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Commercial and Residential Grills | NorCal Ovenworks Inc.

Commercial and Residential Grills | NorCal Ovenworks Inc. | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it


"We design and build: Argentine Grills, Asado Catering Equipment, Built-In Grills, Built-In Grills for Complete Modular Kitchens, Portable Outdoor Wood Fired Pizza Ovens, Santa Maria Grills, Smokers/Smoker-Grills, Tuscan Grills, and Uruguayan Grills" 

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Rescooped by The Planetary Archives from Ancient Plants For The Future: Amaranth, Bamboo, Hemp, and More
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WarkaWater Tower Collects Drinking Water From Air - YouTube

The WarkaWater Tower, which is easy and cheap to construct, uses no electricity and has the ability to produce up to 25 gallons of water in a day by capturin...

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Amazonian tribes unite against Brazil’s controversial plans for hydroelectric dams

Amazonian tribes unite against Brazil’s controversial plans for hydroelectric dams | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Amazonian tribes are uniting against the Brazilian government’s plans to build hydroelectric dams right on their doorstep. As the projects accelerate, people have not been consulted, nor have proper environmental studies been carried out.
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North America’s Oil And Gas Industry Has Taken Over 7 Million Acres Of Land Since 2000

North America’s Oil And Gas Industry Has Taken Over 7 Million Acres Of Land Since 2000 | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
The chunks of land turned over to oil and gas development, if combined, would equal three Yellowstone National Parks.

Via SustainOurEarth, Demarcio Washington
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The Planetary Archives 's curator insight, April 30, 12:13 PM

More news not in "the news."

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Endangered corals smothered by sponges on overfished Caribbean reefs

Endangered corals smothered by sponges on overfished Caribbean reefs | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
For reef-building corals, sponges do not make good neighbors. Aggressive competitors for space, sponges use toxins, mucus, shading, and smothering to kill adjacent coral colonies and then grow on their skeletons. A recent survey of coral reefs across the Caribbean shows that overfishing removes the ...
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Now that You Can Pronounce Quinoa, Try These Other Whole Grains

Now that You Can Pronounce Quinoa, Try These Other Whole Grains | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Amaranth is a South American grain that is both wheat-free and gluten-free. It is high in protein and contains more amino acids like lysine, methionine and cysteine than other grains. Amaranth also contains lots of vitamin C, calcium and iron. Amaranth is a tiny poppy seed-sized grain that has a grassy, nutty flavor. It becomes sticky when cooked. It is a good substitute for rice and tastes great mixed with veggies. Eat amaranth as a cereal or add it to soups and stews. You can even pop it! Just toast the seeds in a hot, dry skillet, shaking it until they pop. To cook: use 1 cup amaranth to 3 cups water; simmer 25-30 minutes. Try it in this Yogurt Mandarin Cake with Amaranth Crust and these Red Lentil and Amaranth Protein Patties with Spicy Avocado.
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Subsidies to industries that cause deforestation worth 100 times more than aid to prevent it

Subsidies to industries that cause deforestation worth 100 times more than aid to prevent it | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Brazil and Indonesia paid over $40bn in subsidies to industries that drive rainforest destruction between 2009 and 2012 - compared to $346m in conservation aid they received to protect forests, according to new research

Via Wildforests
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How trees protect your home by slowing wind speed, soil erosion, and water runoff | Big Blog Of Gardening ~ organic gardening and organic lawn care

How trees protect your home by slowing wind speed, soil erosion, and water runoff | Big Blog Of Gardening ~ organic gardening and organic lawn care | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Besides aesthetics and shade, trees also stabilize soil and reduce erosion, store water, provide wildlife habitat, and moderate air and soil temperatures...

 

 

After Hurricane Sandy felled thousands of trees in October and took down power lines throughout the mid Atlantic, I started thinking about how the sudden loss of those beautiful old growth trees would change the properties they stood on.

Besides the obvious functions of aesthetics and shade, trees also stabilize soil and reduce erosion, increase soil fertility, enhance the land’s ability to store water, provide wildlife habitat, moderate air and soil temperatures, and help to reduce salinization. Trees are therefore essential in protecting our homes and communities. This may seem counterintuitive in the wake of so many large trees being snapped like twigs during Hurricane Sandy, but bare with me.

 

“We can thank trees for our life. They evolved an imponderable 370 million years ago and helped create the very air that we breathe by “inhaling” carbon dioxide, acting as carbon sinks, and “exhaling” oxygen…With the exception of a very few reptiles, trees are the only living organisms with a lifespan greater than that of humans. They are unique inter-generational gifts to pass on to our descendants. Indeed, the oldest living tree has spanned more than 150 human generations.” - United Nations Plant For The Planet The Billion Tree Campaign.

