Permaculture, Hor...
Follow
Find
1.4K views | +8 today
 
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from Health Supreme
onto Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology
Scoop.it!

More than 230 scientists say GMOs not safe, including developer of first GM crop

More than 230 scientists say GMOs not safe, including developer of first GM crop | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it

The number of scientists who have signed onto a statement challenging the safety of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has climbed to more than 230 today.

 

The list is expected to continue growing as more scientists are given the opportunity to weigh in on the safety of the organisms, which were quietly introduced into the US food supply in the late 1990s with no labeling requirement.

 

One new signature on the list in particular stands out: Dr. Belinda Martineau, a former member of the Michelmore Lab at the University of California Davis Genome Center, who helped commercialize the world’s first GMO whole food, the Flavr Savr tomato.

 

Dr. Martineau issued a statement along with her signature:

 

"I wholeheartedly support this thorough, thoughtful and professional statement describing the lack of scientific consensus on the safety of genetically engineered (GM/GE) crops and other GM/GE organisms (also referred to as GMOs). Society's debate over how best to utilize the powerful technology of genetic engineering is clearly not over. For its supporters to assume it is, is little more than wishful thinking.”


Via Sepp Hasslberger
more...
Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:51 AM

How many scientists does it take to show that the science on a new technology isn't settled, that we don't know whether we should be using it or not. 

 

Government officials who support unlabeled and untested GMOs in our foods better find a different occupation. They aren't worthy to hold a job that gives them responsibility for public health!

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 4, 2013 6:29 PM

It it's true that from the hundreds of GM crops already approved for human and animal consumption somewhere in the world only few have been thoroughly safety tested, we are in a much worse shape than what I've thought.

WalkerKyleForrest's comment, November 8, 2013 9:15 AM
The fact that a couple hundred scientist discovered there is a toxin in the GMO food that destroys red blood cells is terrifying. With that in mind i really am not for GMOS. Maybe if they were developed not to harm us and they could work out the crinkles that would be more ideal to me. KYLE.C
Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Design | WarkaWater

Design | WarkaWater | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it

The Warka’s water harvesting technique and construction system are inspired by several sources. Many plants and animals have developed unique micro- and nano-scale structural features on their surfaces that enable them to collect water from the air and survive in hostile environments. By studying the Namib beetle’s shell, lotus flower leaves, spider web threads and the integrated fog collection system in cactus, we are identifying specific materials and coatings that can enhance dew condensation and water flow and storage capabilities of the mesh. The termite hives have influenced the design of Warka’s outer shell, its airflow, shape and geometry. We also looked at local cultures and vernacular architecture, incorporating traditional Ethiopian basket-weaving techniques in Warka’s design.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Amaranth | Volunteer Gardener

Amaranth is not only pretty in the garden, but its poised to be the super food of the future. It produces a gluten-free, high-protein grain that's easily digestible.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

How to Fight Big Ag and Start Your Own Seed Bank

How to Fight Big Ag and Start Your Own Seed Bank | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
While it’s possible to buy new seeds each season, a fiscally fit gardener knows that cultivating his or her own seeds is nearly as relevant as cultivating the food in their kitchen.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Google's Project Sunroof tells you how much solar energy is hitting your rooftop

Google's Project Sunroof tells you how much solar energy is hitting your rooftop | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
As the world's largest search engine provider, Google is privy to an unfathomable amount of questions about life ( "Where am I?" ), love ( "Why did I get married? "), and yes, cats ( "How to make my cat love me." ). And it says an increasing number...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from SciFrye Home & Garden
Scoop.it!

All About Cover Crops

All About Cover Crops | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it

Infuse your garden soil and plants with nutrients and beneficial microbes with this collection of hardworking, quick-growing, simply amazing cover crops.


Via Kim Frye Housh
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from SciFrye Home & Garden
Scoop.it!

5 Reasons Seeds Do Not Sprout

5 Reasons Seeds Do Not Sprout | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
Nothing is more frustrating than putting your garden together, being careful to have everything in place, and then planting seeds only to have... nothing. Having sprout failures, even just a few, i...

Via Kim Frye Housh
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from SciFrye
Scoop.it!

