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4 ways wearables will transform the healthcare experience

4 ways wearables will transform the healthcare experience | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it

Wearable technologies are set to transform health and wellness experiences and massively increase our expectations of health and wellness services.


This customer shift will transform the health and wellness industry as a whole, dragging regulation and governance kicking and screaming into the 21st century.


Because there’s nothing quite like a vast, shouting mob (of wealthy voters) to drive change.


But first, a little background.

The smartphone IS the killer wearable

Most of us have a smartphone. Comscore reports 69% of US citizens and 62% of Canadians own one. Every day more of us are connecting them to our daily activities, homes, cars and communities.

The expanding universe of “wearable” sensors and peripherals are often simply data inputs for a smartphone-based experience. We expect to see few devices succeed without this symbiotic relationship. Those that try, usually offer an experience that’s inferior to simply pulling out your phone.


The major smartphone manufacturers are heavily invested in developing wearable “ecosystems” around their devices. Through close-range sensing technologies like BLE (iBeacon), NFC and RFID, plus increased availability of mobile web access through Wi-Fi hotspots and cheaper data plans, there’s every reason to expect this trend to continue.


The smartphone already is a wearable. And it’s the hub – a “life tracker” with a growing entourage of sensory peripherals on our bodies, in our homes and all around us.

We’ll share our lives in return for transformative wellness experiences

A paradigm shift is coming to the world of health and wellness. With the devices on our bodies and in our pockets gathering useful data about our movements, behaviours, preferences and wellbeing, more informed decisions become available.


So what happens next?1. The value we receive from sharing our wellness data will erode our privacy fears.2. Augmented reality will eventually become the new normal for healthcare professionals.3. Personal healthcare innovations will be swiftly subsumed into the major ecosystems. (Apple and Google)4. Healthcare providers need to embed digital capabilities, fast


- See more at: http://blog.thirdscreen.com.au/blog/2014/07/17/4-ways-wearables-will-transform-the-healthcare-experience/#sthash.18sChtZa.QuHsWyMK.dpuf



Via nrip
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

Having wearable technology that aids in healthcare is indeed an ideal. As this futuristic idea is one that will shed positivity to many aspects of healthcare monitoring, this article is carefully framed in a way that presents this technology as one that is more advantageous than detrimental.

 

The "impression management" of such a technology is done in a positive way that would allow people to digest and accept this new technology with an open mind. Even the listing of the limitations of this technology was rounded off with possible solutions to give a flawless image that would not arouse negative suspicions.

 

The overall article does provide sufficient knowledge on wearable technology and also effectively gives a two sided argument on the pros and cons of it, without ruining its good branding image.

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Mediterranean diet gives longer life

Mediterranean diet gives longer life | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
A Mediterranean diet with large amounts of vegetables and fish gives a longer life. This is the unanimous result of four studies to be published by the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

It has been known for a long time that the Mediterranean diet is rich in many essential vitamins and minerals that other forms of diet usually lacks (e.g. Omega 3). That said, many people fall under the "aware public" where they are guilty of bad diets formed from cultural backgrounds but do not act on it. Although it is not a reasonable idea to alter behaviours by simply telling someone that he or she is under a bad diet, it is however necessary for one person to kick start a change in lifestyle and food choices before others may follow.

 

This is especially important in families where groupthink is easier to foster; kick start a healthy lifestyle and have others slowly conform to these new habits. Poor food choices will be out the window in no time!

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UW-Madison health survey adds children, fitness monitors - Madison.com

UW-Madison health survey adds children, fitness monitors - Madison.com | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
UW-Madison health survey adds children, fitness monitors
Madison.com
Faye Abitz, an interviewer with the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin, measures the height of Seppi Walsh, 5, in Madison during a practice run last week.
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

Many of us may view the information age as an era of fast convenient information where information can be attained with just a click of a mouse. However, this article has shown that many information we have today still stems from traditional data gathering such as interviews, surveys etc.

 

In this write up, research has been done to monitor the fitness level of children by doing traditional survey methods to gather information, and also track sleeping patterns to understand the factors that make a person healthy.

 

The main purpose of this article is not only to inform people of this on going research, but also to inform the public that health monitoring starts at a young age as many health issues that arise with age is triggered by health mistakes committed at a young age.

