Active learning in Higher Education
6.7K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
onto Active learning in Higher Education
Scoop.it!

Connected Learning

Connected Learning | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Learn more about the research and vision behind this new approach to learning, and hear from others who are already practicing connected learning.

 

Connected learning is when you’re pursuing knowledge and expertise around something you care deeply about, and you’re supported by friends and institutions who share and recognize this common passion or purpose.

more...
No comment yet.
Active learning in Higher Education
Strategies for more effective student-centred, authentic engagement in the higher education context
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

How To Learn Anything In 20 Hours

How To Learn Anything In 20 Hours | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it


If you put 20 hours of focused deliberate practice into that thing, you will be astounded. Astounded at how good you are.

In this TedX Talk, Josh Kaufman asks his audience, “How long does it take from starting something and being grossly incompetent and knowing it to being reasonably good?”

“In hopefully, as short a period of time as possible. So, how long does that take? Here's what my research says: 20 hours. That's it. You can go from knowing nothing about any skill that you can think of. Want to learn a language? Want to learn how to draw? Want to learn how to juggle flaming chainsaws?”

Kim Flintoff's insight:
If you put 20 hours of focused deliberate practice into that thing, you will be astounded. Astounded at how good you are.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

School Should Be Impractical (The Practical Benefits of Being Impractical)

School Should Be Impractical (The Practical Benefits of Being Impractical) | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Schools are designed to be practical but this has a hidden drawback. Innovation is often impractical because it’s unpredictable. So, what if the push toward “practical skills” in school is actually making learning impractical? And what if impractical ideas and skills we ignore are actually what students will use later in life?
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Part of the reason I switched from offering "workshops" to PLAYSHOPS about 20 years ago... 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Project Based Learning is a Roller Coaster

Project Based Learning is a Roller Coaster | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
One of the most challenging aspects of this school year has been using project-based learning to integrate curriculum. Projects are a beast! It feels like I am boarding a roller coaster each time we begin a new project. In fact, it feels like every project follows the same emotionally turbulent trajectory as pictured below.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Supporting self-directed learning in the classroom | NEO BLOG

Supporting self-directed learning in the classroom | NEO BLOG | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
“Self-directed learning” is a major catch-phrase of 21st Century educationalists, and undeniably a critical skill in the labor markets of the future. The modern world of work demands that people have demonstrable abilities to self-manage: their time and their inputs. Employees that can be tasked to solve a problem without micro-management, and can be relied upon to use their resources responsibly and sparingly, are highly prized.

On the flip-side, the freedom to meet targets and objectives in “your own way” is also much appreciated by employees. When organisations set objectives, rather than tasks, employees feel a sense of ownership and freedom that contrasts with the rote task completion of employment in by-gone days. By dictating the end-goal, rather than the process, organisations empower teams to deliver projects in more creative and effective ways.

Then there’s the “gig economy” – 34% of America’s workforce already self-identify as freelancers. Vast trenches of educated professionals are pursuing bona fide, and profitable careers shopping their specialist skills on the global, highly competitive freelance market. Whether they learned it at school or not – these individuals are required to have massive amounts of daily drive, discipline and time management. In short: their entire work-life is self-directed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Developing fascination (and curriculum) with Matthew Patterson

Developing fascination (and curriculum) with Matthew Patterson | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

“When you’re just pretending and reading Madame Bovary because everyone else reads it . . . Who cares! That’s SO boring. Ooh, and now we’re reading Hamlet. And this is the place where we get to talk about Polonius. Stale. It’s absolutely stale. And no real learning will take place in an environment like that.”

These are just a few of the thoughts Matthew Patterson, winner of last year’s TNTP Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice, offered to us on how he selects literature in his classroom. We recently had a chance to chat with Mr. Patterson, and in the process, ended up having an unbelievably fascinating (and hilarious) conversation on how to design curriculum. Enjoy!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Improving Science Communication Skills - Ako Aotearoa

Improving Science Communication Skills - Ako Aotearoa | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Translating scientific results, conclusions, and recommendations into language easily understood by non-experts is a critical skill for scientists and science learners.

In short, science communication is a critical area of development for science education.

This project developed and evaluated a suite of scenarios that can be used as real-time role-plays that enhance communication skills.

