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PERU: Peru’s hake TAC gets 30% boost

PERU: Peru’s hake TAC gets 30% boost | food | Scoop.it

The Peruvian hake industry got a boost this week when Peru’s Ministry of Production increased the total allowable catch (TAC) for the first hake season of the year by 30% from the 13,740 tons allocated in December to a total of 17,880.

 

The change comes from the latest recommendations of the Instituto del Mar del Peru (Imarpe), which found that the abundance of the hake resource in the first quarter of this year was up 60% compared to 2012.

 

The TAC is set in December each year for the A season, which runs from January through June 30 this year, but the ministry has revised the quota upwards during the season for the past two years due to higher-than-predicted biomass reassessments during the season, hake seller and I.P. Santa Monica CEO Stephan Palinginis told Undercurrent News.

 

Imarpe, Peru’s marine research agency responsible for setting the quota, has observers on board the commercial fishing boats to collect data on the biomass during the season, and the results from January to May of this year “were exceptional,” Palinginis said.

 

Biomass estimates are up 60% over last year, drawing speculation that the lower availability of squid this year may be allowing hake to flourish more.

“This is very good data for the biomass,” Palinginis said. “We haven’t seen that in the last 20 years.”

 

The quota for B season, which will be announced after the research finishes June 15, is likely to increase over A season, he said.

 

Undercurrent News

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Rainbow Accreditation Tasmania

Rainbow Accreditation Tasmania | food | Scoop.it
How to get the Rainbow Tasmania Tourism Accreditation logo for your business (In an Australian first, Tasmania’s tourism industry has developed a new accreditation program to help local...

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Rainbow Accreditation Tasmania

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Chem 211 - Thin Layer Chromatography

Chem 211 - Thin Layer Chromatography | food | Scoop.it

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TLC

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Angela Stubbs's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:14 PM

Chromatography is a sophisticated method of separating mixtures of two or more compounds. The separation is accomplished by the distribution of the mixture between two phases: one that is stationary and one that is moving. Chromatography works on the principle that different compounds will have different solubilities and adsorption to the two phases between which they are to be partitioned.

FOOD SERVICES NO.1 TESTING/CERTIFICATION/INSPEC/ GIREESAN's curator insight, September 15, 2015 1:22 PM

 Thin Layer Chromatography

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CHP - Chromatography Introduction


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CHP

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Angela Stubbs's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:29 PM

Chromatography is a separations method that relies on differences in partitioning behavior between a flowing mobile phase and a stationary phase to separate the the components in a mixture.

A column (or other support for TLC, see below) holds the stationary phase and the mobile phase carries the sample through it. Sample components that partition strongly into the stationary phase spend a greater amount of time in the column and are separated from components that stay predominantly in the mobile phase and pass through the column faster.

 
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Gas Chromatography

Gas Chromatography | food | Scoop.it

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Dietary diversification for prevention of anaemia among women of childbearing age from rural India - Rao &al (2013) - PHN

Dietary diversification for prevention of anaemia among women of childbearing age from rural India - Rao &al (2013) - PHN | food | Scoop.it

To assess the impact of an intervention modifying dietary habits for the prevention of anaemia in rural India... Intervention study with data on anthropometric (weight, height) measurements, Hb and diet pattern...

 

Rural non-pregnant women (n 317) of childbearing age (15–35 years)... After 1 year of intervention, mean Hb increased... significantly... with a consequent reduction in the prevalence of anaemia (from 82·0 % to 55·4 %) as well as Fe-deficiency anaemia (from 30·3 % to 10·8 %). 

Gain in Hb was inversely associated with the initial level of Hb. Significant gain in Hb (0·57 g/dl) was observed among women attending >50 % of the meetings or repeating >50 % of the recipes at home (0·45 g/dl) in the non-supplemented group and was smaller than that observed in the supplemented group. 

Developing action programmes for improving nutritional awareness to enhance the consumption of Fe-rich foods has great potential for preventing anaemia in rural India.


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NUTRITION -INDIA

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Alexander J. Stein's curator insight, April 18, 2013 9:57 PM

Question is how much such a programme costs (relative to its impact and relative to the cost-effectiveness of other micronutrient interventions) and how easy it can be scaled up from three villages to cover a country of >1 billion people. 

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Biotechnology for Enhanced Nutritional Quality in Plants - Ozgur &al (2013) - Crit Rev Plant Sci

Biotechnology for Enhanced Nutritional Quality in Plants - Ozgur &al (2013) - Crit Rev Plant Sci | food | Scoop.it

With almost 870 million people estimated to suffer from chronic hunger worldwide, undernourishment represents a major problem that severely affects people in developing countries. In addition to undernourishment, micronutrient deficiency alone can be a cause of serious illness and death.

