GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS
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GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS
These articles address food, water and environment issues that relate to farmers and consumers to enable their personal and local control over those matters
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What You Need to Know About Fukushima | News & Notes, What Matters Today | BillMoyers.com

What You Need to Know About Fukushima | News & Notes, What Matters Today | BillMoyers.com | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it
Workers at the Fukushima nuclear power plant have started removing fuel rods in a new, potentially dangerous stage of the cleanup.
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

Wow!

 

Excerpt:

For two years now, the plant’s operator and the Japanese government have struggled to contain an ongoing series of crises at the devastated facility. But the situation has the potential to get worse. Here’s what you need to know..............

 

Later this month, Tepco is expected to begin the delicate task of removing over 1,500 spent fuel rodsfrom reactor number 4, which was heavily damaged by the March 2011 explosion. The rods contain radiation at levels 14,000 times greater than what was released when America dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. It’s a highly dangerous operation that has never been attempted on such a scale before, and a key part of decommissioning the facility, which could cost $50 billion and take 40 years...........[Click the title to read more details.]

 

 

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Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from sustainable architecture
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Rotterdam’s Solar-Powered Floating Pavilion is an Experimental Climate-Proof Development

Rotterdam’s Solar-Powered Floating Pavilion is an Experimental Climate-Proof Development | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it

Rotterdam’s Floating Pavilion by Deltasync and PublicDomain Architects is the first pilot project for a sustainable floating district.

 

In an effort to address the challenges of climate change and sea level rise, the City of Rotterdam has started to build some intriguing floating structures. The first pilot project is a catalyst for climate change-proof architecture called the Floating Pavilion that consists of three connected hemispheres that look like bubbles anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor.

An initiative of Rotterdam Climate Proof (part of the Rotterdam Climate Initiative), the mixed-use pavilion was designed by Deltasync and Public Domain Architects, and it sets an unprecedented example for innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture.


Via Lauren Moss
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bancoideas's curator insight, January 3, 2013 1:34 PM

Que no se diga que no se puede

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 3, 2013 4:16 PM

Quel projet créatif!

ElenaArcausdeLabadie's comment, January 9, 2013 7:16 PM
Impresionante proyecto, qué tecnología constructiva!
Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from Geography Education
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Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly more precious than oil by tapping hidden reserves of water in the Syrian Desert.

Via Seth Dixon
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

I have seen some of the greening of the Saudi desert myself. This is a site to behold.

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Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:37 PM

More and more in the news, people have noticed that oil is the hot topic to discuss. Although oil is a very importance economic source, water is a resource that can sustain the population and keep people alive. Saudi Arabia over the years has developed a huge areas of green fields growing in areas of what is Saudi Arabias desert. Saudi Arabia reaches these underground rivers and lakes by drilling through the desert floor, directly irrigating the fields with a circular sprinkler system. This technique is called center-pivot irrigation. This is so important because even if the country has the money to buy resources like food and water, it is developing these agricultural fields which is allowing them to export products such as wheat, dates, dairy products, eggs, fish, poultry, fruits, vegetables and flowers to markets around the world. Saudi Arabia can now supply its people with these products that they use to import. This is extremely important to the current development in Saudi Arabia. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:27 PM

Saudi Arabia is a very rich in drilling industry for oil. However many of these fields are green are popping up all over the place as drilling is occuring. Why is this? Well much of the drilling releases water that is trapped within the rocks. This water then flows to the surface where it creates a underground water puddle that keeps the soils moist which in turn allows for greens and other plants to grow. This is more commonly known as water drilling.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:08 PM
These random fields of green are coming from the rocks that still have water that is trapped inside them from the last ice age. Saudi Arabia reaches these underground rivers and lakes by drilling through the desert floor, directly irrigating the fields with a circular sprinkler system. This technique is called center-pivot irrigation. Because of low rainfall, they get minimum water each year. Hydrologists estimate water will only be able to be pumped out for 50 years. With water popping up fields of green, a new agricultural economy will appear, maybe farming life and new resources that the country never had for their people, they will now have.