 

Apart from all the information provided about the research, the overall intended consequence of the article is driven at inducing a lifestyle change in both the young and old.

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5 fad diets we wish would go away forever

5 fad diets we wish would go away forever | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
Spring is around the corner and so will be a new crop of fad diets eager to help you get into shape. Be on the lookout for a return of these repackaged crazy f

Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

Myth busting fad diets and giving reasons why some of them simply do not work. A bit of information triangulating will tell us that although the information provided in this article is true, some of these fad diets have worked amazingly for some people out there.

 

Although the article does not offer clarity on the effectiveness of these diets, it does provide good information on the disadvantages of some diets, in which such knowledge would come to good use when deciding whether or not to carry on with these diets.

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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, March 30, 2013 1:48 PM

FIve diets that have no research support and make little common sense but have had significant popularity.  Eat what you enjoy, but stay lean: avoid what you don't love and continually reasses what you can do without.

Vincent D'Antonio's curator insight, June 10, 2013 6:01 AM

Fad diets

Daddyjo's curator insight, July 21, 8:18 AM

Fad diets are just a bunch of bogus nonsense. They make you feel lethargic, tired and weak. At the end of the diet, you may have lost weight, but it is mostly water weight and the minute you go back to your old diet, you gain back everything you have 'lost' and are back to square one. I've done fad diets alot in my past and trust me, it doesn't work! #eatclean

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Four Ways to Help Patients Find Reliable Online Health Information

Four Ways to Help Patients Find Reliable Online Health Information | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it


Most physicians agree that we have an ethical obligation to help educate our patients about what’s going on with their health, but what does that look like in a world overwhelmed with digital health information? And how do we budget appropriate time when we’re already struggling to balance shorter appointment times, more documentation requirements, and busier clinic schedules?

It’s estimated that 72 percent of patients get a majority of their health information online. With an abundance of biased and incorrect information on the Internet, our responsibility as physicians has evolved from simply teaching patients about their health conditions to now include educatingpatients on where and how to find and identify reliable health information.

This premise goes back to why I use social media. We have a responsibility to share, or at the very least be cognizant of, reliable health information in the realm where our patients seek it. In the old days that looked like an exam room; today it looks like a Google search.

Here are four ways to efficiently help ensure patients have the resources they need to find reliable health information, despite cramped clinic visits and time constraints.

Ask: How can you possibly know where patients find their information if you don’t ask? I have patients come in with birth plans all the time and quite frequently they’ve printed them out from a website with little-to-no additional research into the (often very specific) things they’ve requested. You can’t possibly know or understand their views unless you ask.

Take Two: I understand how limited our time is – I’m a resident with a busy clinic and short, often over-booked appointment slots. But taking two minutes to discuss reliable health information with your patients has great potential for improving patient care and decreasing un-needed visits and calls.

Prep: Have pre-written, condition-specific information for your patients and include curated links to additional reliable information for those who may want it. It’s as simple as a “dot-phrase” on most major EMR systems or a copy/paste file you can quickly email or print.

Encourage: Encourage your patients to take control of their health by being informed.Encourage them to ask questions and explain things back to you, so you’re certain they have a grasp on it. Encourage them to share what they’ve learned in their searches.


Via Plus91
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

"Crap detection" is what we have learnt from being bombarded with a massive amount of information online. In a world where "Big Data" is our online reality now, it is difficult to differentiate what is useful data and what isn't.

 

Similar to the traditional steps learnt about "crap detection" - e.g. checking for credibility, this article effectively sums up "crap detection" of online health information in just 4 steps: ask, take two, prep, and encourage.

 

To know more about these 4 steps and what they are specifically, you'll have to read it to find out!

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Annemarie Nier's curator insight, July 21, 1:36 AM

Online marketing in the healthcare sector is all about helping patients find the information they need. Encourage them to ask the right questions, help them find the answers.

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Poor Teens' Health May Benefit From Top Schools - ABC News

Poor Teens' Health May Benefit From Top Schools - ABC News | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
Poor Teens' Health May Benefit From Top Schools
ABC News
Risky health behavior including binge-drinking, unsafe sex and use of hard drugs was less common among these kids, compared with peers who went to mostly worse schools.
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

"Educational outcomes are just so critical for people's well-being," as quoted from Prof. Harold Pollack. Indeed, education plays an important role in every aspect of our life, including health. This article highlighted that elite schools generally have a lower rate of students engaging in risky health behavior including binge-drinking, unsafe sex and use of hard drugs.