 

Large portions of the world population rely on a single, starch-rich crop as their primary energy source and these staple crops are generally not rich sources of micronutrients. As a result, physical and mental health problems related to micronutrient deficiencies are estimated to affect around two billion people worldwide. The situation is expected to get worse in parallel with the expanding world population.

 

Improving the nutritional quality of staple crops seems to be an effective and straightforward solution to the problem. Conventional breeding has long been employed for this purpose but success has been limited to the existing diversity in the gene pool. However, biotechnology enables addition or improvement of any nutrient, even those that are scarce or totally absent in a crop species. In addition, biotechnology introduces speed to the biofortification process compared to conventional breeding.

 

Genetic engineering was successfully employed to improve a wide variety of nutritional traits over the last decade. In the present review, progress toward engineering various types of major and minor constituents for the improvement of plant nutritional quality is discussed... 

 

Although biotechnology has proven successful in improving the nutritional value of a wide variety of crop species, only a few of such crops are approved for human consumption. These crops include soybean lines with altered oil properties (high oleic acid, high omega-3 fatty acid and decreased saturated fatty acids), maize with increased lysine content and rice with reduced allergenicity.

 

Since the aim of such work is to alleviate nutrient-related health problems, regulatory approval and commercialization defines the usefulness of the biofortification strategy. The case of Golden Rice exemplifies this as it has not yet been approved for commercialization. Thus, in addition to scientific questions, societal questions involved in the biotechnological improvement of nutritional quality must be considered...


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BIOTECHNOLOGY- NUTRITION

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Getting more popular - Organic Produce and Sustainable Seafoods - Global Aqua Link

Getting more popular - Organic Produce and Sustainable Seafoods - Global Aqua Link | food | Scoop.it
Organic and certified sustainability seafoods are increasingly popular, they are also healthier and environmentally less damaging than traditional foods.

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organic produces sustainable seafood

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Americans eating more smoked seafood products - Chicago Daily Herald

Americans eating more smoked seafood products - Chicago Daily Herald | food | Scoop.it
Americans eating more smoked seafood products Chicago Daily Herald The federal government doesn't track smoked seafood consumption, but sales at 18,000 supermarkets, mass merchandisers and club chains jumped 17 percent last year, 12 percent in 2011...

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Australia's BridgeClimb to Attract Chinese Tourists - CRIENGLISH.com - CRIENGLISH.com

Australia's BridgeClimb to Attract Chinese Tourists - CRIENGLISH.com - CRIENGLISH.com | food | Scoop.it
Australia's BridgeClimb to Attract Chinese Tourists - CRIENGLISH.com
CRIENGLISH.com
"Gosh, it's been a fantastic growth coming in from China. In fact in our own case I think the number coming to BridgeClimb is up 30-35 percent from last year.

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Australia's BridgeClimb to Attract Chinese Tourists 

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Introduction to Chromatography | Science of Chromatography

Introduction to Chromatography | Science of Chromatography | food | Scoop.it

Chromatography is the science of separating mixtures from complex to simple. It is a collective term for a set of laboratory techniques as well as equipments used by scientists. Chromatography techniques are either preparative or analytical.


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SEPARATION

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Paper Chromatography Ascending Method | Science of Chromatography

Paper Chromatography Ascending Method | Science of Chromatography | food | Scoop.it

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PAPER CHROMATOGRAPHY

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Angela Stubbs's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:23 PM

All types of chromatography

FOOD SERVICES NO.1 TESTING/CERTIFICATION/INSPEC/ GIREESAN's curator insight, September 15, 2015 1:22 PM

Paper Chromatography Ascending Method

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Waters: How Does High Performance Liquid Chromatography Work?

Waters: How Does High Performance Liquid Chromatography Work? | food | Scoop.it
How Does High Performance Liquid Chromatography Work?

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HPLC

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Angela Stubbs's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:33 PM
How Does High Performance Liquid Chromatography Work?

The components of a basic high-performance liquid chromatography [HPLC] system are shown in the simple diagram in Figure E.

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Strategies for vitamin B6 biofortification of plants: A dual role as a micronutrient and a stress protectant - Vanderschuren &al (2013) - Frontiers Plant Physiol

Strategies for vitamin B6 biofortification of plants: A dual role as a micronutrient and a stress protectant - Vanderschuren &al (2013) - Frontiers Plant Physiol | food | Scoop.it

Vitamin B6 has an essential role in cells as a cofactor for several metabolic enzymes. It has also been shown to function as a potent antioxidant molecule. The recent elucidation of the vitamin B6 biosynthesis pathways in plants provides opportunities for characterizing their importance during developmental processes and exposure to stress.

 

Humans and animals must acquire vitamin B6 with their diet, with plants being a major source, because they cannot biosynthesize it de novo. However, the abundance of the vitamin in the edible portions of the most commonly consumed plants is not sufficient to meet daily requirements.

