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Food Policy News
EU and global policy concerning the production, distribution, and consumption of food
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Crayfish season starts – what do you need to remember? - Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira

Crayfish season starts – what do you need to remember? - Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

When live crayfish are delivered to notified food premises or food establishments, they must be accompanied by a commercial document, which provides the information about catch area - caught in sea: one of the defined sea areas, or caught in fresh water: country of origin, as well as the scientific name of the species, the amount of crayfish, the delivery date and information on the sender and the recipient.

 

The crayfish season starts on 21 July and runs until the end of October. Usually a total of some 3-4 million crayfish are caught. Most of the caught crayfish are signal crayfish, and noble crayfish make up the rest. To assure food safety after catching, live crayfish must be protected against light and excessive warming, which means the storage cage should be placed deep enough underwater and in a shady location. Water replacement must take place at a high rate inside and around the cage. In order to prevent the spreading of crayfish plague, the storage cages must never be kept in other natural waters than the waters in which the crayfish were caught. Live crayfish must not be moved from one natural waterway to another.

 

And remember: dead crayfish may not be cooked for use as food.

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Kings of the carnivores

Kings of the carnivores | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

Who eats most meat? Vegetarians should look away. The world has a burgeoning appetite for meat. Fifty years ago global consumption was 70m tonnes.


Via Josh Kettell, Mr. David Burton, Jeremy Cherfas
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Wheat Gains as Freezing Weather in Europe May Curb Production -

Wheat Gains as Freezing Weather in Europe May Curb Production - | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

Will the cold in Europe and in Russia and Ukraine influence grain prices?

By Tony C. Dreibus, Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Temperatures reached minus 15 degrees Celsius (5 degrees Fahrenheit) in France’s Alsace and Lorraine regions yesterday, according to forecaster Meteo France. In northern Germany, where some areas lack snow cover, soil temperatures have dropped below minus 8 degrees Celsius, Deutscher Wetterdienst said. Cold weather in the so-called Black Sea region also has hurt crops.

Soil temperatures dropped to minus 20 degrees Celsius for more than two days in the Dnipropetrovsk region, where 44 percent of planted grain failed to emerge after an autumn drought, Adamenko said by telephone from Kiev.

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Eco-Farming or Agro-ecology can double food production in 10 years, says new UN report

GENEVA – Small-scale farmers can double food production within 10 years in critical regions by using ecological methods, a new UN report shows. Based on an extensive review of the recent scientific literature, the study calls for a fundamental shift towards agro ecology as a way to boost food production and improve the situation of the poorest.

 

“To feed 9 billion people in 2050, we urgently need to adopt the most efficient farming techniques available,” says Olivier De Schutter, UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food and author of the report. “Today’s scientific evidence demonstrates that agro ecological methods outperform the use of chemical fertilizers in boosting food production where the hungry live -- especially in unfavorable environments.”

 

Agro ecology applies ecological science to the design of agricultural systems that can help put an end to food crises and address climate-change and poverty challenges. It enhances soils productivity and protects the crops against pests by relying on the natural environment such as beneficial trees, plants, animals and insects.

 

“To date, agro ecological projects have shown an average crop yield increase of 80 per cent in 57 developing countries, with an average increase of 116 per cent for all African projects,” Mr. De Schutter says. “Recent projects conducted in 20 African countries demonstrated a doubling of crop yields over a period of 3-10 years.”

 

“Conventional farming relies on expensive inputs, fuels climate change and is not resilient to climatic shocks. It simply is not the best choice anymore today,” Mr. De Schutter stresses. “A large segment of the scientific community now acknowledges the positive impacts of agro ecology on food production, poverty alleviation and climate change mitigation -- and this is what is needed in a world of limited resources. Malawi, a country that launched a massive chemical fertilizer subsidy program a few years ago, is now implementing agro ecology, benefiting more than 1.3 million of the poorest people, with maize yields increasing from 1 ton/ha to 2-3 tons/ha.”

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Food security and agriculture - the missing part of the picture

Food security and agriculture - the missing part of the picture | Food Policy News | Scoop.it
It’s been very clear – from the submissions to the Rio+20 compilation document, the
statements at Rio+20 preparatory meetings, and in numerous research papers- that food security and sustainable agriculture need serious attention at the Rio+20 Conference in June. A commitment to resilient and equitable food system must be the goal.

Via CGIAR Climate
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India’s Food Security Challenges

India’s Food Security Challenges | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

In the original article Steven Forrest (2011) said: "Agriculture is very important to India, employing 55% of its population and providing 16.5% of its annual GDP. The industry as a whole is worth US$ 17.5 million alone in exports." Read more on India’s Food Security Challenges.