 

Besides giving a brief summary of the issue, the article also stated several reasons for such findings e.g. some people cannot afford to send their children to elite schools.

 

The third person effect may rise from this issue as the lower income people may underestimate the effect of this mediated information on them and choose to not allow it to alter their decision of sending their children to such schools, considering that they might not be able to afford sending their children to better schools.

 

It is also the effect of self-motivated social desirability where one does not wish to be influenced by mass media for the sake of retaining self-esteem. In this case, people may choose to ignore the message to retain their self-esteem, suppressing the idea that their inability to send their children to better schools may be at the expense of their children's health.

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Woman eats dog food for 30 days to prove it's healthier than most human foods - Fox News

Woman eats dog food for 30 days to prove it's healthier than most human foods - Fox News | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
Fox News
Woman eats dog food for 30 days to prove it's healthier than most human foods
Fox News
It's one of the biggest food-related insults out there: That looks like dog food. Yet one woman in Washington state is setting out to change that.
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

This article definitely caught my interest as my own knowledge of pet foods have taught me that it is simply not meant for human consumption! While the article does not go into detail of how pet foods are harmful for humans, the idea that humans should not consume animal foods was effectively summarized into this single phrase "it's also smart to eat foods created for a human's immune system and recommended daily allowance of vitamins and minerals.".

 

Of course, animal foods do not contain the essential minerals and vitamins that the human body require. Based on my own knowledge of pet foods, some of it contains animal by-products, which are harmful to BOTH animals and humans!

 

As for the lady who ate dog food to prove a point that animal foods are healthier, she may have backfired her plan by inducing a whole lot of unintended consequences such as damaging her own health, and also having really negative public opinions pinned on her.

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Healthy Snacking - American Heart Association

Healthy Snacking - American Heart Association | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
The American Heart Association helps you find healthy alternatives to unhealthy snacks. Try these!
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

A short article that effectively sums up several types of healthy snacks in the order of taste! Crunchy, munchy, thirst quenchers and sweet.

 

This is definitely for the low-context people who needs specific food examples to replace their current unhealthy foods, instead of just getting the usual vague "cut down on sugar" comment that does not explicitly infer on the actual meaning of it.

 

Additional information such as the vitamins and minerals content of these foods could be provided to better communicate the benefits of these healthier choices.

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Health Risk Assessments Are A Powerful Component of Population Health Management

Health Risk Assessments Are A Powerful Component of Population Health Management | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
Health Risk Assessments (HRAs) are a powerful component of population health management strategies for healthcare organizations.

Via nrip
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

Health Risk Assessments have been used by healthcare organisations as a health management strategy for many years. This article emphasises on the extend of these benefits to not only employees in workplaces but also spouses and other dependents over 18.

 

This key information was placed at the start of the article as an agenda setting technique to inform audiences that benefits are extended to family members due to the importance of health care assessments that many are not practicing.

 

In my personal opinion, I do feel that this effectively communicates the importance of monitoring one's health, and also communicates a message to let employees recognise that their healthcare organisations care about their health and well-being. An organization that extends such benefits to its employees create a more inclusive and motivated workforce that will reap rewards in the near future!

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kamagra-hilfe.com's curator insight, March 10, 2:19 AM

potenzmittel rezeptfrei

http://kamagra-hilfe.com/
yoga accessories's curator insight, May 6, 11:31 PM

http://slashdot.org/submission/3541153/yoga-apparel-cheap

Sherri Altman's curator insight, September 15, 6:53 PM

Curious how these metrics compare to the HRA we have deployed to our consumers.  As an organization we have decided to target key chronic conditions to help reduce costs. What other prevention programs could or should we be considering to assist our members?

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4 ways wearables will transform the healthcare experience

4 ways wearables will transform the healthcare experience | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it

Wearable technologies are set to transform health and wellness experiences and massively increase our expectations of health and wellness services.


This customer shift will transform the health and wellness industry as a whole, dragging regulation and governance kicking and screaming into the 21st century.