This new 'green' antenna could double solar panel efficiency

This new 'green' antenna could double solar panel efficiency | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
Solar power keeps on getting smarter and smarter.
DAVID NIELD21 AUG 2015

 
As steady and promising as the rise in solar power use has been, there's still plenty of room left for innovation and improvement: in cell efficiency, in energy storage, in the cost of the hardware, to name a few. And now a new type of antenna could facilitate twice the amount of efficiency in existing solar panels, and help make rooftop solar cells a much more common sight.

A group of scientists from the University of Connecticut in the US have developed the antenna, which collects much more of the blue part of the light spectrum than existing devices do. Today's silicon solar panels aren't very adept at capturing blue photons, so a lot of potential energy is wasted - the cells you currently see on houses will usually only capture 11 to 15 percent of the available energy, which isn't a great return. Panels specially created in laboratories can get this figure up to 25 percent or even higher, but they're prohibitively expensive for the average homeowner.


Now the team believes it has an antenna that can capture double the amount of energy that a standard commercial panel can. The researchers are presenting their work at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

"Many groups around the world are working hard to make this kind of antenna, and ours is the first of its kind in the whole world," lead researcher Challa V. Kumar said in a press release. "Most of the light from the Sun is emitted over a very broad window of wavelengths. If you want to use solar energy to produce electric current, you want to harvest as much of that spectrum as possible."

The key to the new technology is organic dye. Light photons excite dye molecules which can then emit silicon-friendly photons ready to be converted into energy, if the chemical conditions are right: the researchers embed the dyes inside a protein-lipid hydrogel to keep the molecules separated but tightly packed. The resulting thin, pinkish film can be coated on top of a solar cell to vastly improve its efficiency at capturing light.

And while that process might sound complicated, it's actually not too difficult or expensive to do - Kumar says it can be "done in the kitchen or in a remote village" as the situation demands. What's more, the materials involved are compostable and kind to the environment if they need to be abandoned.

The next step is turning this into a commercial product, and the scientists have enlisted the help of a local Connecticut company to try and make this happen. The team is also exploring ways in which the versatile hydrogel could be used for drug delivery and in white light-emitting diodes.

Via Kim Frye Housh
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

No to GMO: Scotland to outlaw growing of GM crops

No to GMO: Scotland to outlaw growing of GM crops | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
Scotland says it will ban genetically modified crops on its soil. According to officials, the move will protect the environment. They are also taking advantage of new EU laws, allowing member states to decide whether they want to grow the crops or not.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Can we level the playing field for coffee growers?

Can we level the playing field for coffee growers? | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it

Here's the background on direct trade and its effect on coffee farmers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Fall Into Spring Flowers, Dijon Green Beans & Membership Drive

Fall Into Spring Flowers, Dijon Green Beans & Membership Drive | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

The Drinkable Book™ | pAge Drinking Paper

The Drinkable Book™ is both a water filter and an instruction manual for how and why to clean drinking water.  This filter is patent pending technology (US Serial No 62/153,395), and works to produce clean drinking water by pouring dirty water through a thick, sturdy sheet of paper embedded with silver nanoparticles (a.k.a. pAge drinking paper), which are lethal for microbes.  This paper was created and shown to be highly antibacterial during Theresa’s Ph.D. at McGill University.  Additionally, these filters meet US EPA guidelines for bacteria removal to produce safe drinking water.  The filters can last a couple of weeks, even up to a month, so the entire books could provide the tools to filter clean water for about a year. While at University of Virginia for her postdoc, Theresa and a team of students tested these filter papers with water sources in South Africa at the University of Venda.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Think you know corn? Chew on this.

Think you know corn? Chew on this. | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it

■ The word “corn” comes from the Old English via Old Norse korn, meaning “grain.” In most of the world, “corn” simply means the cereal crop most dominant in a region and can refer to any number of grains such as rye, wheat or oats. In the United States, what is known as corn was first called Indian corn; the adjective was commonly dropped by the early 1800s. (Although if you search “Indian corn” on the interwebs, you’ll notice that today the term refers to those dried multicolored cobs hanging around at Thanksgiving.) In practically every country but the United States, corn is called maize, coming from the Spanish maiz via the Taino mahiz.


 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from Social Justice, Education, Media, Art, Music, Film, & Technology
Scoop.it!

Occupy the Farm: Documentary Explores Activism in Urban Farming - Food Tank (blog)

Occupy the Farm: Documentary Explores Activism in Urban Farming - Food Tank (blog) | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
Occupy the Farm tells the story of 200 urban farmers in California who took action to save a publicly-owned research farm.

