Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements
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Cabin Fever: Are Tiny Houses The New American Dream?

Cabin Fever: Are Tiny Houses The New American Dream? | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Tiny houses have seemingly taken over the landscape of aspirational real estate, and not just for the green-minded. What's the appeal?
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WarkaWater | Each Drop Counts

WarkaWater | Each Drop Counts | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it

The Warka’s water harvesting technique and construction system are inspired by several sources. Many plants and animals have developed unique micro- and nano-scale structural features on their surfaces that enable them to collect water from the air and survive in hostile environments. By studying the Namib beetle’s shell, lotus flower leaves, spider web threads and the integrated fog collection system in cactus, we are identifying specific materials and coatings that can enhance dew condensation and water flow and storage capabilities of the mesh. The termite hives have influenced the design of Warka’s outer shell, its airflow, shape and geometry. We also looked at local cultures and vernacular architecture, incorporating traditional Ethiopian basket-weaving techniques in Warka’s design.


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Eric Larson's curator insight, February 6, 2016 9:13 PM

Fascinating design???

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Modern agriculture cultivates climate change – we must nurture biodiversity

Modern agriculture cultivates climate change – we must nurture biodiversity | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
The reason the productivity of industrial agriculture is now under threat is because it has been systematically degrading the human and natural capital on which it relies. Pests, viruses, fungi, bacteria and weeds are adapting to chemical pest management faster than ever: 210 species of herbicide-resistant weeds have been identified. Meanwhile, synthetic fertilisers are fast destroying the soil biota and its nutrient-recycling potential. This creates a dangerous treadmill effect: increasing resistance leads to increasing pesticide use, generating mounting costs for farmers and further environmental degradation. This in turn requires additional doses of nutrient application to keep squeezing productivity out of the soils.

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urban super forest by super future group imagines invisible city

urban super forest by super future group imagines invisible city | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
the proposal, which re-imagines the city of vienna, combines natural habitat and vertical expansion to create a city virtually invisible from above.

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Sales of Antibiotics for Livestock Surges Despite Industry Pledges to Cut Back

Sales of Antibiotics for Livestock Surges Despite Industry Pledges to Cut Back | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Scientists and regulators have sounded the alarm linking the overuse of antibiotics in livestock production with helping to increase the creation and spread of antibiotic resistant infections. Three years ago, as a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) launched a voluntary program seeking to curb some livestock drug uses. But the widespread use of these antibiotics seems to continue as before.

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Eric Larson's curator insight, December 29, 2016 9:05 AM
Antibiotic surge?
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Paysan en agroforesterie - Participez à la transition énergétique pour la croissance verte

Paysan en agroforesterie - Participez à la transition énergétique pour la croissance verte | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Paysan en agroforesterie https://t.co/4tuOBz98Hg
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International Rights of Nature Tribunal: Pachamama vs ‘Macho Papas’

The US state of Texas is home to some of the world’s largest petrochemical, shipping and freight industries. Unsurprisingly, Texas is also the worst culprit when it comes to carbon emissions (it is, in fact, worse than most nation states). Texas has been directly impacted by climate change through severe storms, flooding and hurricanes, as well as droughts and subsequent wildfires. Yet the Governor of Texas, Rick Perry, denies this is linked to man-made global warming.

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Rise of the mutant (and tasteless) tomato

Rise of the mutant (and tasteless) tomato | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Growing up in Alabama in the 1950s, Stuart Collins ate tomatoes his father grew. He can still remember the taste — powerful, sweet, and nothing like supermarket tomatoes today.

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Bay Area Food System Leaders Honor Pioneering Farm Model at the Sunol AgPark

Sunol, CA – Today, leaders from the Bay Area food and farming community joined representatives of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Sunol AgPark. The AgPark was started in 2006 by Sibella Kraus, President of SAGE (Sustainable Agriculture Education), and has been managed since then as a collaborative farm where, independent farmers can farm land while providing access and educational opportunities for the community.
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New Haven Farms, Gardens Are New Prescription for Health for Many City Residents

New Haven Farms, Gardens Are New Prescription for Health for Many City Residents | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it

Conception Guerrero not only lost weight and no longer depends on medication, but she has found she can also be a leader in the community.


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Ron Wolford's curator insight, October 15, 2015 8:43 AM

New Haven Register

Eric Larson's curator insight, November 3, 2016 8:58 AM
Cool ideas.
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The Future of Our Food Depends on Small Farmers and Well Cared-For Livestock

The Future of Our Food Depends on Small Farmers and Well Cared-For Livestock | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Abusive farming of animals in factory farms is one of the great cruelties of the modern age, writes Philip Lymbery. While some may justify it as necessary to 'feed the world', it is no such thing. The answer lies in supporting small scale traditional farmers, and respecting the livestock that are intrinsic to sustainable agriculture across the planet.

