Active learning in Higher Education
5.2K views | +1 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
onto Active learning in Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Should You Flip Your Classroom?

Should You Flip Your Classroom? | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Ramsey Musallam (@ramusallam on Twitter) is a high school chem teacher in San Francisco and teaches in the Masters of Ed. program at the University of San Francisco. He blogs at FlipTeaching.com

 

On this note, I would like to share a personal story that I feel provides a metaphor for why the flipped classroom is a technique that works well for me. On May 25th of this year I underwent a fairly complicated open-heart surgery to correct an aneurysm of my thoracic aorta that was found randomly at a routine check up. The surgery went well, and five months later, minus a long scar down the center of my chest, I rarely think of the physical struggle that was the summer of 2011.

 

Throughout the process, I was very impressed with the confidence and knowledge my thoracic surgeon embodied. Then one day, it hit me: My surgeon had a teacher! He learned to how to perform my surgery in school! An instructor taught him how to do something, something very, very important, in a very effective way! As a teacher myself, I have a hunch my surgeon didn't learn how to repair my aorta by passively taking in information through a textbook or lecture. Rather, I'm certain his confidence and skill was cultivated through hours of inquiry, trial and error, with strong mentors by his side the whole way. In short, I'm sure he learned by doing, not observing.

We must strive to be facilitators, mentors and guides for our students, as if what we are preparing them for, much like my surgeon, will one day change lives. Any teaching methodology that amplifies this role is a step in the right direction.

 

Are you using various elements of flipped instruction in your practice? If so, how are you using it to foster student inquiry?

more...
No comment yet.
Active learning in Higher Education
Strategies for more effective student-centred, authentic engagement in the higher education context
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Education Is Performance Art

Education Is Performance Art | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

One half of the entertainment duo Penn & Teller explains how performance and discomfort make education come alive.

Education, at its most engaging, is performance art. From the moment a teacher steps into the classroom, students look to him or her to set the tone and course of study for everyone, from the most enthusiastic to the most apathetic students. Even teachers who have moved away from the traditional lecture format, toward more learner autonomy-supportive approaches such as project-based and peer-to-peer learning, still need to engage students in the process, and serve as a vital conduit between learner and subject matter.

Teachers are seldom trained in the performance aspect of teaching, however, and given that every American classroom contains at least one bored, reluctant, or frustrated student, engagement through performance may just be the most important skill in a teacher’s bag of tricks.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Flipping Large Classes: Three Strategies to Engage Students

Flipping Large Classes: Three Strategies to Engage Students | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

As we continue our ongoing series focused on the flipped classroom in higher education, it’s time to tackle another frequently asked question: “How can I flip a large class?”

I like this question because it’s not asking whether you can flip a large class, but rather what’s the best way to do it. Faculty who teach large classes are challenged not only by the sheer number of students but also by the physical space in the classroom. Having 100, 200, or 400+ students in class means teaching in large lecture halls with stadium seating and seats that are bolted to the floor. It’s not exactly the ideal space for collaboration and group discussions, so the types of flipped and active learning strategies you can use are more limited.

Often, faculty fall back on the “think, pair, share” format or use clicker questions to encourage student engagement. But there are other techniques we can deploy in these large classrooms to engage students and involve them in higher levels of critical thinking and analysis.

To start the conversation, here are three strategies that work well in large lecture halls because they don’t require students to sit in groups or move around the room. Each of these strategies provides a framework for generating discussion, which increases engagement and encourages students to analyze a variety of perspectives. And if you aren’t teaching to the masses, these strategies can be easily modified for any class size.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Stanford Debuts Online Communication Course for Teachers -- Campus Technology

Stanford Debuts Online Communication Course for Teachers -- Campus Technology | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Stanford University's Graduate School of Education has launched a new online course, Effective Conversation in the Classroom, designed to help educators learn to create rich and meaningful conversations in their classrooms.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Five Time-Saving Strategies for the Flipped Classroom

Five Time-Saving Strategies for the Flipped Classroom | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A few months ago, I heard a podcast by Michael Hyatt, a best-selling author and speaker who helps clients excel in their personal and professional lives. This particular podcast focused on how to “create margins” in life to reduce stress and avoid burnout. Quoting Dr. Richard Swenson’s work, Hyatt defines a margin as “the space between our load and our limits. It is the amount allowed beyond that which is needed. . . . Margin is the gap between rest and exhaustion. . . . Margin is the opposite of overload.”

