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6 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Avocados

6 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Avocados | Food | Scoop.it
You know they make a killer eggocado and are beloved among guacamole aficionados. You might also know you can feel good eating one, thanks to healthy fats and loads of nutrients.
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Food Art : le dressage d'un plat devient un art geek - Be Geek

Food Art : le dressage d'un plat devient un art geek - Be Geek | Food | Scoop.it
Etre à la fois geek et gourmand peut tout à fait être compatible, la preuve en image.
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Trick Yourself into Eating Vegetables

Trick Yourself into Eating Vegetables | Food | Scoop.it
You can convince your brain that broccoli is a steak! (5 HEALTHY ways to make your food taste better: http://t.co/voUswu3AOK)
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Prehistoric Europeans spiced their food with garlic mustard at least 6,000 years ago

Prehistoric Europeans spiced their food with garlic mustard at least 6,000 years ago | Food | Scoop.it
Prehistoric Europeans were spicing up their food over 6,000 years ago with garlic mustard, according to a study of old pottery.

 

Researchers found evidence for garlic mustard in the residues left on ancient pottery shards discovered in what is now Denmark and Germany. The spice was found alongside fat residues from meat and fish.

 

The scientists make the case that garlic mustard contains little nutritional value and therefore must have been used to flavor the foods. "This is the earliest evidence, as far as I know, of spice use in this region in the Western Baltic; something that has basically no nutritional value, but has this value in a taste sense," said Dr Hayley Saul, who led the study from the University of York, UK.

 

The researchers looked at charred deposits found on the inside of pottery shards that had been dated to between 5,800 and 6,150 years ago.

 

These deposits contained microscopic traces of plant-based silica, known as phytoliths, which can be used to identify the plants from which they came.

It was these phytoliths that provided the evidence of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) in the carbonised scrapings.

 

The team found more phytoliths from residues taken from the inside of pots than from the outside, which they say shows that these were the direct result of culinary practice.

 

The implications from these findings challenge the previously held belief that hunter-gatherers were simply concerned with searching for calorific food. Dr Saul believes these latest results point to something much more like cuisine.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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What's so healthy about Japanese food? | Just Hungry

What's so healthy about Japanese food? | Just Hungry | Food | Scoop.it
Just Hungry is a food site dedicated to Japanese home cooking recipes for people living outside of Japan and healthy and delicious eating.

Via Frank Kusters
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Marketing Food to Children: Anna Lappe at TEDxManhattan

Author and activist Anna Lappe takes on the billion-dollar business of marketing junk food, soda, and fast food to children and teens. With diet-related rela...
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