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Helpful Garden Insects for Organic Gardening

Helpful Garden Insects for Organic Gardening | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Which are the Garden Insects? Many times if the word insects are some bug that may damage plants or merely are pests.

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Applied Sciences: The Zoetrope

Applied Sciences: The Zoetrope | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it

The Zoetrope - A Low-Cost, Open Source Wind Turbine... et c'est libre.


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Meet John D. Liu, the Indiana Jones of Landscape Restoration - Regeneration International

Meet John D. Liu, the Indiana Jones of Landscape Restoration - Regeneration International | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
John D. Liu, ecosystem restoration researcher, educator and filmmaker, has dedicated his life to sharing real-world examples of once-degraded landscapes newly restored to their original fertile and biodiverse beauty. Liu is director of the Environmental Education Media Project (EEMP), ecosystem ambassador for the Commonland Foundation and a visiting research fellow at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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Ecoagriculture landscapes - Adapting, designing and managing biodiversity & ecosystem services for sustainability

Ecoagriculture landscapes - Adapting, designing and managing biodiversity & ecosystem services for sustainability | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Ecoagriculture landscapes - Adapting, designing and managing biodiversity & ecosystem services for sustainability
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7-Eleven Announces First Sustainably-Sourced Coffee

7-Eleven Announces First Sustainably-Sourced Coffee | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Last week, 7-Eleven announced that it would start offering a Rainforest Alliance-certified coffee, sourced from Nicaragua, at participating stores.
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The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California's insight:
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TERA | Habitons le présent : "Un écovillage pour le XXIème Siècle

TERA | Habitons le présent : "Un écovillage pour le XXIème Siècle | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it

Tera est un projet expérimental qui vise à construire un éco-village pour relocaliser à 85% la production vitale à ses habitants, abaisser son empreinte écologique à moins d'une planète, valoriser cette production en monnaie citoyenne locale, émise via un revenu d'autonomie d'un euro supérieur au seuil de pauvreté pour chacun de ses habitants...


°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°

Newsletter Tera : http://bit.ly/2hYze8S



Via Serge Meunier, Sophie Herolt Petitpas
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Eric Larson's curator insight, January 10, 9:07 AM
Green village?
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This New Neighborhood Will Grow Its Own Food, Power Itself, And Handle Its Own Waste

This New Neighborhood Will Grow Its Own Food, Power Itself, And Handle Its Own Waste | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
ADELE PETERS 05.25.16 6:00 AM
If you live inside one of the houses in a new neighborhood being built in an Amsterdam suburb, your dining room might be next to an indoor vegetable garden. Outside, you'll have another seasonal garden. And down the street, almost everything you eat will be grown in high-tech vertical farms.

The neighborhood will be the first ReGen Village, a new type of community designed to be fully self-sufficient, growing its own food, making its own energy, and handling its own waste in a closed loop.

Via Mário Carmo, pdeppisch
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Eben Lenderking's curator insight, December 28, 2016 5:40 AM

Fascinating

Eric Larson's curator insight, December 28, 2016 9:54 AM
Truly sustainable?
Juan Antonio Castán's curator insight, January 3, 3:17 AM
Este nuevo barrio cultivará su propia comida, generará su energía y gestionará sus residups
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How to grow agroforests in DPR Korea | Agroforestry World Blog

How to grow agroforests in DPR Korea | Agroforestry World Blog | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Scientists from the East Asia Node of the World Agroforestry Centre have been working in DPR Korea helping local people to improve their food security. To ensure the success of the program, the team have published a guide ...

Via Philippe Durand, Ghislaine NOUALLET
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The Case For Heritage Turkeys - Modern Farmer

The Case For Heritage Turkeys - Modern Farmer | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Almost every turkey sold in the United States was bred to develop a grotesquely large chest. But there's a more human way to raise a holiday bird. Here's how.

If Benjamin Franklin had gotten his way, the turkey might have become America’s national symbol. In a 1784 letter to his daughter, the founding father described the bald eagle as a “rank coward” of “bad moral character.” The turkey, Franklin wrote, “though a little vain and silly, [is] a bird of courage,” one that seemed more representative of the newly formed United States: “Eagles have been found in all countries, but the turkey was peculiar to ours.
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Windows Northampton

Windows Northampton | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it

A window Northampton hinged at the side with a metal bar – used to hold the window in place when opened. These are a common window type for homes in the Northampton, though they are slowly being replaced


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Farming Without Water? Age-Old Techniques Are Making a Comeback

Farming Without Water? Age-Old Techniques Are Making a Comeback | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
While dry farming has geographic limitations, it could pave the way for more coastal agriculture and offer techniques for farmers in dryer areas to farm with less water.