As I listened to this podcast, I realized that the idea of creating margins also applies to the flipped classroom. I often hear comments like “The flipped classroom takes too much time,” “I don’t have time to devise so many new teaching strategies,” “It takes too much time to record and edit videos,” “I don’t have time to cover everything on the syllabus,” or “I don’t have time to redesign all of my courses.” I also hear “I tried to flip my class, but it was exhausting; so I quit.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century

8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
We tend to think of project-based learning as focused on research, planning problem-solving, authenticity, and inquiry. Further, collaboration, resourcefulness, and networking matter too–dozens of characteristics “fit” into project-based learning. Its popularity comes from, among other characteristics, its general flexibility as a curriculum framework. You can do, teach, assess, and connect almost anything within the context of a well-designed project.

But what if we had to settle on a handful (or two) of itemized characteristics for modern, connected, possibly place-based, and often digital project-based learning? Well, then the following might be useful.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Report: Using Technology to Support At-Risk Students’ Learning

Report: Using Technology to Support At-Risk Students’ Learning | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Research shows that when technology is used as a tool for interactive, teacher-guided learning -- rather than drill-and-kill -- learning is enhanced, especially for at-risk students. This is the finding of Using Technology to Support At-Risk Students’ Learning, a 2014 report from Stanford SCOPE and the Alliance for Excellent Education.

Read the report to learn about the latest research on educational technology, from flipped classroom to blended learning, with tips on how you can use tech in your classroom to enhance learning.

Research Cited: Darling-Hammond, L., Zielezinski, M. B., & Goldman, S. (2014). Using Technology to Support At-Risk Students’ Learning. Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE) and Alliance for Excellent Education.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

The Power of Curiosity

The Power of Curiosity | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Research shows when people are curious about something, not only do they learn better, they learn more. It should come as no surprise, then, that inquiry-based learning is proving to be an effective education model. Inquiry-based learning occurs when students discover and construct information with the teacher’s guidance. It is a learner-centered model that arouses students’ curiosity and motivates them to seek their own answers. Increasingly, technology is the foundation of an effective inquiry-based lesson. Download this Center for Digital Education paper to learn more about inquiry-based learning and how you can support this model in your classrooms. The paper also offers sample lesson plans that draw upon inquiry-based strategies with the integration of technology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

How to Design the Perfect Modern Learning Assessment

How to Design the Perfect Modern Learning Assessment | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
In this article, we draw on the wisdom of Evolving Educator's Vanessa Bianchi in determining how to design the "perfect" modern learning assessment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Why implementation of Social learning is important for the current education system?

Why implementation of Social learning is important for the current education system? | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, but the trend of learners educating themselves is on a continuous upward movement. The reasons may include freedom to choose, no fear of questions being asked, learning at one's own pace and place, absorbing at one's own capacity and much more. The self-learning trend has been empowered by cutting edge educational technology innovation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

French Billionaire Opens Tuition-Free School in Silicon Valley

French Billionaire Opens Tuition-Free School in Silicon Valley | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
With the 42 model, based on peer-to-peer learning, students at the 200,000-square-foot Fremont campus, pay no tuition, come and go freely day and night and have neither teachers nor lectures. They’re assigned to programming projects for some of the school’s research partners, and are able to use more than 1,000 top-of-the-line iMac computers connected to high-speed broadband networks and large-capacity storage servers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

You are a global educator. It’s time to start thinking like one

You are a global educator. It’s time to start thinking like one | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Building collaboration skills today means building global collaboration skills. Educators have their work cut out for them
Ed note: Innovation in Action is a monthly column from the International Society of Technology in Education focused on exemplary practices in education.

It’s one thing for today’s students to connect with the world and to appreciate the diversity and significance of potential interactions through everyday, real-time interaction. It is a whole different challenge to be able to collaborate with learning partners across town — or around the world.

The latter, in truth, is what all educators and learners should be aspiring toward, but the reality is you cannot run before you can walk. Unless educators understand and experience the power of using digital technologies for online collaboration in a local context first, it is likely that jumping head-first into global contexts — with its myriad challenges — will not be successful.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

The End of School — Life Learning — Medium

The End of School - Life Learning - Medium
Most discussions on the future of school focus on education reform. Authors and policy analysts ask questions like, how can we change existing institutions to improve on their outcomes? We get discussions like those around federally subsidized student loans, funding for schools, school vouchers, the viability of charter schools, and what ought to be included in exam standards for coming years.
These questions, while valuable, miss the broader point of education and the marketplace today. We sit at a pivotal moment in the history of schooling and education. Thanks to a number of market forces, primarily led by leaps in technology and its relation to education costs, it is finally possible to realistically remove education from school (as we know it) for the population at large.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Is a deschooled society likely even though its totally possible?  I suspect the gaps in the implementation plan discussed here relate to other social constraints and controls that dictate the function of schools...  they serve to contain and restrict the free movement of minors during the working day... and as we seem not to trust children, or society that's a big next step...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Congratulations to our 2016 Awards Winners! - Knowledge Commercialisation Australasia Inc

