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Global flight paths | Geography Education

Global flight paths | Geography Education | following geography education | Scoop.it
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe. (Cool geovisualization images!
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Infographic: Sea Level Rise and Global Warming | UCSUSA

Infographic: Sea Level Rise and Global Warming | UCSUSA | following geography education | Scoop.it
Sea level is rising -- and at an accelerating rate -- largely in response to global warming.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:56 PM

What is causing the sea level to rise? Where are the "hot spots" where the sea will rise the fastest? How quickly is land ice melting? 

These and many other questions related to sea level rise and global warming are shared in this infographic created by the Union of Concerned Scientists. There are also links to two additional resources. One is called "Causes of Sea Level Rise: What the Science Tells Us" and the other discusses the methodology and assumptions made in the creation of the infographic. It is also possible to download the infographic in sections. There are four facts discussed in the infographic:

* Global average sea level rise has increased 8 inches since 1880...

* Global warming is the primary cause of sea level rise.

* Sea level rise is accelerating.

* The choices we make today will determine how high sea level rises this century, how fast it occurs, and how much time we have to protect our communities.

Vloasis's curator insight, June 8, 2013 3:48 AM

Projections will vary on this, but it doesn't take a general consensus to see that it's happening.

Keith Thorogood's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:21 PM

What is causing the sea level to rise? Where are the "hot spots" where the sea will rise the fastest? How quickly is land ice melting? 

These and many other questions related to sea level rise and global warming are shared in this infographic created by the Union of Concerned Scientists. There are also links to two additional resources. One is called "Causes of Sea Level Rise: What the Science Tells Us" and the other discusses the methodology and assumptions made in the creation of the infographic. It is also possible to download the infographic in sections. There are four facts discussed in the infographic:

* Global average sea level rise has increased 8 inches since 1880...

* Global warming is the primary cause of sea level rise.

* Sea level rise is accelerating.

* The choices we make today will determine how high sea level rises this century, how fast it occurs, and how much time we have to protect our communities

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Australia ranked 'happiest' nation

Australia ranked 'happiest' nation | following geography education | Scoop.it
Australia is ranked as the world's happiest nation among developed economies, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. ("Happiest" country? Australia. Better lifestyle & geography?
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Run That Town

Run That Town | following geography education | Scoop.it
Run That Town is a strategy game that lets you take control of any neighbourhood in Australia and use real Census data to make decisions that affect your story. Choose from hundreds of projects for your town.
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Frost & Sullivan: China to See Unparalleled Urban Growth with 13 Mega Cities, 4 Mega Regions and 6 Mega Corridors by 2025 - The Sacramento Bee

Frost & Sullivan: China to See Unparalleled Urban Growth with 13 Mega Cities, 4 Mega Regions and 6 Mega Corridors by 2025 - The Sacramento Bee | following geography education | Scoop.it

/PRNewswire/ -- China is set to become the largest economy in the world by 2025 with a nominal GDP value of US$38 trillion.

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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth. High heat and lower pressure at the base of the mantle facilitates melting of the rock. This melt, called magma, rises through cracks to the surface and forms volcanoes. As the tectonic plate moves over the stationary hot spot, the volcanoes are rafted away and new ones form in their place.


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 5:10 PM

Never really understood how island chains were made until now.  As the plate moves the iland is no longer growing and it begins to erode as a new island is created for the hotspot doesn't move the plate does.  That explains why the island of Hawaii is the largest island in the Hawaiian Island Chain..it is the yourgest island and the one the is currently under the hotspot...until it moves along the plate..which I do not believe will be in anyones life time.  It also helps explain how atolls were formed.  The plate moved so the island was no longer growing and though erosion of hundreds of thousands of years the center of the large island is gone while the ring is being supported by a coral reef.  Great site that really makes it easy to understand.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 13, 2:09 PM