 

“In the beginning, I searched out people who were known dry-farmers,” says Little, who started in farming in 1995. “It seemed like no one had done it for 30 years or so, and then it wasn’t done much.”

To find mentors, Little made the rounds at local bars, asking older farmers about their experiences. “They were very humble,” he says. “They told stories about how things were done, and I would pick up tidbits.” After years of trial and error, he now considers himself an expert.

To help people understand how dry farming works, Little often evokes the image of a wet sponge covered with cellophane. Following winter and spring rains, soil is cultivated to break it up and create a moist “sponge,” then the top layer is compacted using a roller to form a dry crust (the “cellophane”). This three- to four-inch layer, sometimes referred to as a dust mulch, seals in water and prevents evaporation.

“It’s very challenging because you have to hold the moisture for long periods of time, and you don’t know how different crops are going to react in different areas,” Little says. Much of the land he farms is rolling hills and valleys, which present additional challenges because they hold and move groundwater differently than flat land.

Deprived of any surface irrigation besides the coastal fog, dry-farmed plants develop deep, robust roots to seek out and soak up soil moisture. Because they absorb less water than their conventionally irrigated counterparts, dry-farmed crops are characteristically smaller but more nutrient-dense and flavorful.

“When you water a tree, it dilutes the flavor a lot in some cases,” says Stan Devoto, who dry-farms more than 50 varieties of heirloom apples at Devoto Gardens. “Instead of having a really hard, crisp, firm texture, your apple will be two or three times the size of a dry-farmed apple, and you just don’t get the flavor.”

Devoto has been dry-farming in Sebastopol since the 1970s. “We had no choice,” he says. “There’s just not enough water in West [Sonoma] County to water orchards. Pretty much all the orchards are dry-farmed, with the exception of the orchards where trees are planted super close or use dwarf rootstock.”

Having wide orchard rows, which allow tree roots to spread out, is essential for dry-farming apples, as is thinning (removing much of the fruit early in its development) to ensure that each apple gets as much water as possible. In dryer years (like this one), Devoto must work extra hard to control weeds, which drink water needed by thirsty trees. As the summer progresses, the ground slowly dries out, stressing out the fruits as they ripen, which helps the sugars become more concentrated.

But while water conservation and intensely flavorful crops are the clear benefits of dry farming, the major tradeoff is yield. Devoto says that apple growers in West Sonoma County, which was once home to a booming apple industry, only get about 12 tons per acre, compared to 30 to 40 tons produced by large apple farms in the Central Valley.

Similarly, Joe Schirmer of Dirty Girl Produce says that his famous dry-farmed Early Girl tomatoes sometimes yield only about a third of what their irrigated counterparts produce. Meanwhile, Little estimates that he gets about a quarter to a third the yield of large organic potato growers. “It it’s hard to compete with some of these big organic farms that are watering,” he says.

Without irrigation, his crops are at the mercy of seasonal rainfall and varying soil conditions from year to year. “You’re on the edge constantly, and one little thing could tip you over,” Little reflects. “We’re barely making it, really, but I believe in coastal farming. I believe we’re going to come back to it.”

While dry farming has geographic limitations, it could pave the way for more coastal agriculture and offer techniques for farmers in dryer areas to farm with less water. “The coast of California used to be our main source of food in the state, until they started developing farms in the Central Valley because of all the water,” Little continues. “Now they’re running out of water.”

Devoto’s Gravenstein apples, an early-season heirloom variety that represents Sonoma County’s agricultural heritage, return to the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market this week. “Apples grown in the West County may not be picture-perfect or super large,” Devoto notes. “But the flavor is just phenomenal.”


Via Giri Kumar, Michelle Pollace
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Christopher Michael Homokay's curator insight, October 12, 2016 10:09 PM
Dry farming in coastal zones. An age old farming practice involving compacted soil and specific varieties of crop. From first hand experience, my family orchard was not watered for 2 years from 2010-2012, while I was living and traveling abroad. Our apples trees in Simi Valley are 30 years old, and have broad surface root systems. To my knowledge the trees are grown from Fuji and Granny Smith rootstock and all I do is layer straw, wood mulch, and organic compost materials in the walk ways. Around the drip line of the tree I have placed red bricks. Once a year I pull up the bricks and all walkways in the orchard garden to aerate, sow cover crop and cultivate soil with green manures for seed germination. The walkways get relayed in the spring time. By fall the walkways are once again mostly covered by straw and wood chips to begin the process again of dry farming. This year I filled four 30lb sacks of apples and there are still apples on the tree today for more juicing, dehydrating, and pocketing for snack time.  Size doesn't matter when the apple taste great. I don't use municipal water to water my grove, I'm a permiculturalist with deep roots in soil building by imitating nature. 
Barbara Scheltus's curator insight, November 11, 2016 5:18 AM
"Permaculture" is actually just a bunch of old, succesful farming and gardening techniques!
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CreatingandGrowingEdibleSchoolyardsManual.pdf


Via Sara Hocamp, plcommunityfarm
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Sara Hocamp's curator insight, June 6, 2013 10:20 PM

Great resource for teachers!!

