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The Organic Center  |   The Effects of Organic Farming Practices on Nitrogen Pollution

The Organic Center  |   The Effects of Organic Farming Practices on Nitrogen Pollution | Food Security | Scoop.it
Prelim research shows that #organic crops put out less nitrogen pollution than conventional crops http://t.co/WQlDyYpyLx #GivingTuesday
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To protect bees, Portland bans insecticide

To protect bees, Portland bans insecticide | Food Security | Scoop.it
Oregon city suspends the use of any insecticide containing neonicotinoids, but not everyone is happy.
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Good News for Organic Farming -- Berkeley Study Says Productivity Higher Than Previously Thought

Good News for Organic Farming -- Berkeley Study Says Productivity Higher Than Previously Thought | Food Security | Scoop.it
A new study conducted by UC Berkeley proves that the gap between organic and industrial cultivation is not only smaller than previously thought, but most likely can be closed or exceeded with proper research and development.
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Behind the Birch trees, another world

Behind the Birch trees, another world | Food Security | Scoop.it
This Polish farm is trying to link organic farmers and city consumers.
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Urban farm acts as a tool for growth - Daily Californian

Urban farm acts as a tool for growth - Daily Californian | Food Security | Scoop.it
Urban farm acts as a tool for growth Daily Californian As students file back onto campus this week, classrooms, cafes and Memorial Glade will not be the only places ablaze with student energy — the Student Organic Gardening Association is preparing...
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Organic farming benefits lumads

Organic farming benefits lumads | Food Security | Scoop.it
A SHOWCASE of successful organic farming benefiting hundreds of mountain tribes living on ancestral lands can now be found on the cool, graceful slopes of Mt Apo, the country's highest mountain peak....
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This Land is My Land - Chronogram

This Land is My Land - Chronogram | Food Security | Scoop.it
Chronogram
This Land is My Land
Chronogram
Described by Harvard University as “one of the nation's leading sustainable agriculture and food organizations,” it does its best to present that image.
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Organic Farmers' markets : Sustainable Food in Urban Communities

Organic Farmers' markets : Sustainable Food in Urban Communities | Food Security | Scoop.it
May 28, 2013. Contributor: Athens. Workshop: Governance, synergies and local systems / Final consumers – General Public – Low-income Households & multi-ethnic communities -Youngsters Social inclusion, job creation, ...
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CSA brings farm-fresh produce to city kitchens - Toronto Star

CSA brings farm-fresh produce to city kitchens - Toronto Star | Food Security | Scoop.it
Toronto Star
CSA brings farm-fresh produce to city kitchens
Toronto Star
Every week I get to pick up my share of just-picked seasonal produce, courtesy of Kawartha CSA (which stands for Community Shared Agriculture).
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Kamut Founder Wins Rodale Institute's Organic Pioneer Award

Kamut Founder Wins Rodale Institute's Organic Pioneer Award | Food Security | Scoop.it
Quinn has made it his mission to promote sustainable and organic farming throughout the country—from helping establish the first windmill farm in Montana, to introducing the organic, heirloom grain KAMUT Brand wheat to ...
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More farmers pursue 'naturally grown' label, bucking 'organic' - Tribune-Review

More farmers pursue 'naturally grown' label, bucking 'organic' - Tribune-Review | Food Security | Scoop.it
NorthJersey.com
More farmers pursue 'naturally grown' label, bucking 'organic'
Tribune-Review
SCHAGHTICOKE, N.Y.
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Reality of modern large farming differs from romantic images - Albany Times Union

Reality of modern large farming differs from romantic images - Albany Times Union | Food Security | Scoop.it
Reality of modern large farming differs from romantic images Albany Times Union "The present system of producing food animals in the United States," Martin wrote, "is not sustainable and presents an unacceptable level of risk to public health and...
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Farmers' markets make organic produce accessible to low income residents - Our Colorado News

Farmers' markets make organic produce accessible to low income residents - Our Colorado News | Food Security | Scoop.it
Farmers' markets make organic produce accessible to low income residents Our Colorado News Sponsored by Community Enterprise, a nonprofit organization based in Commerce City dedicated to engaging and uniting community members to build sustainable,...
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If consumers knew how farmed chickens were raised, they might never eat their meat again

If consumers knew how farmed chickens were raised, they might never eat their meat again | Food Security | Scoop.it
The debate about animal welfare has intensified
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Can organic crops compete with industrial agriculture?

Can organic crops compete with industrial agriculture? | Food Security | Scoop.it
An analysis of 115 studies comparing organic and conventional farming finds that the crop yields of organic agriculture are higher than previously thought.
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Agroecology: Revolutionizing the Way We Grow Food - EcoWatch

Agroecology is a science and practice defined in the daily lives of millions worldwide. It represents both a form of agricultural production and a process
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Why America's fired up about hemp - Salon

Why America's fired up about hemp - Salon | Food Security | Scoop.it
Salon
Why America's fired up about hemp
Salon
And farms are selling back to the grid, or in some places like Bellheim, Germany, they're creating their own community-based grid and putting unemployed people to work running it.
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Farmers’ conversion to organic farming triples yields and earnings

Farmers’ conversion to organic farming triples yields and earnings | Food Security | Scoop.it
Latest Kenyan farmer & farming news featuring Agriscience news, Agronomic, and Market trends.
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GRAIN — Climate Summit: Don't turn farmers into 'climate smart' carbon traders!

GRAIN — Climate Summit: Don't turn farmers into 'climate smart' carbon traders! | Food Security | Scoop.it

Climate Summit: don't turn farmers into 'climate smart' carbon traders!