 

Trees protect your home by slowing wind speed.

 

Windbreaksare one of the most essential functions of trees and are key in minimizing damage to our homes from storms.The function of windbreaks is to slow wind speed. Trees, even one or two, are very effective as windbreaks, but your choice of species and planting location must be considered carefully. A mix of deciduous trees (those that lose their foliage in winter) and evergreens offer the best protection. If only large evergreens are used, they may allow so little wind to pass through that they take on the qualities of a fence – hurricane strength winds have difficulty passing through, and the force uproots the tree. In my neighborhood, Hurricane Sandy took down the biggest trees, and almost all were pines.

Trees should be planted on the leeward side of your home, which is the side which receives the prevailing winds. This will vary depending upon where you live. At my home in northeast Pennsylvania, most of our storms blow from the South or West, as they usually travel up along the coast of the mid Atlantic or roar in from the midwest.

When choosing trees to serve as windbreaks, look for species that mature at a few feet over the peak of your house – the mature height of every tree is shown on the plant tag at your local garden center. Plan your windbreak so the trees are a sufficient distance from buildings to allow the trees to grow without restriction. I can’t tell you how often I see a beautiful tree like a white pine (popular as Christmas trees) planted only ten feet from someone’s front door. It looks beautiful when the tree is a sapling, but becomes a huge problem in twenty years as it begins to reach maturity, shading out everything around it, blocking the view, and branches and roots butt up against walls and foundation.

On small properties, Arborvitae may be a better choice for wind protection. Some members of this family of shrubs can grow as tall as trees, from 8-60 feet, but don’t have as wide a profile. Arborvitae provide excellent wind protection, as their foliage runs all the way to ground level, but allows wind to pass through, and they don’t have large limbs which break off and create hazards in storms. Arborvitae also make excellent natural fences.

Always choose species of trees or Arborvitae that are native to your area, as they’re adapted to your local climate and will thrive with little maintenance.

 

One large tree can lift up to 100 gallons of water out of the ground and discharge it into the air in a day – North Carolina State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

 

Trees offer protection against soil erosion and intercept storm water runoff.

 

Much of the rain that hits a tree collects in the leaf canopy and bark, where it evaporates back into the air, leaving the rest to drip to the soil below. Tree roots extending 2-3 times beyond the dripline (the area beyond which no water will drip from foliage) absorb much of this water. In fact, the crown of a large tree can intercept so much rainfall that in one year more than 1500 gallons will evaporate back into the atmosphere instead of hitting the ground.

If that tree is removed either intentionally or by a storm, the rainwater is free to run across your property, taking with it topsoil and other beneficial organic matter, eventually dumping it all into your local storm sewer. A properly maintained lawn provides protection from erosion, but little when compared to a tree.

Depending on size and species, a single tree may store 100 gallons or more of water until it reaches its saturation point after one to two inches of rainfall. When multiplied by the number of trees in a community, this interception and redistribution of rainwater can be significant. The slowed water percolates through the soil, finding its way into local aquifers and feeding streams and rivers. Trees also protect your soil from wind erosion – the drying of the soil caused by wind.

 

“Trees properly placed around buildings can reduce air conditioning needs by 30% and save 20-50 percent in energy used for heating.” – USDA Forest Service

 

 

Trees moderate surrounding air and soil temperature.

 

 

What’s better than cooling off on a hot summer day under the dense shade of a beautiful, old Maple tree?That cooling effect also extends to the soil around the tree, keeping insects, worms and bio-organisms happy near the surface, instead of driving them deep below to stay cool. These creatures are brilliant at breaking down organic matter like fallen tree leaves into elements necessary for plant growth, benefiting the lawn and flowers within the shade of the tree.

For the most effective temperature moderation of your home, plant deciduous trees on the south side of your property. The mature tree will cast a cooling shadow on your house on summer afternoons and the absence of foliage in winter allows the sun to warm the house. Once again, be aware of the mature size of the tree when determining planting distance from walls.

Trees clean air and provide oxygen

Trees act as a giant carbon dioxide (CO2) sponge. They require CO2 to perform photosynthesis, and then give us the byproduct of this process, oxygen. This improves the air quality around your home and in your community and is especially important in cities. “A big tree does 60 to 70 times the pollution removal of a small tree,” says David Nowak, a project leader with the U.S. Forest Service’s Northern Research Station in Syracuse, N.Y. It’s estimated that one mature tree, depending on its type, can annually release enough oxygen for a family of four.