Through these role-plays, learners can gain experience in realistic and challenging situations where they need to rapidly respond in an uncertain environment, and effectively communicate with a range of stakeholders.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Indiana U Expands Active Learning Initiative -- Campus Technology

Indiana U Expands Active Learning Initiative -- Campus Technology | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Indiana University's Mosaic Active Learning Initiative, a program launched in fall 2015 that supports faculty teaching, research and classroom design for active learning environments, has expanded to five of the institution's regional campus: IU East, IU Kokomo, IU Northwest, IU South Bend and IU Southeast.

The move brings 14 new Mosaic Faculty Fellows into the program. Fellows are "faculty who, over the course of an academic year, teach in Mosaic classrooms, share approaches to active and collaborative learning, engage in research related to active learning classrooms, and contribute to the development of learning spaces across IU," according to a university announcement
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Teaching teachers to relinquish control - Christensen Institute

Teaching teachers to relinquish control - Christensen Institute | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The second move for creating a dynamic classroom is to release control to students so that they can make progress without waiting for the class or teacher and practice the mindset of agency. To do this, a teacher must free students from teacher-delivered instruction and give them content and lessons that they can learn independently.

The traditional classroom model does not lend itself well to students learning independently. Its instructional format is predominantly face-to-face, teacher-delivered lectures or demonstrations of the material, and each cohort of students works through a single, unified curriculum at the pace of the whole group. Other learning models are arising, however, that open broad possibilities for teachers to empower students to drive their own learning while teachers shift to helping students in other ways. The main technical innovation behind these new models is online learning, which simplifies the task of putting content and lessons directly in the hands of students for them to control themselves.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
The second move for creating a dynamic classroom is to release control to students so that they can make progress without waiting for the class or teacher and practice the mindset of agency. To do this, a teacher must free students from teacher-delivered instruction and give them content and lessons that they can learn independently. 

The traditional classroom model does not lend itself well to students learning independently. Its instructional format is predominantly face-to-face, teacher-delivered lectures or demonstrations of the material, and each cohort of students works through a single, unified curriculum at the pace of the whole group. Other learning models are arising, however, that open broad possibilities for teachers to empower students to drive their own learning while teachers shift to helping students in other ways. The main technical innovation behind these new models is online learning, which simplifies the task of putting content and lessons directly in the hands of students for them to control themselves.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

How to Ask Relevant Questions for Achieving Authentic Learning

How to Ask Relevant Questions for Achieving Authentic Learning | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Authentic learning is a useful approach for encouraging our learners to develop the critical thinking skills and confidence needed to tackle real-life situations. However, it can be hard to get out of the more traditional mindset where the teacher is the source of knowledge and assessment of information learned is done through the use of clear right or wrong answers to standard questions.

The definition for authentic learning is rather encompassing and may make it difficult for a teacher to get a handle on how to approach its implementation and direct learners in questioning. However, if you have seen kids in an engaged classroom, you may have stumbled upon one of the pillars that are fundamental in an authentic learning experience.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Tobacco and Patchouli: Writing about Teaching

Tobacco and Patchouli: Writing about Teaching | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
To teach, we must believe in the potential of each person in the room. Unwaveringly. This is not to say we don’t get to have our bad days, our off days, the days when we really can’t stand to talk to another student or plan another lesson. But it does mean that we teach for a reason, and that reason lies in what lies in the heart of a student. What lay in our hearts when we were students. Hope despair melancholy desire passion hunger confusion. All the things it takes to learn to walk. All the things it takes to learn to do anything. All the things it takes to live in Los Angeles, or to love someone who is hard to love.
more...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 25, 3:14 PM
This is a great example of what the currere method can look like. How does this teacher understand his teaching and the need for generosity. David Jardine drew on Emmanuel Levinas to write about teaching as a gift that expects nothing in return.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Citations are more than merely assigning credit – their inclusion (or not) conditions how colleagues regard and evaluate your work

Citations are more than merely assigning credit – their inclusion (or not) conditions how colleagues regard and evaluate your work | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The significance of citations goes far beyond energising and rewarding academic competition. Patrick Dunleavy outlines why citations are so important; from setting up a specialist discourse in an economical and highly-focused manner, guiding readers seeking to follow your extended chain of reasoning, right through to showing you have comprehensively surveyed all relevant work and pointed out its consistencies (or otherwise) with your own findings. A better appreciation of the multiple functions of citations should help to address the chronic under-citation that particularly besets the humanities and social sciences.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

The Hidden Costs of Active Learning -- Campus Technology

The Hidden Costs of Active Learning -- Campus Technology | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
I am an active learning college instructor and I'm tired. I don't mean end-of-the-semester and need-some-sleep tired. I mean really, weary, bone-deep tired.

