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Are You Hiring for Tomorrow? - Human Capital Institute

Are You Hiring for Tomorrow? - Human Capital Institute | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it
Would consulting Firm A be even more successful if it hired a higher percentage of the best talent compared to Firm B? Is it possible that “hiring people like me” leads to a more engaging, but a less profitable firm?
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Introducing TalentCircles

A cloud-based platform, TalentCircles allows you to build, brand, own and manage your live talent networks, drastically reduce your talent acquisition costs,...

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
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The Recruiting Dilemma: Do You Look for Cultural Fit, or for Innovation?

The Recruiting Dilemma: Do You Look for Cultural Fit, or for Innovation? | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it
“The world hates change, yet it is the only thing that has brought progress.” — Charles Kettering
There’s been a lot written lately about “cultural fit.” In fact, you could say that cultural fit is the latest rage in talent acquisition.

Via Riaz Khan
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3 Ways to Find, Hire and Retain Top Digital Marketing Talent | OMI ...

3 Ways to Find, Hire and Retain Top Digital Marketing Talent | OMI ... | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it
Learn how to find, hire, and retain the best talent in digital marketing. See how to find them on social networks and educate them once they're hired.
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Pre Employment Testing and Screening Software | Chequed

Pre Employment Testing and Screening Software | Chequed | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it
Chequed delivers web software for pre employment testing, employee screening and automated reference checking.
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Questions for Social Media Managers | Social Media Today

Questions for Social Media Managers | Social Media Today | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it
How do you weed out the social media flops from the experienced social media managers that can actually help you grow your business? Asking the right questions during the interview process is the easiest way to find the best talent.

 

However, most companies are hiring a social media manager because they don’t understand how to best use social media and they don’t know which questions they should ask. The following are eleven questions that an experienced and qualified social media manager should be able to confidently answer on the spot. In addition, if you are interested and committed to making social media marketing your career, these are just a few of the  questions you will want to be able to answer at length and in great detail....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 2, 2013 1:28 PM

Great questions to help you choose a staffer/manager or hire a social media consultant.

Rutu Pandya's comment, July 2, 2013 9:47 PM
yes, they really are good questions... though, could you please help me with the second question:
How do you use and leverage the benefits of both LinkedIn Groups and LinkedIn Pages? I am failing to understand it
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The Presenter Manifesto : 8 Distinctions of a World Class Presenter...

A compilation of proven distinctions on what makes a World-Class Presenter. Written by Eric Feng, Presentation Coach ( http://ericfeng.com ) and Designed by Sli

Via Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith
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Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith's curator insight, June 21, 2013 2:26 AM

I really like the clarity and simplicity of the design and it really makes you want to read all 54 slides why because there is a narrative in there kicking it along.  Thanks to ericfeng.com  love your work

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 16, 2014 5:54 PM

Spot on!

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Do you look for cultural fit, or for innovation?

Do you look for cultural fit, or for innovation? | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it

The world hates change, yet it is the only thing that has brought progress. — Charles Kettering

There has been a lot written lately about “cultural fit.” In fact, you could say that cultural fit is the latest rage in talent acquisition.

In an article in the American Sociological Review, Northwestern Professor Lauren Rivera concludes that companies are making hiring decisions today “in a manner more closely resembling the choice of friends or romantic partners.”

The 4 Most-asked Interview Questions

Glassdoor collected 285,000 questions asked by hiring managers. In 2012, the following were the top four asked. Note that they have nothing to do with skills, accomplishments, or experience.

    What’s your favorite movie?
    What’s your favorite website?
    What’s the last book you read for fun?
    What makes you uncomfortable?

Cultural fit is important, but it has its limits.

Here is a case where cultural fit is carried to the extreme. A manager says the best way to get cultural fit is:

Hire lots of relatively inexperienced people. You can indoctrinate people who grow up in your culture more easily than people who grew up in someone else’s company culture. Inexperienced people make up for inexperience with enthusiasm, and often don’t have much of a life.”

Sounds like brainwashing to me!


