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Flipped High School -- The Students' Perspective

Clintondale High School has flipped their high school. Not a class. Their school. Lectures are being delivered at home. Homework and projects are being done ...
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After wanting to explore how students view flipped classrooms, I found this video that explains how some students feel about the flipped classroom. These students talk about how their parents enjoy watching the lectures with them and knowing that their student can learn on their own at home because some of these parents do not understand what their own child is learning. I think this is a very beneficial factor to flipping the classrooms in higher levels of education, because it allows the students of low educational families to surpass their parent’s knowledge and give themselves a better future.

 

Students like the personalization and ability to ask questions. “When the teacher is giving a lecture in the classroom, you can’t just stop and ask can you repeat this part. It’s like let me just finish my lecture and I’ll come to you separately. With doing the homework in class, the teacher comes to each student and helps them individually.” In a traditional lecture, the teacher needs to focus on the needs of the entire class and not just the individual, so they do not always have time to answer questions. The students continued by saying, “A lot more people actually do their work this year. I have seen a lot of people change a lot, by actually sitting down and understanding it and saying they’ve been watching the videos, which helps them.” I really like the fact that these students are making the most of this flipped classroom and really taking advantage of the resources given to them at home and school. I think it is very interesting that these students are changing their learning ways for the better because of this flip. If I was an educator at that school, then I would want to show off how these children have improved and desire for other schools to do the same.

They were even asked would they keep it even if scores just stayed the same or even went down. The responded by saying they wanted to keep it because it is fun and everyone’s feedback on it is good. This is in contrast to the video that was from the perspective of the teachers that said that students dislike the flipped classroom because it makes them feel like they are learning on their own. This makes sense that there is a discrepancy because this is a controversial method of teaching and if all students loved it then it would make it easier to make all schools follow it. I do not know if there will ever be a conclusive decision on if flipped classrooms are or are not the best way to teach. Hearing that these students enjoyed the flip and were getting a lot out of it, really encourages me and persuades me to think that flipping the classroom could be the right way to go with the right teacher, right age level, and right class. These restrictions apply because if the teacher is not for the switch then the students are not going to like it, or get things out of it because the teacher is not putting all her effort into make the switch the best thing possible. If the age level is too young, the students will probably not be able to sit and learn from a lecture at home because they need the basics and a lot of attention to learn in the beginning. And if the class is not a class that can have lectures outside and work during the class period than the flipping would do no good. 

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Bill Nye thinks 'flipped classrooms' are the future

Bill Nye thinks 'flipped classrooms' are the future | Flippped Classroom | Scoop.it
Bill Nye the Science Guy knows a bit about getting students excited about learning, and he is lending some of that expertise to teachers in Minnesota and around the country to help them engage students in and outside the classroom.
Molly Carlson's insight:

Bill Nye the Science Guy is interviewed on USA today about flipped classrooms. Bill Nye is in favor of this flip and throughout the video he explains why. One of his main reasons for the flip is that, “I think this kind of learning is more fun. This way when you are in the classroom with the teacher you are interacting with him or her directly rather than having to sit back while he or she talks.” I find this interesting because up until college and even in college, I have had traditional classrooms and have still always been able to interact with the teacher and ask questions to further my understanding. It is interesting to step back and see what this looks like in a further out perspectives. One of the most convincing things that Bill said in this interview is that, “Ideally the student would put in the same amount of time but get more out of it.” As a future teacher I want my students to be able to learn the material in a in-depth and understandable way, but not have to spend hours and hours to accomplish that. As I continue to research flipped classrooms, I want to see and understand how effective they are at cutting the learning time needed and if they actually help students get more out of the class. 

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Harvey Mudd professors' research suggests 'flipped' classes might not be worth the hassle

Harvey Mudd professors' research suggests 'flipped' classes might not be worth the hassle | Flippped Classroom | Scoop.it
The concept of the
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Harvey Mudd College received a large grant to research the effectiveness of flipped classroom. During the 2012-2013 academic school year, two professors flipped one of their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) classes while leaving the other one in the traditional manner. In this study the professors specifically looked for “student’s ability to transfer their knowledge to a problem, their attitudes toward learning and whether they could demonstrate their learning on exams.” The results of this test showed that the students and teachers felt that the flipped classroom involved a heavier workload because of the students having to watch and the teacher having to make the videos for the class. One of the professors said, “‘(The professors’) lives might be easier and their students might be happier of they just do a traditional class.’” This is in direct contrast to the beliefs that flipped classrooms allow students to be more interesting and perform better. As this research continues, the researchers urge teachers and people in general to take a better look at flipped classrooms and the classes that are being offer. This is because some classes may be easier to do that than others and if a teacher is not particularly talented in lecturing then this extra time and personalization can become a huge struggle.