A perfect convergence occurred in my professional life approximately four years ago. First, my university decided to become an iPad institution. Starting that year, every incoming freshman received an iPad (and now, four years later, all students have them). As part of that initiative, my university did something incredibly smart and provided all instructors with extensive professional development for integrating this technology into the classroom. This PD was the best I've had in my 10-year career. Instead of focusing on the iPad, the sessions focused on active learning strategies geared at making learning student-centered and engaging. I remember thinking, "This stuff is great, but when would I ever have the time in class to do this?"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Five Models for Making Sense of Complex Systems – Christina Wodtke – Medium

Five Models for Making Sense of Complex Systems – Christina Wodtke – Medium | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

In one of the classes I teach at CCA, students were confused by mental models, conceptual models, concept maps, etc. I ended up drawing a taxonomy for models on the whiteboard, and it may help others. This post is for them first, then you!


Admittedly, there is no worldwide agreement on these terms, because humans make things and name them as they see fit, often without searching for previous work. UX Design (a.k.a. product design a.k.a. interaction design a.k.a. information architecture etc etc) has a tendency to name and rename things. Ambiguity is inevitable.


I live in hope of a controlled vocabulary for digital design.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Opinion: education in this brave new world demands meaningful human contact

Opinion: education in this brave new world demands meaningful human contact | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

The really big issues facing us as a society have proved to be somehow marginal to our key concerns with university curriculums. The big challenges of our times are not central to our learning. Peter Hymen in his recent report Engaging with Others has observed that we have a one dimensional higher education system in a multidimensional world; that we are living in an age of big challenges, big data, big dilemmas, big crises and big opportunities; yet universities too often are small in ambition, small in their values proposition, and small in their scope.

Hymen argues that we need something different that can meet the challenges of our times and where we can properly engage with learning. His suggestion is that we need an engaged higher education that is academic (based deeply in literacy and numeracy and which is empowering); is about character building (involving independence and autonomy, resilience and open-mindedness for the individual); and is concerned with creativity, craftsmanship and a can-do approach to innovation (which is about problem solving).

Kim Flintoff's insight:
"If we can offer our students an engaged curriculum that will equip them with the knowledge, passion and skills for an improved social result then we will see the signs of a new culture beginning to emerge, one that has real impact on the big issues facing engaged universities, such as action on poverty, the marginalisation of young people, the need for democratic engagement and the impact of new technologies"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Does cellphone use in class encourage active learning? (essay)

Does cellphone use in class encourage active learning? (essay) | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

At a recent academic conference, I attended a plenary session on active learning. While spouting the virtues of student engagement, the presenter seemed to be admonishing cellphone use in class, labeling it as a sign of distracted and bored learners. 


I was feeling uncomfortable in the second row from the front because I was using my phone to take pictures, live-tweet the lecture and engage with other conference attendees on social media. I wondered, “Is he talking about me?” However, not only was I paying attention, but I was also completely engaged in and interacting with his content in a self-directed way. If that’s not active learning, I don’t know what is.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

New Study Shows the Impact of PBL on Student Achievement

New Study Shows the Impact of PBL on Student Achievement | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it


Researchers in Michigan show that project-based learning in high-poverty communities can produce statistically significant gains in social studies and informational reading.

Does project-based learning (PBL) raise student achievement? If you’ve been involved in PBL for long, you’ve undoubtedly encountered this question. Over the last few years as education researchers at University of Michigan and Michigan State University, we have worked to address this question through a large study of the effects of PBL on social studies and some aspects of literacy achievement in second-grade classrooms. We call this initiative Project PLACE: A Project Approach to Literacy and Civic Engagement.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
Researchers in Michigan show that project-based learning in high-poverty communities can produce statistically significant gains in social studies and informational reading.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Turning Teaching Over to Students - DML Central