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How To Use Falling Leaves For A Great Garden Next Year

How To Use Falling Leaves For A Great Garden Next Year | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
Fall has arrived in all it's glory, and that means it's time to use those gorgeous, colorful falling leaves to help recharge your garden.

Via Richard Spencer, plcommunityfarm
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Richard Spencer's curator insight, October 12, 2016 3:52 AM
Here  is  a  great  simple  guide on  the  benefits  of  composting  leaves, and  in  part  two  it  shows  you  this  achieved.
But  I  like  to  add  that  what  I  learnt  from  what  i  taught    at  either  the  Royal  Horticulture  courses    and  in  my  City  and  Guilds  training  - that  leaves need  three  requirements  for  them  to  rot  down.
(1) Air  plenty  of  ventilation   -  the  wooden  pallets  bins  are  ideal  as  well  as  the  simple  wire  mesh  bin   
(2) moisture   
(3)  and  Fungi  to  break  it  down  if  you  think  about  it   leaves  rot  down  perfectly  well  in  the  woods  and  forest   with  out  the  aid  of  grass  
And  for  fungi  to  flourish  it  needs  (1) and  (2)  
(4)  off  course  there  are  insects,micro  organism  and  earth  worms  that  help  too  
all  this  can  be  added  when  you  rake  and  shred  the  leaves  up  and  put  it  in  your  bin  
These  bins  are  best  left  for  a  year  to  break  down  
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8 Fall-Blooming Flowers Friendly to Bees, Birds, and Butterflies - Modern Farmer

8 Fall-Blooming Flowers Friendly to Bees, Birds, and Butterflies - Modern Farmer | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
I’m sure you’ve seen it: Every October the big-box stores haul out a technicolor display of “mums”—overbred chrysanthemum cultivars that look are just a bit too perfect, like they came out of a factory rather than nature’s kingdom. If you’re lucky, they’ll sprinkle a few pansies around for a little variety.

You’d be forgiven for thinking these were the only two species in the world that bear flowers beyond September, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Take a walk in any natural area this time of year, and you’re bound to see some of the dozens of native North American species that come into their full floristic glory after the autumn equinox, each of which plays an important role in local ecosystems.
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Eric Larson's curator insight, October 25, 2016 9:12 AM
8 Fall blooming flowers.
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La Saskatchewan, un leader mondial dans la recherche sur les légumineuses

La Saskatchewan, un leader mondial dans la recherche sur les légumineuses | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it

En plus d'être la première productrice de légumineuses au Canada, la Saskatchewan est aussi un leader mondial dans la recherche sur ces plantes. Des avancées sur l'amélioration des cultures ainsi que la lutte contre les insectes nuisibles et les mauvaises herbes ont notamment été réalisées dans la province.

Un texte de Dominique Brunet-Vaudrin


Yantai Gan fait partie de la douzaine de chercheurs qui axent leurs recherches sur les légumineuses au Centre de recherche et de développement de Swift Current, à environ 200 kilomètres à l'ouest de Regina. Son équipe a découvert que le fait de cultiver des légumineuses en alternance avec des céréales permet d'augmenter la production totale de grains de ces dernières de plus de 35 %. « Les légumineuses préparent cette rotation de cultures extrêmement bien », affirme Yantai Gan.


Un texte de Dominique Brunet-Vaudrin. dominique.brunet.vaudrin@radio-canada.ca


Via Pierre-André Marechal, Pauline
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The Seas Will Save Us: How an Army of Ocean Farmers are Starting an Economic Revolution

The Seas Will Save Us: How an Army of Ocean Farmers are Starting an Economic Revolution | Sustainability: Permaculture, Organic Gardening & Farming, Homesteading, Tools & Implements | Scoop.it
It wasn’t just that we were pillaging. Most of my fish was going to McDonald’s for their fish sandwiches. There I was, still a kid, working one of the most unsustainable forms of food production on the planet, producing some of the most unhealthy food on the planet. But God how I loved that job! The humility of being in 40-foot seas, the sense of solidarity that comes with being in the belly of a boat with 13 other people working 30-hour shifts, and a sense of meaning and pride in helping to feed my country. I miss those days so, so much.
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