Most Important Factors for Success

Lets look at a very important attribute that is being overlooked. It is one that CEOs are very focused on right now — innovation.

In a Global CEO Survey conducted by IBM, CEOs identified “creativity” or “innovation” as the most important factor for the successful company of the future.

Although CEOs believe innovation is important, many struggle to implement it because they’re afraid. And the more successful the company, the greater the fear.

The tendency is to hold on to the past — to believe that what made a company successful up to this point will continue to make it successful in the future. Psychologists tell us this is human nature: People fear the unknown.

Sticking with the status quo may have been fine when the world moved at a much slower pace. But in today’s hyper-paced business environment, it is no longer a good excuse. To change quickly in today’s business world, you need to hire innovators — and innovators, by definition, question the status quo.

In her book The Innovation Killer, Cynthia Barton Rabe says that companies and employees rely on “what we know” and “the way we do things here.”
What Keeps Companies From Innovating

But progress demands change. How is it accomplished? Who will take responsibility for an unorthodox decision? Who will be willing to stand up and say that the emperor has no clothes?

Rabe says there are two basic barriers that keep companies from innovating:

 

“GroupThink” is following the herd — being a “yes man.” When employees are sitting in a room with 10 people they have to work with every day, it becomes very difficult not to go along with the group.
   

“ExpertThink” is GroupThink on steroids. It’s the tendency to make decisions based on the opinions of experts. People don’t question experts. They have a healthy respect for them and believe them 100 percent.

Innovators question authority and assumptions. They do things differently. They think differently. They are able to connect ideas in strange and unexpected ways that are unexpected and very valuable to the company. Voicing a different opinion is not a sign that innovators are not “team players.”


Finding Innovation Takes More Work

The downside is that working with innovators slows things down when questions are asked that generate a lot of discussion. Research shows that a team of people that are diverse in some way take longer to arrive at a conclusion than a team that is “homogenous.” But the end result is much better because of all the different ideas and ways of seeing things that are discussed.

Identifying and attracting innovators takes extra work. But the reward when you do find them is that they will end up being some of your most valuable employees.

So go ahead and keep asking job candidates all those silly questions — What’s your favorite movie? What’s your favorite book? If you could be an animal which one would you be?

But listen to the answers a little more closely. And when you hear an answer you’ve never heard before, pay close attention. You just may have found yourself an innovator!


Via Vilma Bonilla
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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, July 17, 2013 3:11 PM

Very interesting talent acquisition question.

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How to Effectively Use Twitter as a Job Search Resource | Mashable

How to Effectively Use Twitter as a Job Search Resource | Mashable | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it

In the age of social media, we have countless outlets for job searching. Platforms such as LinkedIn are the first to come to mind, but can candidates use Twitter to find jobs as well? This past Thursday the HR teams at Twitter and NPR collaborated in the first live #NPRTwitterChataimed at helping job seekers use social media as a job search tool.

 

The chat was centered on six questions that received over 800 tweets from industry professionals all over the U.S., and even some from New Zealand and the UK. Below is a recap of the topics covered in the chat as well as tips you can use in your own job search.

 

To see a cool Storify roundup of the live chat, check out Amplify Talent, the blog run by NPR's Senior Director of Talent Acquisition and Innovation, Lars Schmidt....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 12, 2013 12:43 PM

Lots of useful tips for job hunters...

JobisJob's curator insight, February 27, 2013 6:06 AM

You can also follow the @jobisjob account for updates on the employment market ;)

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Who is Responsible for the Quality of a Hire? | Social Talent

Who is Responsible for the Quality of a Hire? | Social Talent | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it
Someone is ultimately responsible for Talent in an organisation and that person is usually the head of human resources (or talent acquisition or whatever you're calling your Personnel Director these days!
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Most millennials want a different job - Deseret News

Most millennials want a different job - Deseret News | Focus on Recruitment | Scoop.it
Deseret News
Most millennials want a different job
Deseret News
“Talent acquisition managers and heads of human resources make a valid case for their wariness of resumes filled with 1-2-year stints,” she continued.
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