Turning Teaching Over to Students - DML Central | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Michael Wesch’s YouTube videos gave me the courage — and the ideas — to turn more and more of the responsibility for not just learning, but teaching, over to my students. Like most great educators, Wesch, associate professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University, is a great communicator. Fortunately for us, he is also a YouTube genius, so you don’t have to take my word for it — watch and hear him directly. Most of us first learned of him when his “The Machine is Us/ing Us” went viral 10 years ago, with more than 11 million views — a look at how the Web and hypertext were changing not just our ways of communicating, but our ways of thinking, as well. He also raised an issue that has come to the forefront most recently — as we use the Web, we are teaching it how to change us more effectively. He says he never intended to make a viral video, it was originally meant for his digital ethnography class.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Lecture Capture Can Change Classroom Dynamics for the Better - Faculty Focus | Higher Ed Teaching & Learning

Lecture Capture Can Change Classroom Dynamics for the Better - Faculty Focus | Higher Ed Teaching & Learning | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
When I heard a teacher tell me that they were creating recorded lectures for courses as homework assignments and spending classroom time on discussions and more active learning, I knew right then the value of the lecture capture tools.

Lecture capture technologies are not new to education. The enterprise solutions that exist are amazing and powerful. Tegrity, Echo 360, Sonic Foundry, Camtasia Relay, Wimba, and Elluminate have all had a hand in the market for some time and they all provide an opportunity for teachers to record content that students can access in a variety of formats and locations. Additionally, there are a number of free tools on the market that allow instructors to narrate anything on their computer screen are valuable tools in any classroom environment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

The Seven Techniques of Learning to Learn | Skills Converged

The Seven Techniques of Learning to Learn | Skills Converged | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
“Everything is easier than you think. If you believe otherwise, you are setting yourself up for a hard life.”
Learning should not be as hard as you think. There is a method to the art and just like any skill, learning to learn needs practice and mastery. It is much like speed reading. If you know how to read faster, you can end up reading more books in a given time. Similarly, if you learn how to learn efficiently you can spend less time doing the learning and more time enjoying what you have learned.

As a trainer, the topic of learning to learn is even more important since it is not only beneficial to you, but it also helps you to improve your training. As such, it is worth investing time in.

In this article, you will be introduced to seven highly effective techniques that help you maximise learning in a given time. The following methods are presented as if you are applying them to yourself, but you should consider how you can take advantage of them for your learners in a training environment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Critical Digital Pedagogy and Design

Critical Digital Pedagogy and Design | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Critical instructional design moves toward realizing the possibility for learning that blends a new form of rigor with agency through a practice of inquiry, empathy, and emergence.


The invention of the learning management system was a mistake. And here I’m not going to make the same frustrated argument made numerous times before now that LMSs are limiting structures, that their interface and functionalities control how teachers teach online (although those things are true). The LMS was a mistake because it was premature. In a world that was just waking up to the Internet and the possibility of widely-networked culture, the LMS played to the lowest common denominator, creating a “classroom” that allowed learning—or something like learning—to happen behind tabs, in threaded discussions, and through automated quizzes.

And worse, the LMS convinced us that teaching online was not only possible, it was easy—that digital pedagogy was a mere work of relocation. Take your lectures and your assignments, create a slideshow or a video or a piece of audio, load it all up, and there you have it: online learning.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
Critical instructional design moves toward realizing the possibility for learning that blends a new form of rigor with agency through a practice of inquiry, empathy, and emergence.  
The invention of the learning management system was a mistake. And here I’m not going to make the same frustrated argument made numerous times before now that LMSs are limiting structures, that their interface and functionalities control how teachers teach online (although those things are true). The LMS was a mistake because it was premature. In a world that was just waking up to the Internet and the possibility of widely-networked culture, the LMS played to the lowest common denominator, creating a “classroom” that allowed learning—or something like learning—to happen behind tabs, in threaded discussions, and through automated quizzes. 