This whole subject of flipped classrooms is completely new to me and this is the first time that I am hearing a negative side to this new classroom model. It makes a lot of sense to me that there would be struggles in flipping a variety of subjects, especially because some require such specific knowledge on the material so enabling students to learn that information on their own and in a creative way can prove to be a struggle for both the teachers and students. I also think it is interesting that these college students find this class harder and want to go back to the original traditional classroom, one in which most students have generally hated the environment of. This is a perspective that I have considered in my head before but not through an academic way. I want to keep exploring to see what the benefits and the disadvantages of a flipped classroom are while still gaining a larger knowledge of what this is. 

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eli7081.pdf

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This is a very informative article on flipped classrooms. It begins with a scenario which lays out a typical classroom experience for a student in a flipped classroom. This scenario features a boy in a designing food gardens class and how he watches lectures before class and then comes in prepared on work on the group project during class, which is benefitted from the lecture time. This article points out seven things people should know about flipped classrooms. These included defining what it is, how it works, who is doing it, the significance of the flip, the downsides of the flip, where it is going, and the implications for teaching and learning. Each part is very clear, easy to understand and informative. I did not realize there are many different models for the flipped classroom, I just thought the basic flip was the same no matter what, so reading the how does it work section was very helpful to me. It defines a flipped classroom as “term is widely used to describe almost any class structure that provides prerecorded lectures followed by in-class exercise.” I think this is a very clear definition in which I can see where the uniqueness and differences can come into play. I also learned a lot from the where is it going section. “As the flipped classroom becomes more popular, new tools may emerge to support the out of class portion of the curriculum.” I find this very important because if this new model for the classroom is going to stay and become more apparent in schools, then the future needs to be planned for in advance because the education of a child is very important and lack of preparation can waste valuable time. In the who is doing it section, there are three different examples of how colleges have used flipped classrooms and they have worked well. I want to see if this model only works for the classes they specifically talked about (video production, accounting, and physics) or if all classes will successfully be flipped. 

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Flip Pros and Cons from Instructors View

What are the benefits and detriments of the Flipped Classroom Model from the point of view of the instructor?
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This is a youtube video about the pros and cons about the flipped classroom from the point of view from the teacher. Some of the positives are that teachers gain valuable classroom time.  “Now time to interact with students as they are doing, not just listening, doing the material.” The students should be coming to class prepared from learning online and they should be ready for the day. Another positive that goes along with that is “you also gain better questions from the students; this allows the students to dive deeper into the material.” Normally when students are learning in the traditional model, they are still trying to understand at a basic level, but once they come in knowing the material and are able to interact and learn in the classroom, they can ask questions and deepen their understanding. The last positive mentioned was that it allows more group work and it also “allows for more consistency in the material because they are all seeing the same material before the class.” Now that the teacher does not have to lecture in class, the students can do group projects and learn together during class. I really like the idea that there is consistency in the classroom. Many teachers teach a variety of subjects and when something is missed in one of the classes, it can be very frustrating to the student. This way all the material is learned by everyone and even if a student is out one day they can still know exactly what they are supposed to know.

 

There are also downsides. The first one is that the work is front loaded. You are already doing lesson planning, but now you also have to find the resources to post online. This takes a lot of time from the teacher and there is no break during class time to make up for this work done beforehand because all the activities need to be planned out too. As a future teacher is makes me a little nervous because there are already so many things that need to be planned out and taken care of outside of the school hours, so to devote more time into making this the best flipped classroom ever will be very difficult. Another downside is that, “The students do not love it” and “the students complain that the students are teaching themselves.” I know that I personally hated the feeling of teaching myself, so this makes me very skeptical of putting my future students in this situation. I would love to see how exactly the students feel and if there is a possibility of changing something in order to make the students actually like this model of education.

 

A flipped classroom and basically anything that has to do with a class is a weighing of the pros and cons, and right now I do not know exactly how I feel about this model and if I actually want to use it because I want the best for my students and if my students do not learn in it or enjoy being a part of it then in my mind it is not worth it. 

