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How Organic is it? (infographic)

How Organic is it? (infographic) | following geography education | Scoop.it

Organic, 100% organic, some of this is organic... it's easy to see why we need a deciphering tool. In an effort to make the best food choices for families and the environment, we often choose organic.

What does the organic label really mean? It tells you that organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. It is a promise to you that plant foods are produced without using most conventional pesticides. That your fruit and veggies didn’t come to that lovely size and color with use of fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge, bioengineering or ionizing radiation...

This infographic is a straightforward explanation of what organic means to livestock and fruit and vegetables.


Via Lauren Moss
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BBC - GCSE Bitesize - Geographical skills

A secondary school revision resource for GCSE Geography on the topic of geographical skills, like map reading and interpreting photographs.

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INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem

INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem | following geography education | Scoop.it

Every year, an estimated 1.2 to 2 billion tons of food is wasted—a massive amount of food that, if saved, would be more enough to feed the world’s hungry. Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money. To put food wastage in perspective, Arbtech created an infographic that points out some of the world’s worst offenders and explains how food loss occurs throughout the supply chain. Click through to learn more about food waste and, most importantly, what you can do to help.


Via Lauren Moss
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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:02 AM

Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money.

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How Volcanoes Work - controls on eruption style

How Volcanoes Work - controls on eruption style | following geography education | Scoop.it
Viscosity of magma for beginners http://t.co/faomdPyxWx
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Rocky Rex's Science Stuff: Greenland - the melting ice giant

Rocky Rex's Science Stuff: Greenland - the melting ice giant | following geography education | Scoop.it
RT @MercianRockyRex: Greenland http://t.co/Wm5xFPq0Sm #climatechange #globalwarming #advertising #realestate #history #geography #geology #…
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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | following geography education | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.
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The country training people to leave

The country training people to leave | following geography education | Scoop.it
The Philippines doesn't have enough jobs to go around, so every year the government teaches thousands of people the skills they need to get jobs abroad.
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Infographic: Sea Level Rise and Global Warming | UCSUSA

Infographic: Sea Level Rise and Global Warming | UCSUSA | following geography education | Scoop.it
Sea level is rising -- and at an accelerating rate -- largely in response to global warming.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:56 PM

What is causing the sea level to rise? Where are the "hot spots" where the sea will rise the fastest? How quickly is land ice melting? 

These and many other questions related to sea level rise and global warming are shared in this infographic created by the Union of Concerned Scientists. There are also links to two additional resources. One is called "Causes of Sea Level Rise: What the Science Tells Us" and the other discusses the methodology and assumptions made in the creation of the infographic. It is also possible to download the infographic in sections. There are four facts discussed in the infographic:

* Global average sea level rise has increased 8 inches since 1880...

* Global warming is the primary cause of sea level rise.

* Sea level rise is accelerating.

* The choices we make today will determine how high sea level rises this century, how fast it occurs, and how much time we have to protect our communities.

Vloasis's curator insight, June 8, 2013 3:48 AM

Projections will vary on this, but it doesn't take a general consensus to see that it's happening.

Keith Thorogood's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:21 PM

What is causing the sea level to rise? Where are the "hot spots" where the sea will rise the fastest? How quickly is land ice melting? 

These and many other questions related to sea level rise and global warming are shared in this infographic created by the Union of Concerned Scientists. There are also links to two additional resources. One is called "Causes of Sea Level Rise: What the Science Tells Us" and the other discusses the methodology and assumptions made in the creation of the infographic. It is also possible to download the infographic in sections. There are four facts discussed in the infographic:

* Global average sea level rise has increased 8 inches since 1880...

* Global warming is the primary cause of sea level rise.

* Sea level rise is accelerating.

* The choices we make today will determine how high sea level rises this century, how fast it occurs, and how much time we have to protect our communities

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Australia ranked 'happiest' nation

Australia ranked 'happiest' nation | following geography education | Scoop.it
Australia is ranked as the world's happiest nation among developed economies, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. ("Happiest" country? Australia. Better lifestyle & geography?
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Run That Town

Run That Town | following geography education | Scoop.it
Run That Town is a strategy game that lets you take control of any neighbourhood in Australia and use real Census data to make decisions that affect your story. Choose from hundreds of projects for your town.
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Frost & Sullivan: China to See Unparalleled Urban Growth with 13 Mega Cities, 4 Mega Regions and 6 Mega Corridors by 2025 - The Sacramento Bee

Frost & Sullivan: China to See Unparalleled Urban Growth with 13 Mega Cities, 4 Mega Regions and 6 Mega Corridors by 2025 - The Sacramento Bee | following geography education | Scoop.it

/PRNewswire/ -- China is set to become the largest economy in the world by 2025 with a nominal GDP value of US$38 trillion.