 And worse, the LMS convinced us that teaching online was not only possible, it was easy—that digital pedagogy was a mere work of relocation. Take your lectures and your assignments, create a slideshow or a video or a piece of audio, load it all up, and there you have it: online learning.Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Replace teamwork with teaming for more dynamic classrooms - Christensen Institute

Replace teamwork with teaming for more dynamic classrooms - Christensen Institute | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Harvard Business School professor Amy Edmondson is known for her research on teaming, the idea that in today’s fast-paced world, organizations cannot rely on stable teams; instead, they must embrace a culture of teaming—people coming together impromptu to work on a shifting mix of projects with a shifting mix of partners. She wrote:

Teaming is about identifying essential collaborators and quickly getting up to speed on what they know so you can work together to get things done. This more flexible teamwork (in contrast to stable teams) is on the rise in many industries because the work—be it patient care, product development, customized software, or strategic decision-making—increasingly presents complicated interdependencies that have to be managed on the fly. The time between an issue arising and when it must be resolved is shrinking fast. Stepping back to select, build, and prepare the ideal team to handle fast-moving issues is not always practical. So teaming is here to stay.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Harvard Business School professor Amy Edmondson is known for her research on teaming, the idea that in today’s fast-paced world, organizations cannot rely on stable teams; instead, they must embrace a culture of teaming—people coming together impromptu to work on a shifting mix of projects with a shifting mix of partners. She wrote: 

Teaming is about identifying essential collaborators and quickly getting up to speed on what they know so you can work together to get things done. This more flexible teamwork (in contrast to stable teams) is on the rise in many industries because the work—be it patient care, product development, customized software, or strategic decision-making—increasingly presents complicated interdependencies that have to be managed on the fly. The time between an issue arising and when it must be resolved is shrinking fast. Stepping back to select, build, and prepare the ideal team to handle fast-moving issues is not always practical. So teaming is here to stay.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

What is Heutagogy?

A curated conversation of the book Self-Determined Learning edited by Stewart Hase & Chris Kenyon featuring 50 words on every chapter trying to answer the question "What is Heutagogy?" for World Heutagogy Day 26 September 2013
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond

Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
5 Takeaways For Your Classroom

1. Create daily opportunities for students to connect in the presence of a pressing need (or need to know)

2. Resist the temptation to tightly package “instruction,” but rather provide diverse opportunities for students to demonstrate understanding both before and after open-ended collaboration

3. Support students in metacognitive thinking, helping them identify their own “hunches”; model how hunches converge in “the real world”

4. Use concept-mapping, journaling, and other simple tools to help illuminate what thinking and creativity “are,” where they come from

5. Consider swapping out direct instruction–>collaboration–>assessment patterns for more frequent acts of self-directed learning
Kim Flintoff's insight:
5 Takeaways For Your Classroom

1. Create daily opportunities for students to connect in the presence of a pressing need (or need to know)

2. Resist the temptation to tightly package “instruction,” but rather provide diverse opportunities for students to demonstrate understanding both before and after open-ended collaboration

3. Support students in metacognitive thinking, helping them identify their own “hunches”; model how hunches converge in “the real world”

4. Use concept-mapping, journaling, and other simple tools to help illuminate what thinking and creativity “are,” where they come from

5. Consider swapping out direct instruction–>collaboration–>assessment patterns for more frequent acts of self-directed learning
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Creating a Self-Mapped Learning Pathway

Creating a Self-Mapped Learning Pathway | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
One of the questions I get about learning pathways (on the rare occasion someone actually reads this blog and ask a question) is “when we give learners the option to chose between instructor-centered options and learner-centered options, how do they record what they are doing?” Sure, learners could blog about what they do, but that often ends up being a narrative about the pathway they create rather than an actual visual representation of the pathway itself. A blog post is great in many ways, but I think people are often wonder if there is something different.

Currently, there is no tool that does what I would like one to do to cover everything in the process:

Create a map of the learning pathway that one plans to take
Collects artifacts as one follows (and adjusts) that pathway
Adds a layer of reflection on the learning process that explains why choices were made and artifacts were created.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Flintoff
Scoop.it!

Harnessing heutagogy? - Nicola Fern

Harnessing heutagogy? - Nicola Fern | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
In the vastness of the information landscape at everyone’s fingertips, without this guide, the student can easily become bogged down, miss the big picture and indeed massive sections of the potential curriculum.

My own question then, becomes – if we recognise the limitations of the approaches of traditional teacher-led education, and the overwhelming possibilities of heutagogy and the social, connected learning sphere, can these be meshed in some way to provide a stronger whole? Is there a way of embedding heutagogical aspects within learning programmes? Can you incorporate it into instructional design even?

I suppose what I’m talking about is an instructor who leads the learner through the broad content field, giving them the tools to harness their own ideas and generate their own learning opportunities; getting involved where necessary, and stepping back where not.
more...
No comment yet.