This video explains the geology of hotspots which are how many of the islands in the Pacific Ocean are formed. Convection of solid, hot material rises to the tectonic plate where it is trapped, heating the rock above to its melting point. The heat then forces the molten rock to the surface where it cools and creates volcanoes. Over millions of years, the tectonic plate drifts, but the hot spot does not, causing a series of volcanoes on the surface. The Hawaiian Islands were formed by this process, which is why the islands progress from large to small, with the smallest islands being the oldest, in the process of eroding completely away.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 6:23 PM

This video entails that mantel and where a hotspot for a volcanic eruption will take place. This video depicts the way at which a hot spot is located and what makes it erupt and cause an eruption in the firt place. It goes step by step ways to see the many different forms of volcanoes and where they start and end up at.

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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | following geography education | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

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Tracy Young's curator insight, May 12, 2013 6:12 PM

Very useful visual tool for exploring patterns of change

oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:24 PM

Exciting!!

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
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Water: Cooperation or Competition | Infographic

Water: Cooperation or Competition | Infographic | following geography education | Scoop.it

To help promote the International Year of Water Cooperation, which is launched this week, this diagram explores the main challenges faced by water cooperation today...


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Mercor's curator insight, February 12, 2013 12:18 PM

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Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds

Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds | following geography education | Scoop.it

An amazing 13-second NASA animation depicting how the globe has warmed during the period of 1950 to 2012.


From our friends at NASA comes this amazing 13-second animation that depicts how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1950. You’ll note an acceleration of the temperature trend in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal.

 

The data come from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York (GISS), which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “All 10 of the warmest years in the GISS analysis have occurred since 1998, continuing a trend of temperatures well above the mid-20th century average.


Via Lauren Moss
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Diedert Debusscher's curator insight, January 28, 2013 4:25 AM

Why we should care about global warming. And keep working on solutions (they exist).

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:55 AM

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What’s Happening to Biodiversity? [infographic]

What’s Happening to Biodiversity? [infographic] | following geography education | Scoop.it

Biodiversity—the variety of plants, animals and ecosystems in the world—is a measure of our planet’s health.


Overexploitation of species, habitat destruction, and the introduction of invasive species are threatening Earth’s biodiversity. It’s time to turn the tide...


Via Lauren Moss
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Social Media Demographics [infographic]

Social Media Demographics [infographic] | following geography education | Scoop.it

Steadily increasing usage worldwide shows remarkable figures about social media demographics...


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Satroni-SEO's comment, November 13, 2012 2:38 PM
You find some brilliant infographics lauren, thanks! Re-scooped!
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The Life of a T-Shirt [Infographic]

The Life of a T-Shirt [Infographic] | following geography education | Scoop.it
The textiles industry is one of the biggest contributors to landfill waste in both the UK and the US.

The fast fashion model that has developed within our consumerist society is promoting negative consumer behaviour across the globe. Throwaway fashion has become the norm, with customers spending minimal amounts of money on a garment that has an unbelievably short life span, meaning it will no doubt end up in the bin.

This infographic, designed by myself for Urban Times in collaboration with TextƧure, provides an insight into the statistics behind the life of a t-shirt (bare in mind that it does not include the entire apparel industry), revealing some shocking facts about the water and energy consumption during the production of a simple t-shirt. It also provides some simple yet effective ways in which everyone can help.


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Social Media Trends 2013: 1.5 Billion People Using Facebook

Social Media Trends 2013: 1.5 Billion People Using Facebook | following geography education | Scoop.it
That’s right! By the end of 2013 there will be 1.3 to 1.5 billion people using Facebook.

Facebook has grown more than 90 percent in just one year in those countries that, only last year, had populations big enough to matter but have not been taken over by Facebook yet.


Visit the link for further information and additional graphs that track this past year's growth of the social media platform in each country identified in the infographic...


