Flipped Classrooms
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Framing the Learning in the Blended Learning Environment - Getting Smart by Guest Author - #blendchat, blended learning, Competency-based learning, edchat

Framing the Learning in the Blended Learning Environment - Getting Smart by Guest Author - #blendchat, blended learning, Competency-based learning, edchat | Flipped Classrooms | Scoop.it
In a high quality competency based learning model, competencies are designed on conceptual understandings within and between a content areas.

Via Thomas Faltin
Meleny Weber's insight:
This blog entry titled from the blog “Getting Smart”, is about blending learning, and the common misconceptions about it. This entry is interesting because it shows a different side to the topic, and goes further than just explaining what blended learning is. The first misconception the author brings up is the fact that many people think it lacks the rigor found in a “normal” classroom. She then goes on to say that students learn the same amount of information just in a different way. This way is more catered to them, so they learn more without all the struggling. I completely agree with her on this. For example, in a typical classroom there are 30 or so students. Not every single student is going to be on the same level as one another. A teacher may teach one lesson to the class, and only half of them understand it. The teacher has no choice but to move on, making the class more difficult for many students to continue on and catch up. With a flipped classroom or online learning, the students who understand a lesson can move on to the next lesson without waiting for the rest of the class. The students struggling with a specific lesson can receive one-on-one help from the teacher, and learn at his or her own pace. All of the students in the class learn the exact same amount of information as students in a normal classroom, but at varying rates. She ends her blog entry by saying that we should try our best to create a challenging classroom no matter where that may be; online or in a room, we should all have the same goals in mind. I really like the way she ends her entry. Such a strong statement (that I wrote in my own words) really leaves the reader thinking about what was said. I agree that it should not matter where a student learns, as long as they are being challenged; it is a good and successful classroom. It's interesting to me that some people think Blended Learning is not as challenging for students. To me it isn't about which way of learning is harder, it is about which method allows each and every student to learn to his or her full potential. If Blended Learning allows more one-on-one time with the teacher, I feel as though that is more beneficial to the students.
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Kloo Hansen's curator insight, November 1, 2013 3:00 PM

If you are doubtful about Blended Learning's level of rigor, you might consider reading this :)

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Community Post: What Is A Flipped Classroom ?

Community Post: What Is A Flipped Classroom ? | Flipped Classrooms | Scoop.it
ProProfs presents you this info-graphic that introduces the concept of flipped classrooms. It offers you information on how teachers and students respond to this new idea of learning. Providing a n...
Meleny Weber's insight:

This buzzfeed is a picture diagram full of statistics about the success of flipped classrooms. It starts off by explaining what exactly a flipped classroom is. Teachers videotape lectures that students watch at home, and during school they work on activities to stregthen and understand the lesson from lecture. Then it moves on to the reasons why flipped classrooms became a thing. They say that only 69% of freshmen actually graduate high school. 7200 students drop out of school every day. These numbers are way too high, and people knew something had to be changed. The buzzfeed then goes on to discuss the results of flipped classrooms; saying that 85% of teachers see an overall improvement in the grades of their students. They also go on to say that flipped classrooms allow much more student-teacher interaction, there is an improvement in student interaction with the material, and each student can move at his or her own pace. If a student fully understand the concept at hand, they can move on to the next topic. At the same time, if one student is falling behind, the teacher will notice and can offer more one-on-one assistance with the topic. The diagram also brings up an interesting topic about students not falling behind if they miss class. I never thought about this before, but it is very true. If a student misses a week of school for having the flu, they can still get access to the videos of the teacher's lectures online. This way, they still know what is happening in the classroom, and once they return, they will be all caught up. In my opinion this article makes flipped classrooms awesome. It is bias however, because they do not right anything negative towards flipped classrooms. It does not show both sides (the pros and cons), so it can be deceiving to people who read it. However, maybe there are not that many significant cons of flipped classrooms.