Because there’s nothing quite like a vast, shouting mob (of wealthy voters) to drive change.


But first, a little background.

The smartphone IS the killer wearable

Most of us have a smartphone. Comscore reports 69% of US citizens and 62% of Canadians own one. Every day more of us are connecting them to our daily activities, homes, cars and communities.

The expanding universe of “wearable” sensors and peripherals are often simply data inputs for a smartphone-based experience. We expect to see few devices succeed without this symbiotic relationship. Those that try, usually offer an experience that’s inferior to simply pulling out your phone.


The major smartphone manufacturers are heavily invested in developing wearable “ecosystems” around their devices. Through close-range sensing technologies like BLE (iBeacon), NFC and RFID, plus increased availability of mobile web access through Wi-Fi hotspots and cheaper data plans, there’s every reason to expect this trend to continue.


The smartphone already is a wearable. And it’s the hub – a “life tracker” with a growing entourage of sensory peripherals on our bodies, in our homes and all around us.

We’ll share our lives in return for transformative wellness experiences

A paradigm shift is coming to the world of health and wellness. With the devices on our bodies and in our pockets gathering useful data about our movements, behaviours, preferences and wellbeing, more informed decisions become available.


So what happens next?1. The value we receive from sharing our wellness data will erode our privacy fears.2. Augmented reality will eventually become the new normal for healthcare professionals.3. Personal healthcare innovations will be swiftly subsumed into the major ecosystems. (Apple and Google)4. Healthcare providers need to embed digital capabilities, fast


- See more at: http://blog.thirdscreen.com.au/blog/2014/07/17/4-ways-wearables-will-transform-the-healthcare-experience/#sthash.18sChtZa.QuHsWyMK.dpuf



Via nrip
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

Having wearable technology that aids in healthcare is indeed an ideal. As this futuristic idea is one that will shed positivity to many aspects of healthcare monitoring, this article is carefully framed in a way that presents this technology as one that is more advantageous than detrimental.

 

The "impression management" of such a technology is done in a positive way that would allow people to digest and accept this new technology with an open mind. Even the listing of the limitations of this technology was rounded off with possible solutions to give a flawless image that would not arouse negative suspicions.

 

The overall article does provide sufficient knowledge on wearable technology and also effectively gives a two sided argument on the pros and cons of it, without ruining its good branding image.

more...
No comment yet.
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Ask the Diet Doctor: The Upside of Energy Drinks - Shape

Ask the Diet Doctor: The Upside of Energy Drinks - Shape | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
Our diet doctor addresses the pros and cons of downing a can when you're in need of a boost.
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

While many of us down energy drinks without thinking twice, this short article addresses the disadvantages of these seemingly healthy drinks that many may be unaware of.

The write up addresses the negative effects of these energy drinks such as over dosage which may cause similar effects to the overdose of caffeine, and also to avoid consuming them with alcohol.

 

However, it gives a balanced argument by also highlighting the advantages of these drinks, such as the inclusion sugar and B-Vitamins to boost metabolism and replenish lost bodily fluids. 

 

This write up is also a great example of the provision of information that has manifested several obvious characteristics of the information age; similar topics such as "11 all natural instant energy boosters" are available through convenient hyperlinks throughout the article, and also having the possibility of information overload with the availability of several sources that provide similar information.

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Exercise and diet may prevent Alzheimer's

Exercise and diet may prevent Alzheimer's | Food Health and Nutrition | Scoop.it
TheHealthSite Exercise and diet may prevent Alzheimer's TheHealthSite alzheimers-prevention The Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER Study) suggested that following a healthy lifestyle with...

Via 27Alzheimer’s
Zheng Pupeng Megan's insight:

Alzheimer's disease is a scary but real disability that severely impairs a person's way of life. While the article addresses the issue of Alzheimer's and how diet and exercise can play a major role in preventing it, it specifically targets the younger generations who might face this disease in the future. The article contains links that provides specific exercises and diets that one can practice from an early age, to prevent this degenerative disease.

 

Understanding the two step flow model also helps us realize that the youths are the best opinion leaders in these healthcare issues due to the impact that they can make with family members at home. Younger adults can be the driving force for healthy living at home, advocating good lifestyles that can prevent unnecessary diseases from occurring.

 

As the saying goes - everything starts at a young age!

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