Farmers produce food, not carbon. Yet, if some of the governments and corporate lobbies negotiating at the UN climate change conference to be held in Warsaw from 11-22 November have their way, farmland could soon be considered as a carbon sink that polluting corporations can buy into to compensate for their harmful emissions.

“We are directly opposed to the carbon market approach to dealing with the climate crisis,” says Josie Riffaud of La Vía Campesina. “Turning our farmers' fields into carbon sinks – the rights to which can be sold on the carbon market – will only lead us further away from what we see as the real solution: food sovereignty. The carbon in our farms is not for sale!”

Carbon trading has totally failed to address the real causes of the climate crisis. It was never meant to do so. Rather than reducing carbon emissions at their source, it has created a lucrative market for polluters and speculators to buy and sell carbon credits while continuing to pollute. Now the pressure is increasing to treat farmland as a major carbon sink which can be claimed as yet another counterbalance to industrial emissions. The governments of the US and Australia, the World Bank and the corporate sector have long argued for this, and for the creation of new carbon markets where they can purchase land-based offsets in developing countries. Agribusiness is well positioned to profit from these, and some developing country governments hope that offering their forests, grasslands and farmland to polluters in the North could earn them revenue.

The November United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) conference in Warsaw risks pushing us deeper into this carbon market mess. Marcin Korolec, Poland's minister of the environment and main organiser of the event, proudly announced that for the first time ever, representatives of global business will be formally part of the negotiations. A look at the list of official partners of the conference shows that they are amongst the most polluting industries of the world.

Agriculture is a major contributor to climate change, but Henk Hobbelink of GRAIN points out that: "It is the industrial food system – with its heavy use of chemical inputs, the soil erosion and deforestation that accompanies monoculture plantation farming, and the ever-growing drive to supply far away export markets – which is the main culprit behind the climate crisis. Rather than promoting this with carbon markets, the world's leaders should support peasant farming and agroecology as the solution.” GRAIN's research has shown that a sustained focus on peasant-based agroecological practices oriented toward restoring organic matter to soils could capture 24-30% of the current global annual greenhouse gas emissions.

A week after the climate negotiators have flown home from Warsaw, most likely without having agreed to any meaningful action on the climate crisis, the World Bank and the governments of the Netherlands and South Africa will convene an international conference in Johannesburg to promote ”climate smart agriculture”, and set up a new alliance to achieve it.

But a look at the proposals on the table shows that it entails nothing more than business as usual: new genetically modified seeds developed by biotechnology corporations, more chemical fertilisers and pesticides by the agrochemical giants, and more 'bio-intensive' industrial plantation farming. “Climate smart agriculture has become the new slogan for the agricultural research establishment and the corporate sector to position themselves as the solution to the food and climate crisis,” says Pat Mooney of the ETC Group. “For the world's small farmers, there is nothing smart about this. It is just another way to push corporate controlled technologies into their fields and rob them of their land.”

At the same time, these very corporations are developing other high-risk technologies, ranging from synthetic biology, to nanotechnology and geoengineering. There is no clear understanding of their impacts and these new dramatic technologies will wreak more havoc on our already fragile planet than cure the climate and environmental crises.

Agriculture's central role of feeding people and providing livelihoods to smallholders around the world should be defended, says Elizabeth Mpofu, from Vía Campesina. “Rights over our farms, lands, seeds and natural resources need to remain in our hands so we can produce food and care for our mother earth as peasant farmers have done for centuries. We will not allow carbon markets to turn our hard work into carbon sinks that allow polluters to continue their business as usual.”

 


Via Giri Kumar
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Food Movements Unite! - Slow food

Food Movements Unite! - Slow food | Food Security | Scoop.it
Food Movements Unite! Slow food In West Oakland, California, 50,000 low-income residents spend over half a million dollars a year on food —dollars that if recycled through locally owned retail could contribute significantly to community economic...
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Community Supported Agriculture: Cultivating better food and closer ...

Community Supported Agriculture: Cultivating better food and closer ... | Food Security | Scoop.it
Fresh, organic, local food from a known source • Enhanced flavor and nutritional benefits that are only possible on small, organic farms. Due to the sustainable farming techniques used by most CSA farms (crop rotation, cover ...
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Why organic farming is empowering business - New Era

Why organic farming is empowering business - New Era | Food Security | Scoop.it
Why organic farming is empowering business New Era OKAHANDJA – Ten good reasons exist why sustainable and organic farming should be promoted in Africa, Dr Irene Kadzere, senior scientist of the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture, (FiBL) in...
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Naturally Grown: An alternative label to organic - TwinCities.com

Naturally Grown: An alternative label to organic - TwinCities.com | Food Security | Scoop.it
Because the Denisons chose not to seek organic certification by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Denison Farm, which has been under organic management for more than 20 years, is banned from using that term.
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Small farmers promote 'Naturally Grown' as alternative label to organic - UpNorthLive.com

Small farmers promote 'Naturally Grown' as alternative label to organic - UpNorthLive.com | Food Security | Scoop.it
San Francisco Chronicle Small farmers promote 'Naturally Grown' as alternative label to organic UpNorthLive.com Proponents say the program lets them promote their commitment to sustainable agriculture without the cost and extensive paperwork of the...
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Otago study shows legacy of pesticides difficult to avoid - HealthCanal.com

Otago study shows legacy of pesticides difficult to avoid - HealthCanal.com | Food Security | Scoop.it
Otago study shows legacy of pesticides difficult to avoid HealthCanal.com In each of the five areas, one property was farmed organically, a second was farmed using the integrated pest management (reduced pesticide use) farming method, and a third...
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