Fly on the Wall: ...
Follow
Find
104 views | +0 today
Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out
Healthcare leadership,change management, interprofessional and clincal education
Curated by Lauren Nichols
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lauren Nichols from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

Beware: 'Wellness' May Be Hazardous to Your Health

Beware: 'Wellness' May Be Hazardous to Your Health | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
“For years employers have offered worksite wellness programs, ranging from newsletters or gym memberships to high stakes incentive programs that change your insurance premiums by thousands of dollars if you lose weight, reduce your blood pressure or b...”
Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Better Care Through Better Processes – An Interview with Hella Ewing, VP and CNO, All Children’s Hospital

Better Care Through Better Processes – An Interview with Hella Ewing, VP and CNO, All Children’s Hospital | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
All Children’s Hospital's patient engagement approach for enhancing the care process.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

RNs want investigation into EMR failure

RNs want investigation into EMR failure | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
“Nurses at a California hospital are asking state officials to investigate the failure of the hospital's electronic medical record system, an incident which they said led to the closure of its emergency room and compromised patient safety.”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Nichols from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

The Far-Reaching Effects of a Fall

The Far-Reaching Effects of a Fall | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
“Older people are the most frequent victims of serious falls. Here are some ways to prevent them.”
Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Engaging Nurses in Culture Change Efforts with the Key to Pandora's Box

Engaging Nurses in Culture Change Efforts with the Key to Pandora's Box | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Any trainer or facilitator that has ever presented to a group of nurses can likely relate to feeling some resistance from them.  Folded arms, scowling faces, and an unwillingness to participate or ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

A nurse training regimen saved Dignity Health $30 million

A nurse training regimen saved Dignity Health $30 million | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Dignity Health saved an estimated $30 million in two years through a training regimen for nurses that focused on preventing avoidable patient harm, such as hospital-acquired infections and patient falls.
Lauren Nichols's insight:

There is lots of work to be done on moving from "discharging" patients to transitioning them to post acute providers and home caregivers. This is something we are working on in our organization and part of that is multidisciplinary rounding that has multi-faceted approach to care in the moment, the plan for transition, identification of barriers to successful transition and mitigating or eliminating those barriers in an effort to prevent unplanned readmission.  We are working to implement a model with "Clinical Expert RN" at the bedside to provide the coaching and support for staff to adhere to best practice bundles and protocols to reduce hospital acquired conditions as well as supporting rounding teams. A change agent at the bedside who can help staff understand the WHY in what they are being asked to do so they can better connect their values, and work to what they can experience as meaningful work, recognizing the importance of their contributions to compassionate, safe, quality care. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Attitudes to technology must change to drive healthcare innovation

Health services are now expected to deliver quality care with a shrinking budget. The digital 'channel shift' could be the answer, but attitudes to technology in the sector must change.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Best Utilize Tablets at Your Medical Facility

5 Ways to Best Utilize Tablets at Your Medical Facility | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
As of August 2013, 47% of doctors used tablets at their practice. These are some of the most productive uses of tablets at medical facilities to date.
Lauren Nichols's insight:

More organizations should be investing in the right resources to identify what devices will improve productivity, safety,  patient experience and better quality/ outcomes.  Using a device to provide patient education that is translatable and designed with health literacy in mind could help prevent readmissions.  Having a platform for virtual classes rooms for staff training could increase standardization to evidence based practices and reduce the cost of training.  I want to pull my hair out when I think about how much time is wasted with our SLOW laptops, outdated web browsers, upgrades every 3 years and intermittent VPN connectivity-UGH!.  We are limited by a  jungle of interfaces due to the lack of a coordinated  strategic approach to identifying and purchasing technology that supports  connectivity to maximize the multidirectional flow of information, storage and retrieval of information, faster test interpretation and reporting, ordering and resulting, biomedical device interfaces and the list goes on. By all means let's just keep FAXING, losing information, losing the ability to charge/bill, decreasing productivity, delaying test results, delaying care, etc ...that can't possibly cost more than the technology investment. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Nature, Art, and Beauty: Antidotes to Everyday Traumas - Point of View - October 2013

Nature, Art, and Beauty: Antidotes to Everyday Traumas - Point of View - October 2013 | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Nichols from Clinical leadership
Scoop.it!