Additional benefits of planting trees

Trees planted along your property line can provide privacy and look a whole lot friendlier than a fenceThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency states that trees can reduce bothersome noise by up to 50% and mask unwanted noises with pleasant, natural soundsTrees nurture birds, beneficial insects and other wildlife, providing resting spots during migration, nesting opportunties, and protection from weather extremesTrees increase the value of your home, as a well landscaped property is more attractive to buyers than a clear cut property

These suggestions for planting trees will offer protection from typical storms. However, with hurricane force winds like those from Sandy, anything can happen, and the best planning may be rendered moot. In my area, Hurricane Sandy’s winds came from the North, an odd direction for us in the fall, but this was no normal storm. The largest trees took the brunt of the 75 mph winds, which is why the power outages were so extreme.

With climate change upon us, it’s predicted that storms such as Sandy will become more frequent. The more natural protection you can provide for your home, the safer you’ll be.

 


Via Giri Kumar, Grace Nakate
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Robert S. Gonzalez's comment, September 3, 2013 1:54 AM
Tress can protect house and people, but if we don't care for it ,it ruins life.
Noor Fatima's comment, October 13, 2013 5:48 AM
yes (y)
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By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World

By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Cities might be burning three times more energy in 2050 than they did in 2005—unless they act now.

Via Flora Moon, Société Française de Prospective
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Palestinians demonstrate resistance, brick by brick

Palestinians demonstrate resistance, brick by brick | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Palestinians in the Jordan Valley are reviving the ancient art of earth building, learning resistance from the Earth during a time of conflict

Via planwithdan
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Honduran indigenous leader wins prestigious environmental prize - The Tico Times

The Tico Times Honduran indigenous leader wins prestigious environmental prize The Tico Times Cáceres, COPINH (the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras) and the people of Río Blanco have maintained a two-year struggle to halt...

Via A/Prof Jon Willis
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10 Creative Ways to Incorporate Bamboo into Your Eco-Friendly Life

10 Creative Ways to Incorporate Bamboo into Your Eco-Friendly Life | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
In short, bamboo is coming to be viewed by many as a possible planet-saving miracle plant.
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How one woman unplugged from technology for her family — and how you can ... - Deseret News

How one woman unplugged from technology for her family — and how you can ... - Deseret News | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Science tells us that screen time puts our minds, bodies and relationships at risk.

Via Paulo Gervasio
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The Quinoa Economy

The Quinoa Economy | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
This superfood might be great for your health, but how is its soaring popularity affecting the people responsible for farming it?
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The biggest source of plastic trash you’ve never heard of

The biggest source of plastic trash you’ve never heard of | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
From acres of sheeting to miles of twine, farms use billions of pounds of plastic each year. What can we do to reduce the impact?

Via Anita Woodruff
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Vatican official calls for moral awakening on global warming

Vatican official calls for moral awakening on global warming | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it

“In our recklessness, we are traversing some of the planet’s most fundamental natural boundaries,” warned Turkson. “And the lesson from the Garden of Eden still rings true today: pride, hubris, self-centredness are always perilous, indeed destructive. The very technology that has brought great reward is now poised to bring great ruin.”

 

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Five Science Videos That Make You Think About Ethics, Habitat and Climate Change

Five Science Videos That Make You Think About Ethics, Habitat and Climate Change | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Awesome science videos to spark students' interests in everything from wildlife protection to ocean acidification.

Via Cindy Rudy, Wai Ling Liu
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This Natural Pool Cleans Itself With Plants, Not Chlorine

This Natural Pool Cleans Itself With Plants, Not Chlorine | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it

"Most swimming pools are doused in chlorine as a disinfectant, despite the fact that the chemical can react with other things commonly found in pools—like pee and skin cells—to create byproducts linked to asthma and cancer. A new temporary pool in London takes a different approach by cleaning the water with plants instead.

"In a "regeneration zone," plants like pondweed and water lily absorb nitrates and ammonium and release oxygen, while microorganisms reduce algae and germs. Another section of the pool uses a gravel bed to host another layer of microorganisms for more cleaning. Throughout the day, pumps push the water from the swimming area through the filters."

 

click through for more

 

 

 


Via Susan Davis Cushing, Tania Gammage
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Oceans are world's seventh largest economy worth $24tn, says WWF report

Oceans are world's seventh largest economy worth $24tn, says WWF report | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Vast economic worth of world’s oceans includes fishing, tourism and shipping but is declining due to pollution, climate change and overfishing The monetary value of the world’s oceans has been estimated at US$24tn in a new report that warns that...

