GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS
6.0K views | +0 today
Follow
GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS
These articles address food, water and environment issues that relate to farmers and consumers to enable their personal and local control over those matters
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Luminous Moon-Gate Taichung City Cultural Center

Luminous Moon-Gate Taichung City Cultural Center | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it

Luminous Moon-Gate was designed in 2013 for the Taichung City Cultural Center International Competition. The objective was to design a public library and fine arts museum to distinguish itself as a city with arts and culture at its core. To achieve this, the design firm was tasked with creating accessible, attractive, and flexible space, and a rich social and recreational learning environment.

The Moon-Gate follows the philosophy that, with a commitment to improving society, architecture is inherently sustainable. High porosity between buildings allows wind to freely flow around the exteriors; low porosity materials facilitate better control over water and heat retention. Filtration systems throughout the interior and under-slab ventilation maintain steady temperatures. High-efficiency photovoltaic panels installed on top of the library and museum take advantage of the large surface area exposed to the sun, while energy-efficient lighting provides energy savings.


Via Lauren Moss
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

Sustainable building can enrich our lives while keeping the planet healthy.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from green streets
Scoop.it!

A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen

A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it
How the world's wealthiest cities can beat back climate change.

 

From the Atlantic Cities:

 

Alex Steffen calls himself a planetary futurist. That means he has confronted some grim realities in the nearly 10 years since he founded Worldchanging.com, an online publication that pioneered coverage of climate change and related issues in the early years of the 21st century.  
He’s kept busy writing and speaking about creative, sustainable solutions that could help us find a way to survive and even thrive in the face of a planetary challenge that political leaders in the United States have been reluctant to face.
His most recent book, which comes out November 26, is called Carbon Zero: Imagining Cities That Can Save the Planet. In it, he lays out his case that "remaking the world’s wealthiest cities over the next 20 years may prove the best—perhaps the only—chance we have of avoiding planetary catastrophe."

I talked with Steffen the other day via Skype about post-Sandy climate politics, how to "ruggedize" a city, and whether we’re all doomed. This is an edited version of our conversation.


Visit the link for the article & interview...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Beautiful, Innovative, and Sustainable: The Future of Green Architecture

Beautiful, Innovative, and Sustainable: The Future of Green Architecture | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it

Today, architecture finds itself at a crossroads.

Building materials and new construction, along with the operation and maintenance of buildings, account for a significant sum of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Faced with this fact, how are architects to responsibly pursue the act (and art) of architecture without further deteriorating the planet’s environmental make-up or depleting its resources?

What forms of high and low technology can be developed to curtail the injurious side of building?

Can good—or even great—architecture be sustainable?

 

The answer, of course, is yes. The best buildings have always shown a concern for their immediate environs and how they fit in them, whether they were conscious of “sustainability” or not. Now, all architects and buildings are expected to be engaged with sustainable standards, such as LEED titles, photovoltaic cells, or green roofs—all things that these 10 projects have in common. Check out our favorite projects in architecture + sustainability...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Lauren Moss's curator insight, January 17, 2013 6:32 PM

A curated collection of (relatively) recent sustainable building projects that highlight innovative approaches to environmental design and green building, with links provided for additional information and details.

Paige's curator insight, August 6, 2014 2:47 PM

Green architecture! I've dreamt and have considered going into a field of real estate specializing in the building and selling of eco-friendly homes!

Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Eneco sustainable headquarters in Rotterdam, Netherlands

Eneco sustainable headquarters in Rotterdam, Netherlands | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it

Amsterdam-based Hofman Dujardin Architects, in collaboration with Fokkema & Partners, has helped sustainable energy company Eneco practice what it preaches with the design of its headquarters in Rotterdam. The 14-floor office has been operational since April, with employees enjoying one of the Europe's best workspaces.


The heart of the building is a central atrium surrounded by a light-filled meeting centre with a reception space, meeting rooms, working areas, informal meeting areas, lounges, restaurant, service desk and auditorium. Sun collectors on the south façade and on the roof track the sun throughout the day, absorbing the maximum amount of solar energy.

The working and meeting areas are designed to be energetic islands floating on a white terrazzo floor. Some islands are open spaces and others enclosed for privacy but they are all executed with vibrant colours and materials. Those on the ground floor are red, purple and orange, while those on the first floor are in different shades of verdant green (meeting rooms) and blue (working spaces). The diversity of color and materials on the work islands are not only lively and inviting but give the different spaces specific identities and atmospheres that enable people to orientate themselves better in the office.


Learn more about the sustainable strategies incorporated into the design of this green office space at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.