Successful long term care should be person-centred and institutional boundaries must be redrawn or erased

Successful long term care should be person-centred and institutional boundaries must be redrawn or erased | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it

For much of the 20th century, the biomedical model of care constructed around hospitals served us well. It was ideal for a time when a paternalistic approach to disease was deemed as the right way to go. But in a world of Web 2.0, with an ageing demographic and where multiple conditions are becoming the norm, it is no longer appropriate to suggest that "doctor knows best".

In the report, A promise to learn – a commitment to act, Don Berwick, the legendary patient safety guru, set out four guiding principles. One of these is to engage, empower and hear patients and carers throughout the entire system and at all times.

The point made was that engaging and hearing patients will lead us to understand how current experience suggests poor co-ordination between healthcare and community support. It also hints that poor engagement results in individuals not admitting when and with what they need help – and this cannot be good for patients or the professionals trying to help them.

Yet, the solution must lie in the system and not within the walls of an institution. Integration is a term much bandied about in healthcare and could become a weasel word in the healthcare lexicon if the many pilots we have at present are not effectively implemented; if they don't begin to provide more care at home and in the community, and if they don't ensure a more seamless experience.

It's against this background that KPMG recently conducted a survey of 1000 patients, asking them about the future of the NHS. It revealed – surprisingly – that only 36% were comfortable with the idea of using technology, with 54% also arguing that taxes should rise to pay for healthcare.

So the public are ready to have a much more mature and sophisticated dialogue – but we need to support their informed choice so that the hospital and the A&E department are not seen as the inevitable solution.

While news of an additional £500m to A&E departments may defer some of the pain of demand over the winter, the sticking plaster approach is not going to yield the sustainable change required. The best integrated systems in the world have sustained leadership, an effective clinical leadership and engagement and have usually invested considerable sums in their IT infrastructure.

Two examples speak volumes. To begin with, take Virginia Mason in Seattle – where Gary Kaplan, the medically qualified CEO, has been in post for 15 years and where Toyota and Six Sigma approaches to clinical practice are a way of life. He says that "you don't have to be a champion, but you can't be a burier". There's also Kaiser Permanente, where almost 50% of the 9 million population can access their healthcare records online.

Yet despite these great examples of care being made fit for the 21st century, KPMG's latest report, called An Uncertain Age: re-imagining long-term care in the 21st century, suggests that few, if any societies, are facing up to the long-term care problem. Commissioned by the Lien Foundation – a Singapore philanthropic foundation – it makes the point that an ageing population coupled with changing demographics, where people move away from their home base, means the threat of less family support is becoming a reality. Add to this the growing cost of healthcare and the dwindling available funding and we need to redraw the way we provide care and the way we engage the population in that change.

As our report suggests, person-centred care is a must, institutional boundaries must be redrawn or erased and technology must play a part. Perhaps this is Berwick's most important guiding principle as, without that engagement, empowerment and listening we will not be able to make the seismic shift required to a holistic view of the system. In other words, we will not be able to move beyond the walls of the hospital, where patients and the public expect increased autonomy in return for greater responsibility for their health.