Congratulations to our 2016 Awards Winners! - Knowledge Commercialisation Australasia Inc | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Best Creative Engagement Strategy

(Mr Rohan McDougall, Curtin University (left), Dr Alastair Hick, KCA (right))

Cisco Internet of Everything Innovation Centre – Curtin University
The Cisco Internet of Everything Innovation Centre, co-founded by Cisco, Curtin University and Woodside Energy Ltd, is a new industry and research collaboration centre designed to foster co-innovation. With a foundation in radioastronomy, supercomputing and software expertise, it is growing a state-of-the-art connected community focused on leveraging data analytics, cybersecurity and digital transformation network platforms to solve industry problems. The Centre combines start-ups, small–medium enterprises, industry experts, developers and researchers in a collaborative open environment to encourage experimentation, innovation and development through brainstorming, workshops, proof-of-concept and rapid prototyping. By accelerating innovation in next-generation technologies, it aims to help Australian businesses thrive in this age of digital disruption.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Preparing Students for a Project-Based World

Preparing Students for a Project-Based World | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

In the paper, Preparing Students for a Project-Based World, released jointly by Getting Smart and Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we explore equity, economic realities, student engagement and instructional and school design in the preparation of all students for college, career and citizenship.

Featuring blogs, podcasts and videos with students, teachers and leaders in the United States and internationally, as well as insights from people in the business community, this publication makes the case for high-quality project-based learning (PBL) as a way to optimally prepare students for the project-based world they are inheriting by exploring:

The New Economy: Project-based learning prepares students for a competitive, project-based and global economy.
- Equity: Preparing students for a project-based economy a social justice issue.
- Myths and Misconceptions: Myths about the implementation of high-quality project-based learning.
- Recommendations: A project-based economy has implications for students, teachers and leaders. We shine a light on best practices and models to prepare students for college, career and citizenship and illuminate the path forward.

We have also released a quick start guide for students that gives tools and best practices for project-based learning at school and outside of it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Stories, Scenarios and Micro eLearning: Incorporating Play Into Learning Design

Stories, Scenarios and Micro eLearning: Incorporating Play Into Learning Design | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A belief among a number of adults appear to be about play being frivolous, something extra, an add-on or something that’s nice to do when we have the time.  Furthermore, play is viewed as just a childish inclination which shouldn’t be around anymore. They believe play is different from and shouldn’t mix with more serious matters like work and learning. However such perspective, which defines play as an activity, is really a misconception.

Play is natural especially to human beings who are the biggest players of all, according to psychiatrist Stuart Brown, M.D. It’s a biological process that evolved to help animals - including humans - survive. Brown, who has studied more than 6,000 “play histories” (case studies), concludes that “play is part of our evolutionary history.” He defines play as a state of mind rather than an activity and believes we have a “drive to play and we are built to play.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Research Shows Students Learn Better When They Figure Things Out On Their Own

Research Shows Students Learn Better When They Figure Things Out On Their Own | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
In some instances, research illuminates a topic and changes our existing beliefs. For example, here’s a post that challenges the myth of preferred learning styles. Other times, you might hear about a study and say, “Well, of course that’s true!” This might be one of those moments.
Last year, Dr. Karlsson Wirebring and fellow researchers published a study that supports what many educators and parents have already suspected: students learn better when they figure things out on their own, as compared to being told what to do.  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Learner Agency, Technology, and Emotional Intelligence

Learner Agency, Technology, and Emotional Intelligence | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
What is learner agency?

Learner agency is “the capability of individual human beings to make choices and act on these choices in a way that makes a difference in their lives” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structure_and_agency).   As related to the needs as identified by Glasser, elements of freedom, choosing how we want to live our lives, and power, choosing what and how to learn, address learner agency.