 

Genetic engineering has proven successful in increasing the vitamin B6 content in the model plant Arabidopsis. The added benefits associated with the enhanced vitamin B6 content, such as higher biomass and resistance to abiotic stress, suggest that increasing this essential micronutrient could be a valuable option to improve the nutritional quality and stress tolerance of crop plants.

 

This review summarizes current achievements in biofortification of vitamin B6 and considers strategies for increasing vitamin B6 levels in crop plants for human health and nutrition.


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VITAMIN B16 BIOFORTIFICATION

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Reducing arsenic in food chain - U Delaware (2013)

Reducing arsenic in food chain - U Delaware (2013) | food | Scoop.it

Harsh Bais and Janine Sherrier of the University of Delaware... are studying whether a naturally occurring soil bacterium... UD1023... can create an iron barrier in rice roots that reduces arsenic uptake.

 

Rice, grown as a staple food for a large portion of the world’s population, absorbs arsenic from the environment and transfers it to the grain. Arsenic is classified as a poison by the National Institutes of Health and is considered a carcinogen by the National Toxicology Program... 

 

The risks of arsenic in rice were recently highlighted in the national press, when arsenic was detected in baby foods made from rice. In regions of the world where rice is the major component of the human diet, the health of entire communities of people can be negatively impacted by arsenic contamination of rice. 

 

Arsenic may occur naturally in the soil, as it does in many parts of Southeast Asia, or it may be a result of environmental contamination. Despite the health risks arsenic in rice poses to millions of people around the world, there are currently no effective agricultural methods in use to reduce arsenic levels.

 

Sherrier... and Bais... are investigating whether UD1023 - which is naturally found in the rhizosphere, the layer of soil and microbes adjacent to rice roots - can be used to block the arsenic uptake... The pair’s preliminary research has shown that UD1023 can mobilize iron from the soil and slow arsenic uptake in rice roots, but the researchers have not yet determined exactly how this process works and whether it will lead to reduced levels of arsenic in rice grains.

 

Sherrier and Bais... ultimately want to determine how UD1023 slows arsenic movement into rice roots and whether it will lead to reduced levels of arsenic in the rice grains, the edible portion of the plant. “That is the most important part... We don’t know yet whether we can reduce arsenic in the grains or reduce the upward movement of arsenic towards the grain, but we’re optimistic.”

 

Bais says that, if successful, the project could lead to practical applications in agriculture. “The implications could be tremendous... Coating seeds with bacteria is very easy. With this bacteria, you could implement easy, low-cost strategies that farmers could use that would reduce arsenic in the human food chain.”


Via Alexander J. Stein
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ARSENIC

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Iodine status during pregnancy in India and related neonatal and infant outcomes - Lean &al (2013) - Public Health Nutr

Iodine status during pregnancy in India and related neonatal and infant outcomes - Lean &al (2013) - Public Health Nutr | food | Scoop.it

Longitudinal study following mothers through pregnancy and offspring up to 24 months. Rural health-care centre (Vadu) and urban antenatal clinic (Pune) in the Maharashtra region of India. Pregnant mothers at 17 (n 132) and 34 weeks’ (n 151) gestation and their infants from birth to the age of 24 months.

 

Median urinary iodine concentration (UIC) was 203 and 211 μg/l at 17 and 34 weeks of pregnancy, respectively (range 26–800 μg/l). Using the UIC distribution adjusted for within-person variation, extreme UIC quartiles were compared for predictors and outcomes. There was no correlation between UIC at 17 and 34 weeks, but 24 % of those with UIC in the lowest quartile at 17 weeks had UIC in the same lowest quartile at 34 weeks.

 

Maternal educational, socio-economic status and milk products consumption (frequency) were different between the lowest and highest quartile of UIC at 34 weeks. Selected offspring developmental outcomes differed between the lowest and highest UIC quartiles (abdominal circumference at 24 months, subscapular and triceps skinfolds at 12 and 24 months). However, UIC was only a weak predictor of subscapular skinfold at 12 months and of triceps skinfold at 24 months.

 

Median UIC in this pregnant population suggested adequate dietary provision at both gestational stages studied. Occasional high results found in spot samples may indicate intermittent consumption of iodine-rich foods. Maternal UIC had limited influence on offspring developmental outcomes.


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iodine

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Fuel cell technology boosts long-distance fish shipping | Global Aqua Link

Fuel cell technology boosts long-distance fish shipping | Global Aqua Link | food | Scoop.it
A maritime milestone will be set this week as a container of 18 tons of fresh salmon from Chile is offloaded from a cargo ship in California after a month at sea -- without being frozen.

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distance fishshipping

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India to improve nutrition with biofortified crops, including zinc-rich wheat

India to improve nutrition with biofortified crops, including zinc-rich wheat | food | Scoop.it
Nutritional deficiency among Indians can be tackled by introducing biofortified varieties of staples like wheat and rice, say experts.

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India to improve nutrition with biofortified crops, including zinc-rich wheat

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