Via jean lievens, Giannis Tompros , The Planetary Archives Digital University
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

BEAUTIFUL EDIBLE LANDSCAPING WITH AMARANTH!

I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (https://www.youtube.com/editor)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Power of plants: Documentary will launch plant-based nutrition campaign - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Power of plants: Documentary will launch plant-based nutrition campaign - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
The Campbells, father and son, call it the most important health breakthrough of all time.  But it’s no magic bullet or amazing new technology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

To Till and to Keep: Towards a New Agriculture | National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition

After the release of Laudato Si: On Care of Our Common Home earlier this summer, Pope Francis has said on occasion that this is a social encyclical, not an ecological one. I believe it can also be read as a political-economic encyclical: Francis takes a clear-eyed look at the modern world and shines a light on where we have gone off track.

In his Encyclical Letter addressed “to all people of good faith,” Pope Francis writes about how we have hurt and mistreated our common home over the last 200 years – which is to say our modern industrial era. This has caused “sister earth, along with all the abandoned of our world, to cry out, pleading that we take another course.” (§53)

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from Social Justice, Education, Media, Art, Music, Film, & Technology
Scoop.it!

The Tesla Battery Heralds the Beginning of the End for Fossil Fuels

The Tesla Battery Heralds the Beginning of the End for Fossil Fuels | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it

Instead of asking, “can we have our own energy system?” communities will be asking, “why can’t we have it?”

The Tesla Energy system launched last week is comprehensive, with global ramifications. The Powerwall system offering 10 kWh is targeted at domestic users. It is complemented by a commercial system termed the Powerpack offering 100 kWh storage, and a stack of 100 such units to form a 10 megawatt-hour storage unit that can be used at the scale of small electricity grids.

Whole communities could build microgrid power-supply systems around such a 10 MWh energy-storage system, fed by renewable-energy generation (wind power or rooftop solar power), at costs that just became supercompetitive.

At his launch last week, Musk maintained that the entire electric-power grid of the US could be replicated with just 160 million of these utility-scale energy-storage units. And two billion of the utility-scale units could provide storage of 20 trillion kWh — electric power for the world.

 

 

more...
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from SciFrye Home & Garden
Scoop.it!

Vermicomposting 101: How to Start a Worm Bin System

Vermicomposting 101: How to Start a Worm Bin System | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
Consider vermicomposting during the winter to provide container plants with nutrient-rich fertilizer.

Via Kim Frye Housh
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from SciFrye
Scoop.it!

Increasing soil fertility with chickens in field rotations

Increasing soil fertility with chickens in field rotations | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it

by Sanne Kure-Jensen

 

John Kenny of Big Train Farm in Cranston, RI uses a four-step process to prepare his fields for planting. After a cash crop is finished, his 100 Black Australorp chickens clean up any crop residue. John said his chickens love green tomatoes.

 

John spreads compost and then runs a chisel plow across the field to deeply loosen and aerate soils without inversion – thus maintaining soil structure. He amends soils as needed to balance available nutrients using rates indicated by soil tests. John then adds micronutrients like Diatomaceous Earth (DE) for silica and micronized azomite.

 

John plants buckwheat for fast, midsummer cover before a late summer planting of cabbages, radishes and beets. Fall-planted rye or oats, vetch and clover over-winter cover and are cleared by chickens in the spring, preparing fields for late springing plantings of summer crops (nightshades, cucurbits, etc).

 

A way to increase soil organic matter and reduce weed pressure is with mulch. Organic practices include covering soil to prevent or minimize compaction from tractor tires, foot traffic or heavy rains. Each fall, John invites local landscapers to drop off leaves from their fall clean up. As the leaf piles grow, John’s cost for purchased straw drops. Each spring, John spreads the leaves across the farm and orders just enough baled straw for the remaining rows.

 

Since adding chickens to his rotations, John has seen his fruit set begin 1-2 weeks earlier. Input costs have dropped, offsetting the cost of the chicken tractor, netting charger and chicks. John now spreads just 2 yards of purchased compost per 6 foot by 150 foot bed without application of NPK fertilizers. Every two weeks, John’s 100 chickens put down 350 pounds of manure or approximately 3 pounds Nitrogen, 4.5 pounds Phosphorous and 1.5 pounds of Potassium. John calculates that his chickens put down $60 worth of manure every two weeks.