 

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WHAT is the Flipped Classroom? | Center for Teaching and Learning

WHAT is the Flipped Classroom? | Center for Teaching and Learning | Flippped Classroom | Scoop.it
Molly Carlson's insight:

The University of Texas at Austin provided this link which has a video and a chart that compares regular and flipped classrooms. These areas of information are in the areas of before, beginning, during, and after class as well as office hours.  Both of these resources are strictly informative and do not attempt to persuade the audience that one side is better than another. I think this is very important that there are these resources to allow the public to be informed on a new and fairly trendy topic in education. This is also a great resource to show the different role of the teacher in these two different classroom models. One big difference in the flipped and traditional classrooms comes in what the teacher does to prepare for class. The chart on the page states that at the beginning of class in the traditional model, “Instructor makes general assumption about what is helpful” as compared to the flipped model which says, “Instructor can anticipate where students need the most help.” It is interesting for me to think about students actually learning from a lecture online beforehand and not having to teacher for the first time in class but rather I would be helping students reach a deeper understanding through learning personalized for them. As a future teacher who is just beginning to understand what a flipped classroom is, I find it very informative and interesting to see what my roles in the classroom could be and start to form my own opinion on if I want my classroom to be more traditional or to flip it. 

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In 'Flipped' Classrooms, a Method for Mastery

In 'Flipped' Classrooms, a Method for Mastery | Flippped Classroom | Scoop.it
A system that reverses the lecture-homework routine makes it possible for students to learn subjects thoroughly at their own pace.
Molly Carlson's insight:

The main point of this article is that: “the flipped classroom eliminated whole-class lecture, so students don’t need to work at a uniform pace.” This article focuses on a new topic of a flipped classroom with an emphasis on mastering. This means that students learn the material, but can move on to different material only once they have mastered the prior material. It is still a flipped classroom, which allows the teachers and students to have one on one attention to meet their learning needs individually. “Some teachers offer students a menu of learning activities to choose from, and another menu of ways to demonstrate mastery – that way, a student who does not test well, for example, could still show understanding.” I think this is a really cool idea of allowing students to show that they now the material in a unique way because everyone learns differently. I personally do not do well with public speaking, so if I could do a different type of project that did not include that weakness than I would enjoy learning more and feel like I am excelling. I would still need to find out how this would work for grading because if each child is doing a different type of project, how would that affect the grades or still be seen as equal work by the school.

Because of this personalization of work and lack of large lectures, the student and teacher have a lot of face to face communication. “In this mastery version of the flipped classroom, there is little to no papers the teachers have to grade at home. “After the student takes the test or turns in a project designed to demonstrate mastery, the teacher sits with the student and goes over the work, providing immediate feedback.” I think this is a great idea that the students can actually learn right away from the material they just were tested on. This way the material is still fresh in their minds and the teacher is able to see exactly where the student may need some extra help on before they are complete masters of the subject.

One teacher uses his flipped mastery class like a video game where you must master the material to level up. This allows students to move on to the next material only when they know the prior material. I really like this explanation and way of teaching in the classroom. This allows students time to learn and not be forced into the next subject area when they are not ready. “But teachers who use flipped mastery claim that its efficiency allows most students to do a year’s work in much less time. They build in extra units for advanced studies or work with them on independent projects.” Yes, some students may not be able to cover the whole years’ worth of material in that time frame, but at least they will be masters at a lot of it, instead of knowing nothing and just be failing which would be impacting their learning in the future.

All in all, I think this idea of mastering in a flipped classroom is a unique idea and brings up some really cool methods for the classroom teacher. I would love to see some examples of how this actually works in the classroom so that can add some clarity to the information I know about it know.

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Livescribe Education :: The Flipped Classroom Infographic

Livescribe Education :: The Flipped Classroom Infographic | Flippped Classroom | Scoop.it
Livescribe paper-based computing platform includes a smartpen, dot paper and software applications that changes the way people capture, use and share audio and visual information with pen and paper.
Molly Carlson's insight:

This is an infographic on flipped classrooms with a lot of information on how it was started, examples of the successes in schools, how it works, and so much more. For someone who does not know much about the flipped classroom, this infographic is very useful and easy to understand. I am very pro teaching students in a way that they learn best and not just a cookie cutter method. I think it is interesting that the students would watch and learn material at home first and then at school they get a deeper more personal understanding of it. For me, I liked when a teacher explained it and I could ask questions right away instead of being confused trying to learn on my own, so this makes me interested to see how this actually works for students with different learning methods. This infographic lists compares before the flip “50% of freshman failed English. 44% of freshman failed math” and after the flip “19% of freshman failed English. 13% of freshman failed math.” This makes me interested to see if all schools have this improvement or if it is only for this number of students polled. I think flipped classrooms could be a wonderful idea, but I am still skeptical on how it would actually work in a living classroom with a variety of different students and subjects that are not that moldable.  

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