The notion of agency as contributing to cognitive processes involved in learning comes primarily from the Piagetian notion of constructivism where knowledge is seen as “constructed” through a process of taking actions in one’s environment and making adjustments to existing knowledge structures based on the outcome of those actions. The implication is that the most transformative learning experiences will be those that are directed by the learner’s own endeavors and curiosities. (Lindgren & McDaniel, 2012)

Schwartz and Okita developed the following table to compare and contrast high versus low agency learning environments.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Collaborative Learning in the classroom

Collaborative Learning in the classroom | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

In the summer of 1995, Larry Page, then 22, visited Stanford as a prospective PhD student in computer science. His tour guide was Sergey Brin, a 21-year-old mathematical whiz who was already pursuing his PhD in that department.
Page elected to attend Stanford, and by 1996 he and Brin were good friends who were collaborating on a project called “Backrub,” which investigated how sites linked back to other webpages.

Groups tend to learn through “discussion, clarification of ideas, and evaluation of other’s ideas.” Perhaps information that is discussed is retained in long term memory 


Many consider Vygotsky the father of “social learning”. Vygotsky was an education rebel in many ways. Vygotsky controversially argued for educators to assess students’ ability to solve problems, rather than knowledge acquisition. It considers what a student can do if aided by peers and adults. By considering this model for learning, we might consider collaboration to increase students’ awareness of other concepts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

The Active Learning Continuum

The Active Learning Continuum | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Ninety-one percent of respondents to a recent CDE survey agreed active learning better prepares students for college and careers than traditional education frameworks. So why is it that it’s more common to see rows of desks facing the front of the room instead of workspaces designed for collaboration and exploration in today’s classrooms? Unfortunately, students can often lack the communication, critical-thinking and problem-solving skills they will need in their careers when they graduate. This paper helps school districts change that outcome. It discusses the benefits and challenges of active learning and offers real-life examples and strategies to help districts make their learning environments more engaging and collaborative.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

What’s Next? Personalized, Project-Based Learning

What’s Next? Personalized, Project-Based Learning | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

 Project-based learning is a great way to engage students, to encourage collaboration and creativity, and to promote authentic work and assessment. But it’s hard to:

-set a high bar for high quality project deliverables;
- assess projects objectively especially when they’re all different;
- help students with low level skills engage in challenging projects;
- mitigate the free rider problem of loafing team members;
- provide enough but not too much formative feedback and support; and
- avoid big knowledge gaps resulting from a string of projects.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Hands-Off Teaching Cultivates Metacognition

Hands-Off Teaching Cultivates Metacognition | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
As a teacher, you put a lot of thought into how to make your class and the material as accessible and engaging as possible. You think about what you know, and how you first learned it. You think about what your students already know, and how to use that knowledge as the foundation for what you're about to teach. And, as if that's not enough, you think about how to make your content so engaging that no matter what else is happening (lunch next period, upcoming prom, or the latest social media scandal among the sophomores), your lesson will hold your students' attention. All that thought goes into a lesson, and still there are students spacing out during class or seeming to fall behind. Working so hard and still not reaching every student can be frustrating. And you have no one to blame but yourself -- you're hogging all the best learning in your classroom.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Are busy people superior learners?

Are busy people superior learners? | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
New research has found that adults with a busy daily lifestyle tend to do better on tests of cognitive function than their less busy counterparts.

Indeed, people who report greater levels of busyness tend to have superior cognition, especially concerning memory for recently learned information, said Sara Festini, a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Vital Longevity of the University of Texas, and lead author of the study.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Teach creativity, don’t measure it: school leader

Teach creativity, don’t measure it: school leader | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

ATAR was a prime example of a measurement that inhibits creativity, Melville-Jones said. She argued that schools should scrap it altogether and illustrated her point from her own personal experience. 


“I had a wonderfully compliant academic son who lapped up everything the [NSW] Higher School Certificate had to offer, [who] is still studying at the age of 25, whom the ATAR suited perfectly,” Melville-Jones told Education Review. “I also have another son who is incredibly abstract and creative, who struggled so hard through the HSC and came out the other end disillusioned and flat and restricted and confined. That saddens me. 


“I don’t believe the ATAR is everything. I believe the ATAR is very restricting, and stops students from being able to explore their own possibilities to become confident,” she said. “People come out of the HSC anxious, and we need to build confidence in those senior years and not do it after they leave school.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Personalize Learning: Continuum of Motivation: Moving from Extrinsic to Intrinsic

Personalize Learning: Continuum of Motivation: Moving from Extrinsic to Intrinsic | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The Continuum of Motivation does involve learner voice, choice, and engagement. All of the continuums have elements that drive the learner to build agency. This continuum and the other continuums moving to agency will be featured in our new book, How to Personalize Learning, to be released Fall 2016. All the continuums will include additional references and research that support how the continuums support learners, personalized learning and moving to agency. 
more...
No comment yet.