Management: Challenges and Trends - Food Safety Magazine

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Food allergies are a public health concern that must be addressed from the farm to table.
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Allergen management

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