GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS
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GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS
These articles address food, water and environment issues that relate to farmers and consumers to enable their personal and local control over those matters
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Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from Le Marche and Food
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Bianchetti Truffle Hunting Video

Fresh truffles are one of the world’s most highly prized ingredients, but they’re also one of the hardest to find.  Expert foragers search the forests of Europe for these little culinary gems, using their knowledge of the fungus’ preferences to find the most likely spot.

Like other wild produce (wild mushrooms, wild vegetables, etc) truffles grow where Mother Nature dictates.  They actually have a symbiotic relationship with tree roots.  Which trees they prefer can vary with the truffle species, but in general oak, hazelnut & beech glades are a good place to look.

They’re often obscured by debris on the forest floor, so foragers usually employ animals to help uncover them – typically trained pigs or dogs.  Truffles evolved to reproduce by being consumed (their spores are distributed through animal excrement), so when they’re ripe they emit a powerful aroma to attract animals to eat them.

Justin had a chance to forage for bianchetti truffles during a recent trip to Italy, and he brought a camera along so you could see what it’s like. [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

OK just couldn't resist scooping this!

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Julie Thompson's curator insight, February 7, 2015 2:43 PM

Do what?!  I want so much to try truffles, and would love to get my shepherds trained to truffle hunt. On my to do list for sure.

Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from Le Marche and Food
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Zeppole di San Giuseppe, St. Joseph's Day Cream Puffs

Zeppole di San Giuseppe, St. Joseph's Day Cream Puffs | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it

Being a Catholic country, Father’s Day is Italy is celebrated on March 19, the feast of St. Joseph. The feast is associated with a number sweet and savory dishes, but none more so perhaps than the  fancy, sweet version of zeppole usually called, appropriately enough, zeppole di san Giuseppe. Sweet zeppole are made with a cooked dough enriched with butter and eggs, formed into little balls and deep fried and, more often than not, filled with crema pasticcera or pastry cream. 

 

Ingredients
For a plateful

250ml water100g butterA pinch of salt125g flour (pastry flour or all-purpose)Sugar (at least a spoonful, more to taste)4 eggs (or 2 whole eggs and 2 yolks)Grated lemon zest (or a drop of limoncello) (optional)

For frying: vegetable oil, olive oil and/or lard

Confectioner’s sugar1 cup or more of pastry cream Directions
Via Mariano Pallottini
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Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from Le Marche and Food
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Fave dei Morti, tradition of the Day of the Dead

Fave dei Morti, tradition of the Day of the Dead | GMOs & FOOD, WATER & SOIL MATTERS | Scoop.it

Fave dei morti or Beans of the dead are sort of almond cookies, shaped like beans, flavored ground almonds, cinnamon and lemon juice.

Ingredients For 5 persons:

75 grams (about 2 1/2 ounces) almonds 60 grams (about 2 ounces) sugar or glucose 50 grams (about 1 2/3 ounces) of flour 1/2 tablespoon of cinnamon 30 grams (about 1 ounce) of butter a vial of lemon juice 1 egg 20 grams (about 2/3 of an ounce) of Italian baking powder for sweets (e.g. Paneangeli) 5 grams (about 1/5 of an ounce) vanillaEgg wash Egg white, beatenIngredienti (Original Italian text) Per 5 persone: 75g di mandorle 60g di zucchero o di glucosio 50g di farina 1/2 cucchiaio di cannella 30g di burro una fialetta (al limone) 1 uovo 1 chiara d'uovo 20 g di lievito baching 5 g vaniglia

 

Directions


Via Mariano Pallottini
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

Fun food for the season!

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Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, October 21, 2013 11:56 AM

Bones of the dead or Beans of the dead, even today in some countries of Italy, on the night between 1 and 2 November, people respect the tradition leaving these cakes on dinner tables, sure to be visited by their dead.