Via Chaturika Jayadewa, Medinook, Julie Hankin
more...
Julie Hankin's curator insight, September 7, 2013 4:46 AM

A challenge to start to think outside our organisations and in systems.  This is how our patients experience us

Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

3 Ways to Fight Stress in the Workplace - Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement

3 Ways to Fight Stress in the Workplace - Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Modern workplaces are filled with hard working, motivated people who all have one thing in common: they're incredibly stressed out.
Lauren Nichols's insight:

Remember the flight attendant telling you to put your oxygen mask on first before assisting others? Stress causes us to operate outside our preferred style of communication and leadership and this cause problems with your work team, customers and even your boss. Self care -emotional and physical (relationship with self) is essential to building relationships with others. I love that "Building Great Relationships" is number one on this list.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Beyond Employee Engagement--Why One Intrapreneur Is Worth A Hundred ... - Forbes

Beyond Employee Engagement--Why One Intrapreneur Is Worth A Hundred ... - Forbes | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Beyond Employee Engagement--Why One Intrapreneur Is Worth A Hundred ...
Forbes
Gallup[i] has documented that the national employee engagement rate is 30%.
Lauren Nichols's insight:

We can apply this to healthcare. Instead of taking the engaged for granted and spending tme dragging the actively disengaged along we should spend some time on the highly engaged. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Four Healthcare Changes Happening Now

Four Healthcare Changes Happening Now | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
America, get ready. You’re about to wake up to a whole new world of healthcare. We are moving from a healthcare system of the 1950’s into a model better suited for a population of the 2
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

8 Tips for Engaging Leaders in Your Project | The Improvement Quotient

8 Tips for Engaging Leaders in Your Project | The Improvement Quotient | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Lack of leadership support is one of the most common reasons that a quality improvement project fails. Whether it is executive, administrative or frontline leadership you are trying to convince, we have eight field-tested tips that will enable your leaders to not only support your project, but also advocate for it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

A New Challenge for Studer Group and all the Hospital Smile Consultants - Suzanne Gordon

A New Challenge for Studer Group and all the Hospital Smile Consultants - Suzanne Gordon | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Prime Healthcare deal to buy six Roman Catholic hospitals collapses

Prime Healthcare deal to buy six Roman Catholic hospitals collapses | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
“Prime Healthcare Services Inc.’s proposed deal to buy six financially struggling Roman Catholic hospitals has collapsed, raising questions about how the nonprofit chain will keep its doors open.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Does Your Political Style Suit Where You Work? | Big Think

Does Your Political Style Suit Where You Work? | Big Think | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
There’s no way to live in this world and avoid politics.  It’s in our homes, schools, workplaces and just about anywhere else we turn.  While there’s no shortage of people who claim to hate politics, escaping it is nearly impossible.  Thus the important question is: which types of politics are you  ...
Lauren Nichols's insight:

Some don't realize what a large administrative component there is in health care and especially in the hospitals.  One of my friends came to visit my office in one of our hospitals and amazed to see the behind the scenes operations. So many offices and yes, office politics. In health care I think we have multiple subcultures of politics . We have clinical, non-clinical, site, network and where they all collide.  What strikes me as different from some other organizations is that rather than making widgets, we care for patients — serve sick and vulnerable people. Politics sometimes cause us to lose site of that service.

 

Politics seems to be about getting what you want-being right, gaining power, job security, favors, promotion etc-self-serving motivations.  I guess there is nothing wrong with wanting to excel and move up but maybe it is the motivation that makes the difference.  Moving up to learn and contribute to the goals of the organization in different ways or moving up for the sake of more money,  prestige, power with little contribution to moving the organization in a positive direction.

 

 Politics slow us down-reducing our ability to work efficiently, effectively and impeding our ability to innovate. This political culture is created and sustained through a lack of accountability-what you allow is what you teach. Sometimes the only accountability is around getting people back in line with the politics vs. accountability and responsibility to do your work, the right thing for patients and our associates.

 

Are there health care workers out there who truly want to serve the patients and families but are forced to play politics because the culture demands it?  What style are they? Purists or maybe a team of purists? If we can't eradicate politics from health care, how can we minimize its impact on patient care and morale? 