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Current and Potential Trade in Horticultural Products Irradiated for Phytosanitary Purposes

Current and Potential Trade in Horticultural Products Irradiated for Phytosanitary Purposes | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

Life Sciences Social Network highlights the research, which examined the trade in horticultural products irradiated for phytosanitary purposes and market growth potential for the irradiated horticultural products per commodities and regions, since regulatory conditions become more favorable.

 

The paper "Current and Potential Trade in Horticultural Products Irradiated for Phytosanitary Purposes" describes strategies for enhancing trade in irradiated fresh fruits such as mango, papaya, citrus, grapes, and vegetables such as tomatoes, onions, asparagus, garlic, and peppers from Asia and the Americas, which show the greatest potential for the application of this phytosanitary treatment method. 

 

The reason for phytosanitary treatments are frequently intercepted fruits and vegetable in international trade due to the fact that these commodities harbour very harmful pests and diseases, which can spread in the country of destination and be harmful for plants and nature there. Interception is usually done at border inspection post of country of import and in case of suspicion goods are kept in quarantine pending laboratory confirmation of regulated harmful organisms. Goods are released, if the lab results are negative, or after effective phytosanitary treatment. Since pests and diseases, which are invasive in Europe, often come with plant goods of Asian or American origin, pre-shipment phytosanitary treatment is good solution for logistics in international trade. The international standard ISPM 28 presents in its Annexes phytosanitary treatments evaluated and adopted by the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures.

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The Frustrating Lot Of The American Sweet Corn Grower

The Frustrating Lot Of The American Sweet Corn Grower | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

There are significant sweet corn acres in 24 US states and a total of >260,000 acres nation-wide for the fresh market and >300,000 for canned and frozen corn (see graph below). Sweet corn can be difficult to grow for many reasons, and is often sprayed with insecticides. A biotech solution to this problem exists, but it is under-utilized, in part, due to campaigns by anti-GMO activists. In the end, the people most hurt by this are the American sweet corn growers.

The author, Steve Savage, is an agricultural scientist (plant pathology) with >30 years of experience in agricultural technology. He has worked for Colorado State University, DuPont (fungicide development), Mycogen... The Graph is based on USDA-NASS Data.  You are welcome to comment here and/or to email me a savage.sd@gmail.com

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Incredible, Edible Bugs

Incredible, Edible Bugs | Food Policy News | Scoop.it
Incredible, Edible Bugs: Will Meals of Mealworms Catch on in US?PBS NewsHourBRIAN FISHER, entomologist, California Academy of Sciences: I'm not only an entomologist. I'm an entomophagist. What is that?
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Ukrainian Agriculture Ministry Advocates Bolstering Efforts To Counteract Illegal Turnover Of Foodstuffs

Ukrainian Agriculture Ministry Advocates Bolstering Efforts To Counteract Illegal Turnover Of Foodstuffs | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

The Ukrainian Minister of Agrarian Policy and Food Supplies Mykola Prysiazhniuk underlined importance of fight against contraband and gave a task to the State Veterinary and Phytosanitary Service to step up struggle against illegal turnover of products for ensuring safety of the country's food market.

The Minister underlined, quality and safety of agricultural commodities that are exported and realised at the home market need tough control, which is possible only with a package approach towards the management system in the provinces.
Following results of the panel meeting, the Veterinary Service says in a statement that an urgent issue remains expansion of the market outlets for animal derived materials, specifically in the European Union.


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The Invasivore Movement: 4 Invasive Species That Taste Great

The Invasivore Movement: 4 Invasive Species That Taste Great | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

The most effective method for dealing with the peskiest of invasive species: Turn them into dinner.

Sarah Parson described how Puerto Rico is giving new meaning to the phrase “eating your problems.” Officials recently unveiled an aggressive plan to eliminate some of the island’s peskiest invasive species: native iguanas, invasive Asian carp from China, fast-growing Japanese vine plant 'Kudzu' and invasive signal crayfish.

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2012 Annual Letter From Bill Gates | Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

2012 Annual Letter From Bill Gates | Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation | Food Policy News | Scoop.it
Read Bill Gates’ 2012 Annual Letter update on the Gates Foundation’s work in health, poverty, and education.
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Plant-based foods decrease risk of health problems | Buzz About Health

Plant-based foods decrease risk of health problems | Buzz About Health | Food Policy News | Scoop.it
Flavonoids found in various fruits, vegetables, and beverages have been linked to benefiting human health by reducing the risk of major health problems.
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Discovery of plant 'nourishing gene' brings hope for increased crop seed yield and food security

Discovery of plant 'nourishing gene' brings hope for increased crop seed yield and food security | Food Policy News | Scoop.it

InDaily: January 17th 2012: University Warwick scientists discovered "nourishing gene" which controls transfer nutrients from plant to seed - significant step which could help increase global food production. The original research paper was published in Current Biology under the title Maternal control of nutrient allocation in plant seeds by genomic imprinting.

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