Via Mariaschnee
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NABARD Promoting Solar Pumps in India

NABARD Promoting Solar Pumps in India | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it

India is leading the way in solar power pumping technology. After the call of India’s Prime Minister Mr. Narendra Modi for improvement and research to make solar and wind power affordable, the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) has all set to apply solar photovoltaic water pumping system plan to reach pan India. The scheme aims to inspire all the solar PV manufacturers to boost their participation to support farmers to use solar systems for irrigation and other farm requirements.


Via sonia sharma, Grace Nakate
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sonia sharma's curator insight, February 20, 5:25 AM

best solar pumps online, buy solar pumps india, NABARD Promoting Solar India, NABARD Promoting Solar Pumps in India, PV pump systems, solar power systems, solar pump news, solar pumps dealers, solar pumps online, solar pumps prices, Solar PV pump systems

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Manure and mysticism: Biodynamic farming turns 90 | Environment | DW.DE | 17.04.2015

Manure and mysticism: Biodynamic farming turns 90 | Environment | DW.DE | 17.04.2015 | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Since spiritually oriented biodynamic agriculture began in Germany 90 years ago, its popularity - and controversy - have spread across the globe. The method is definitely eco-friendly. But can it help feed the planet?
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Christian Allié's curator insight, May 1, 5:46 AM

.............."""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""".............

 

[ ... ]

......... 

'Cosmic forces'


Anthroposophists place the power of their method in what they describe as "cosmic forces" - which their preparations are supposed to activate.

These preparations contain herbs such as yarrow, chamomile or dandelions - or substances like manure - which are applied to the fields in tiny doses. Biodynamic farmers believe the cow poop preparation that Rodewyk distributes over his field stimulates root growth by "harmonizing life processes."

"It's not about the physical dimension," says Herrnweg, who adds that the number of micrograms of yarrow in the preparations doesn't matter so much. He compares biodynamic agriculture to homeopathy: There's nothing there, yet it works anyway.

And, like homeopathy, biodynamic agriculture has its share of skeptics.

 

Increased soil fertility


So is biodynamic agriculture nothing more than hocus-pocus - or is there something to it?

The Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL) in Switzerland has been testing exactly that through a study that's been running since 1978. On three adjacent fields, the institute is comparing conventional agriculture with organic farming and biodynamic methods.

Urs Niggli, head of the FiBL, describes some results: "In the first 15 years nothing - but then after the 15th year, differences gradually became apparent." According to Niggli, results showed that the soil on the biodynamic field became far more fertile than on the conventional field.

That research indicates that biodynamic methods indeed improve the soil quality. But is this connected directly to application of the preparations? From a scientific perspective, the amounts of active substances are simply far too small.

[ ... ]

 

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How the Bay Area's last slaughterhouse dodged the axe

How the Bay Area's last slaughterhouse dodged the axe | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
You want local meat? You're gonna need a local slaughterhouse. It took a tanking economy and a massive beef recall to save the last such outfit in the Bay Area.
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The Cherán Indigenous Community's Remarkable Road to Self-Rule in Mexico

The Cherán Indigenous Community's Remarkable Road to Self-Rule in Mexico | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
“For Justice, Security and the Restoration of our Territory”—that's the slogan emblazoned on the uniform of the people in charge of security in Cherán, one

Via A/Prof Jon Willis
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Conservación de Semillas

Conservación de Semillas | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Por Doug Hall
Guardar y almacenar semillas de sus hortalizas y hierbas aromáticas es una forma de ahorrar y siempre tener disponibles las semillas que preferimos.
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The Plan to Bring Nature Back to the Los Angeles River | WIRED

The Plan to Bring Nature Back to the Los Angeles River | WIRED | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Los Angeles' river, a long-neglected wasteland, is about to become an urban oasis: a linear, riparian Central Park.
The Planetary Archives 's insight:

Using water from Northern California, of course.....

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What happened to America’s black farmers?

What happened to America’s black farmers? | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
John Boyd remembers watching a USDA official toss his loan application in the trash. It was the late ’80s, and Boyd, a fourth-generation black farmer from Baskerville, Va., was counting on a $5,000 loan to keep his family farm in business.
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The Great Tomato Sale

The Great Tomato Sale | Permaculture, Environment, & Homesteading | Scoop.it
Photo Essay • David Meza
Did you know that Russia has its own special tomato? How about Japan? Kentucky?
If you attended the Great Tomato Plant Sale, “Heirlooms Of The World,” at the AdamsCrest Urban Farm in East Richmond Heights Apr.
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