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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth. High heat and lower pressure at the base of the mantle facilitates melting of the rock. This melt, called magma, rises through cracks to the surface and forms volcanoes. As the tectonic plate moves over the stationary hot spot, the volcanoes are rafted away and new ones form in their place.


Via Seth Dixon
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 2015 9:46 PM

While watching this video you can learn a lot about a hotspot in just 2 minutes, understanding that a hotspot is an area in the upper mantle in which heat rises and slowly begins to expand, building up pressure. The magma, which is hot rises and the cold matter sinks. the magma rises through the cracks and the plates actually carry the volcano. How did the whole idea of a volcano occur? Who knows where these volcanos are?  The hotspot can cause volcanos to erupt or even cause the volcanos to spread out, who knew a hotspot could be such a huge influence on the world, causing massive landforms and causing much tragedy.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:33 AM

What is a hotspot? It is a source of localized energy from the seafloor that creates volcanoes. It is not just a shallow reservoir nor a pipe filled with liquid. It is a constant stream of magma that does not move. Simple the plate move over it creating a row of multiple volcanoes, such as the Hawaiian Islands. When the magma erupts thru the surface the magma then turns to lava, and dries to rock. This process repeats until the built up lava is a volcano, still with hotspot in the middle. The plate moves and the hotspot creates a new volcano.

                This is interesting because hotspots are always changing geography, and causing map makers and teachers everywhere to learn new islands. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:18 PM

this is a good way to discover how volcanoes are formed, and if you are trying to understand the Oceania region then this is information you need to know.

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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | following geography education | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:55 AM

summer work KQ2 key concepts: remote sensing, deforestation, desertification, land use, geospatial

Jill Wallace's curator insight, August 20, 2015 7:57 PM

Great images!

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The Uneven Geography of Terrorism

The Uneven Geography of Terrorism | following geography education | Scoop.it

Despite fear and anxiety in the advanced cities of the West, terrorism remains highly concentrated in a small number of conflict-ridden nations.

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Map Skills

Map Skills | following geography education | Scoop.it

Objective: To be able to use and recognise a variety of map symbols and to understand why they are used. IST Learner Profile Link - Knowledgeable & Inquirer Starter: Study this  presentation...

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EU leaders agree to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030

EU leaders agree to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030 | following geography education | Scoop.it
Climate commissioner hails ‘strong signal’ ahead of global Paris summit but key aspects of deal left vague or voluntary
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Discover Geography – a geography resources website - Discover Geography

Discover Geography – a geography resources website - Discover Geography | following geography education | Scoop.it
RT @DTW_Education: The #Holuhraun eruption ended yesterday, see hi-res images on http://t.co/AvgsGxGI07.. http://t.co/VO3u8HTUKh @The_GA ht…
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Dad Teaches Son Geography With Food Puns - POPSUGAR

Dad Teaches Son Geography With Food Puns - POPSUGAR | following geography education | Scoop.it
Parents creating incredible food art with and for their kids is nothing new, but using it as an educational tool sure is.
Debra Owens's insight:

just cause it's fun!

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The World Has A New Island Today

The World Has A New Island Today | following geography education | Scoop.it
A new island has sprung out of the sea - and it's still apparently hot to step on...
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AS Level Geography Essay Plan

Essay plan template to help AS Level Geography students complete the extended 25 mark essay on the OCR exam paper (RT @TeachingBites Essay writing plan: http://t.co/4GDvyvfP Done for #geography but...
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Global flight paths | Geography Education

Global flight paths | Geography Education | following geography education | Scoop.it
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe. (Cool geovisualization images!
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Disaster looms for Asia's mega-cities, bank warns

Disaster looms for Asia's mega-cities, bank warns | following geography education | Scoop.it

ASIA'S cities are becoming increasingly vulnerable to natural disasters as they struggle with poor planning, population explosions and climate change, the Asian Development Bank has warned.

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | following geography education | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | following geography education | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:30 PM

Here is a question. Do you think perhaps in the future this could happen to lake Mead in Nevada/Arizona? With all the non-stop building and no rain perhaps one day could it run dry or do we have a way to stop it.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:17 PM

Once there is less water in a lake there is less water in the air therefore less rain. The long term consequences is that the fishing industry is destroyed where once upon a time there were 61000 workers and now there are under 2000. The water is more saltier. The lands are now ill suited and unbuildable. Also the people there are prone to health problems.