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Lauren Moss
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Satroni-SEO's comment, November 12, 2012 3:44 AM
ooh Lauren I may have to follow you - Re-Scooped yet again chick! cheers!
Satroni-SEO's comment, November 12, 2012 3:44 AM
ooh Lauren I may have to follow you - Re-Scooped yet again chick! cheers!
Satroni-SEO's comment, November 12, 2012 3:44 AM
ooh Lauren I may have to follow you - Re-Scooped yet again chick! cheers!
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AS Level Geography Essay Plan

Essay plan template to help AS Level Geography students complete the extended 25 mark essay on the OCR exam paper (RT @TeachingBites Essay writing plan: http://t.co/4GDvyvfP Done for #geography but...
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Global flight paths | Geography Education

Global flight paths | Geography Education | following geography education | Scoop.it
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe. (Cool geovisualization images!
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Disaster looms for Asia's mega-cities, bank warns

Disaster looms for Asia's mega-cities, bank warns | following geography education | Scoop.it

ASIA'S cities are becoming increasingly vulnerable to natural disasters as they struggle with poor planning, population explosions and climate change, the Asian Development Bank has warned.

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | following geography education | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | following geography education | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 20, 9:49 PM

This is a sad reality humans must live with forever and something we as people must learn from. A man made disaster that occurred many years ago has a negative impact on areas surrounding the shrinking Aral Sea to this day. People cannot exploit an area of water this large, as this is not only harming the environment, but many human beings, as well

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 9:24 AM

This startling picture from space of the Aral Sea is heartbreaking.  The destruction of this inland sea is a terrible thing to behold.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 8:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

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Getting into the right mindset for better learning

Getting into the right mindset for better learning | following geography education | Scoop.it

Mark Gleeson once again provides insight into an infographic. This one on fixed vs growth mindset. In this post he states "Originating from Stanford University psychologist/researcher Carol Dweck, its premise (from my initial reflection) is that as learners, we can either improve our intelligence through hard work or that we are born with a skill set and intelligence level that we are stuck with."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 7, 2013 8:58 AM

What do you think? Do your students come to you with a fixed mindset? Is there future pre-determined by birth? Is intelligence static? Or do you students come in with a growth mindset, with the knowledge that learning takes effort and time, the ability to try and fail, and try again (and again...)? Can intelligence be developed?

Gleeson provides an overview of the two mindsets and explores the infographic and the five categories within in it by asking each as a question. Below is one example...but you will find questins for each category in the post (challenges, obstacles, effort, criticism, success of others).

Quoting from the post:

OBSTACLES: Do we allow our children/ourselves to give up when learning becomes too difficult and stay in a growth- limiting ‘comfort zone’? OR Do we expect our childen/ourselves to persist until we overcome those obstacles and celebrate the achievement of success against all odds?And if you would like to watch a short video that discusses fixed mindset check out this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhLJPhxuvGM.

Mary Cunningham's curator insight, April 7, 2013 12:54 PM

This fits really well with the SIM work that has been happening!  It is a nice visual representation of the Dwek work.

 

Jaimee's curator insight, March 5, 10:06 AM

People/Students do not go for the challenges because they are scared of failure. With failure come consequences fro example low grades. Anyone can say the grade doesn't matter  it is what you learned, however without the grade you can lose out on getting accepted into colleges or fail a class. 

 

This article is about  about how one can reach success by having a growth mindset.  By gaining and having the drive to gain more knowledge. 

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Infographic: Feeding 7 Billion People And Counting

Infographic: Feeding 7 Billion People And Counting | following geography education | Scoop.it

Inspired by a recent Wall Street Journal article, Sustainable America has created the following infographic to show how food is wasted and lost around the world, and what can be done about it.


Food waste and food security are serious problems, but there are current solutions and ways you can help. Read on to learn more, and stay tuned for our next blog post, which will delve deeper into some of the points made by Lappe and Nierenberg in the Wall Street Journal piece.


Via Lauren Moss
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Creativity Angel's comment, February 4, 2013 2:30 AM
Insects are the solution, more than 1,000,000,000 people on the planet eat insects every day.
Creativity Angel's curator insight, February 4, 2013 2:31 AM

Insects are the solution. Western people has to use to know that more than 1,000,000,000 people on the planet eat insects every day and they are the most effective food.