 

The income from 6-7 dozen eggs collected daily more than offsets the cost of supplemental poultry feed and mineral supplements. John feeds Poulin Layer Pellets and Crystal Creek Poultry Pro. Pastured chickens graze on cover crops, crop residues and insects as well as crop seconds or outer leaves. John said his chickens really love oats, Bok Choi and any type of squash. John calculates the income and feed cost for his chickens. He typically sells ¾ of the eggs collected over two weeks to bring in $315. John’s grain costs are $140 every two weeks. His net income (without overhead) is $235 every two weeks ($60 fertilizer savings + $315 egg income – $140 chicken feed).

 

John offers his chickens about 4,500 square feet for 2-3 weeks at a time. John knows it is time to move the chickens when they get loud or agitated. The next morning, John and an assistant can move the fence setup and chicken tractor in about an hour. Once on new ground, the chickens forage quietly.

 

When snow covers the ground, the farm’s chickens spend the winter in a portable hoop house. To protect the poly sides, John installs chicken wire inside the perimeter. A vent fan keeps the air fresh in the hoop house through the winter. The sides can be rolled up on warm days.

 

A cover crop will not have time to sprout in the cold in the chicken’s final area each fall. To prevent the manure’s nutrients from volatilizing and to cover the soil, John spread compost and leaves over the last outside area. John found the leaves to be too messy and mucky. Inside the hoop house, he uses pine shavings, which absorb the wet manure. In spring, bedding will be spread or removed from the area where the greenhouse overwintered.

 

John Kenny led a workshop at Big Train Farm for the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Rhode Island (NOFA/RI) called “Raise Better Vegetables with Chickens in Crop Rotations” as part of their free, Collaborative Regional Alliance for Farmer Training (CRAFT) workshop series.


Via Monica S Mcfeeters, Kim Frye Housh
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Ecovillage Survives as a Haven for Deep Ecology in Mexico's Central Mountains

Ecovillage Survives as a Haven for Deep Ecology in Mexico's Central Mountains | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
They cling tenaciously against the unrelenting war that the far more successful liberation of global capital has waged on them.
more...
DebbyBruck's comment, August 22, 11:30 PM
This is a beautiful story Thomas... I think this should really be the way we evolve into our world as communities for the sustainability of our own planet and our wellbeing.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

A Salad Industry Solution to E. Coli Made Things Worse for People and Bees

A Salad Industry Solution to E. Coli Made Things Worse for People and Bees | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
Researchers find that a recommendation to raze wildlands to stop outbreaks of the pathogen had the opposite effect.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University
Scoop.it!

Program Roundup – SARE Funding Available around the Country | National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from Cayo Scoop! Bestofcayo.com's E-mag.
Scoop.it!

AJAW Chocolate Video

AJAW Chocolate Video | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it

AnBeen to AJAW Chocolate yet?  You can make your own chocolate there.  Here's a great video where you can learn about the chocolate tree, and the delicious treat.  Another great video from the 501 Boyz.  Keep them coming.

 

"Adrian is a local tour guide and choclate maker. In this video you will see the process of making the Ajaw Chocolate located in the heart of San Ignacio for a taste of Belize."

 


Via Best of Cayo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from Stories, Ideas of Local Farming and Gardening Movement Covering the Earth
Scoop.it!

28 Urban Farming Projects That Are Changing the World

28 Urban Farming Projects That Are Changing the World | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
Around 15 percent of the world's food is now grown in urban areas. According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, urban farming projects already

Via Robin Kincaid
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from cuisine du 3 me millénaire
Scoop.it!

L'agriculture biologique, plus productive qu'on ne le pense - Le Monde

L'agriculture biologique, plus productive qu'on ne le pense - Le Monde | Permaculture, Horticulture, Homesteading & Green Technology | Scoop.it
Une vaste étude montre que le rendement des exploitations bio peut se rapprocher de celui de l'agriculture conventionnelle.

Via Cécile Lorillon, Nathalie Gaillet-boidin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Planetary Archives Digital University from Plants For The Future: Amaranth, Bamboo, Cannabis, and More
Scoop.it!

Amaranthus: Amaranth Flower, World's Beautiful & Colorful Flower Nature Documentary HD Flower Planet

Amaranthus, collectively known as amaranth,is a cosmopolitan genus of annual or short-lived perennial plants. Some amaranth species are cultivated as leaf ...
more...
No comment yet.