 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Yale Scientific Magazine – Post-Hospital Syndrome: The Revolving Door of Hospital Readmissions

Yale Scientific Magazine – Post-Hospital Syndrome: The Revolving Door of Hospital Readmissions | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Patient Experience vs. Patient Engagement | Better Patient Engagement

Patient Experience vs. Patient Engagement | Better Patient Engagement | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Lauren Nichols's insight:

We have not been hearing as much about engagement as we have experience but it seems that engagment will be necessary to the success of the future state of health care.  How do we influence our patients to engage? I think there are a number of ways and one is through our relationships with them.  I think too often we underestimate the importance of relationships and how we connect with our patients as human beings not widgets, with compassion and support not judgement.  And as for associate engagement...ditto.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Stanford Hospital Uses Telemedicine: Steps to the Future of Hospitals

Stanford Hospital Uses Telemedicine: Steps to the Future of Hospitals | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Video consultation with doctors is becoming a routine part of the care offered by the Stanford Hospital & Clinics. The technology behind it is not a real innovation, it was already introduced o...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Bullied Into Cheating?

Bullied Into Cheating? | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
It seems, cheating is a major problem at work. According to some recent statistics, 57% of men and 54% of women admit to cheating. A whopping 36% of men and women admit to having an affair with a co
Lauren Nichols's insight:

I guess the question is- how do we get better at getting "buy in"  and really help frontline staff understand the data and the importance of improvement to the care of the patient without demoralizing staff. We are essentially telling caregivers who beleive they are providing great care that "we" don't think they are providing great care so we need them to prove it through audits. This is the case with much of the frontline audit data that nurses and others are asked to capture.  I think we can do a better job of this by increasing transparency,  using appreciative inquiry to get staff to help solve problems and help them understand it isn't about what they are doing wrong but about how they can have a huge impact on taking care to the next level. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Never Events Never Again - Luckett&Farley

Never Events Never Again - Luckett&Farley | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
When a person goes to receive medical care, they typically enter with a level of anxiety. One thing that’s usually not on their mind at the time is, “Will I become a victim to a patient fall or trauma?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

Corporate wellness programs fail both companies and patients

Corporate wellness programs fail both companies and patients | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
This column was published in USA Today on September 9, 2013. More patients are coming to my primary care clinic with forms from their employer, asking me to measure their blood pressure, or…
Lauren Nichols's insight:

Does your organizaiton have a wellness program? If so, have the results been positive? It seems that our organization is on the road to a Wellness program but I wonder if it is as much about the health of our assoicates and their families as it is about shifting costs for healthcare. I run into people frequently who assume that becuase I work for a hosptial system, that I have all the healthcare I want and that I can just walk in and ask for whatever I want...MRI, CT, Meds etc. In fact is is difficult to get an appointment with primary care when you are actually sick or physical therapy and specialist especially those who are pediatric specific. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

The Hard Work of Acting Upon Your Values—7 Steps to Enhance Motivation and Well-Being

The Hard Work of Acting Upon Your Values—7 Steps to Enhance Motivation and Well-Being | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Last week, one of my executive coaching clients was noticeably frustrated. His firm had just released a new product that his company leaders believe has the potential to become a real game changer.…
Lauren Nichols's insight:

I've added this to my healthcare topic because it so cloesly relates to what is going on in many hospitals...a mega number of intiatives, not to mention changing the way we do business, all the while trying to keep a sustainable organization...a lot of staff are feeling "fried" maybe a little on the crispy burnt out side and many of the changes have them questioning whether the organization's actions are in alginment with their espoused values and therefore disconnected from meaning in thier work. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Nichols
Scoop.it!

7 Traits of True Leaders

7 Traits of True Leaders | Fly on the Wall: Healthcare from the inside out | Scoop.it
Control is a mirage. The most effective leaders right now--men and women--are those who embrace traits once considered feminine: Empathy. Vulnerability. Humility. Inclusiveness. Generosity. Balance. Patience.
Lauren Nichols's insight:

I scooped this to my Healthcare topic because I think changing leadership in healthcare is an extremely important aspect of the overhaul of the whole system. 

more...
No comment yet.