Mercor's curator insight, February 4, 2013 5:45 AM

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Why a Four Degree Celsius Warmer World Must Be Avoided: Infographic

Why a Four Degree Celsius Warmer World Must Be Avoided: Infographic | following geography education | Scoop.it

The World Bank has issued a new report on global warming entitled 'Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4 Degree C Warmer World Must Be Avoided.'


Why should we avoid it?

Because it would be verging on apocalyptic. Coral reefs dead, rainforests dead, sections of the tropics becoming uninhabitable due to heat, spreading deserts, ice sheets collapsing, rising sea levels inundating cities and entire countries. The infographic below tries to be optimistic, but it is best to know the truth: we are currently a ship of fools sailing for planetary-scale disaster.

The lack of political will is leading to a situation in which we are being forced into the geoengineering option, because the technical solution, no matter how crazy it is, is not as difficult as the moral-political solution...


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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 22, 2013 5:01 PM

If the US Federal Government can not agree on fiscal reforms, what makes anyone think that longer term problems like global warming can be addressed with sufficient advanced planning to avert global warming.  We are probably not going to do anything sufficient to reverse this invitable trend, so why not simply accept the consequences and deal with them as a given?  Low lying lands will be gone, so don't buy any beachfront property not on a cliff.  Farming will need to adapt.  Our microorganisms will hopefully adapt.  We will likely have some food crisis but we do have the technology to handle many problems, and things will be easier if we start to wean ourselves off of carbon based fuels.  Many cities will be gone but I don't see it as the end of the world. 

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World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic]

World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic] | following geography education | Scoop.it

Politicians and oil companies might waste time debating whether or not we’ve reached peak oil. What they ignore is that we run out completely in under 40 years’ time, by which time a third of the planet’s biodiversity will be lost.

In the meantime, tantalum, that great mainstay of mobile telecoms, will last only a few years more and run out just in time to celebrate the planet breaking the 2oC barrier in 2060.
There’s so much more words could say, but this, a very relevant and informative environmensl visualization, says is so much better...


Via Lauren Moss
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Watch Chocolate's Child Slaves Online | smh.tv

Watch Chocolate's Child Slaves Online | smh.tv | following geography education | Scoop.it
Everyone loves chocolate. But for thousands of people, chocolate is the reason for their enslavement. The chocolate bar you snack on likely starts at a plant in a West African cocoa plantation, and often the people who harvest it are children.

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Expat Explorer Survey

Expat Explorer Survey | following geography education | Scoop.it
If you were moving abroad, what would you want to know? Find out the results from the largest ever global independent survey of expats. Gain a unique insight into how expat life differs across the globe.

 

The labor market is increasingly becoming a global market.  These countries are the leading places for expatriate workers based on economic and experience factors (according to a survey by HSBC).  You can adjust the criteria to see how these 30 countries as destinations for workers that aren't afraid to move internationally.

 

Tags: labor, globalization, industry, economic.


Via Seth Dixon, Shane Hamilton
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ExpatsLivingAbroad's curator insight, September 5, 2013 4:13 PM

Things you need or want to know in advance of selecting a new place to live!

ExpatsLivingAbroad's curator insight, September 20, 2013 10:49 PM

Check out the responses from the survey

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How Organic is it? (infographic)

How Organic is it? (infographic) | following geography education | Scoop.it

Organic, 100% organic, some of this is organic... it's easy to see why we need a deciphering tool. In an effort to make the best food choices for families and the environment, we often choose organic.

What does the organic label really mean? It tells you that organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. It is a promise to you that plant foods are produced without using most conventional pesticides. That your fruit and veggies didn’t come to that lovely size and color with use of fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge, bioengineering or ionizing radiation...

This infographic is a straightforward explanation of what organic means to livestock and fruit and vegetables.


Via Lauren Moss
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