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My Flipped Classroom

My Flipped Classroom | Flipped Classrooms | Scoop.it
Meleny Weber's insight:
This is a blog of a teacher and her experience with her flipped classroom. Her blog is called, “My Flipped Classroom”, and it has over 85 entries in the past three years. I decided to look at her most recent post from November 25th, Genius Hour. After looking around her blog for more information, I found out that she lectured the kids about different presentations they could give; culture, music, art, food, etc. They could pretty much research and make a presentation on anything that interested them. Then during class they had time to work on their presentations for several days. Her blog post was a picture and short description of what each student presented on. It was awesome to see how creative these kids were when thinking about what they wanted to research. This idea of letting their minds wander, reminded me of un-schooling. I learned about un-schooling in class at UMD, and was immediately fascinated by the ideas. These schools allow students to do whatever they want, and learn in their own way according to their interests. There is no strict curriculum, and the students can learn about their interests with help of teachers. I could not help but notice that this teacher, Mrs. Bush, was incorporating flipped classrooms with un-schooling. A completely new idea, I have never heard anything about. Her lesson about “Genius Hour”, which is the students’ opportunity to present, uses a lot of technology, one of my other topics on Scoopit. It is amazing how diverse today’s classrooms are becoming. I think it is awesome to have students learn in a variety of ways. Her students must never get bored of what they are doing because they chose what they want to research, and they get to use technology like the computer to research it. Another thing I found on her blog was a comment from a woman who runs a website called VideoClass. This website is an amazing source or tool for all teachers with flipped classrooms. It can even be helpful for students across the U.S. in normal classrooms. It is a website full of videos from teachers and tutors lecturing on all different topics from Art to Physics. Teachers can visit the website, and show their students other teacher’s videos. The more videos, the more students can learn and fully understand the material. This blog tied in a lot of things I have been learning and researching recently, and it was very cool to see them working successfully all together. I will definitely continue to follow and read Mrs. Bush’s blog as I develop into a teacher myself. The best ideas come from fellow teachers!
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Blended learning in 2 minutes and 38 seconds

Many educators believe that blended learning is the best solution to today's educational challenges. But what exactly is blended learning? And how can it hel...
Meleny Weber's insight:
This video is a great way to summarize what this new wave of learning is. The video is narrated and produced by a man on YouTube who has several videos about working in a flipped classroom environment. In the beginning he explains what a flipped classroom is, saying that it is when students watch their teacher’s lectures online at home, and receive individualized help during class time. He then goes on to use a metaphor to describe flipped classrooms. He says that strawberries (online) and ice cream (face-to-face interaction) are both very good on their own, but when you mix them together and make a sundae, you get something even better! Basically, this means that when you add face-to-face student-teacher interaction with online learning you get the best mix for learning possible. The narrator then goes on to talk about a teacher he knows personally and her experience with a flipped classroom. He says that after the students watch her lectures at home they take a short quiz. This quiz is graded online and allows the teacher to see who understood the lesson and who did not. She then can plan her next lesson much easier with this knowledge. She can also see who needs the most focus and attention the next day in class when they complete activities about the lesson. Teachers cannot do this without a flipped classroom because there is simply not enough time. Teachers cannot hand out and grade quizzes after every single lesson they give. They have to move on to the next thing of the day. I think this is a great benefit of flipped classrooms because it makes the classroom much more efficient. The narrator also brings up the fact that teachers may not buy into the idea of students learning at home because they have been telling their students to read the chapters at home for a long time. Flipped classrooms are different though because the students learn at home online! Having learning online is more interesting to them, and there are many various sources that can really help. Another one of my topics for Scoopit is technology in the classroom. This ties into all of my articles about technology with the different sources available to teachers and students. However, it is different because those articles are mainly for technology being used inside the classroom, whereas flipped classrooms use technology outside the classroom, at home. I am very interested in flipped classrooms, and want to observe a successful model in person. Maybe one day I will teach a flipped classroom. Could blending learning be right for your classroom or student?
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Framing the Learning in the Blended Learning Environment - Getting Smart by Guest Author - #blendchat, blended learning, Competency-based learning, edchat

Framing the Learning in the Blended Learning Environment - Getting Smart by Guest Author - #blendchat, blended learning, Competency-based learning, edchat | Flipped Classrooms | Scoop.it
In a high quality competency based learning model, competencies are designed on conceptual understandings within and between a content areas.

Via Thomas Faltin
Meleny Weber's insight:
This blog entry titled from the blog “Getting Smart”, is about blending learning, and the common misconceptions about it. This entry is interesting because it shows a different side to the topic, and goes further than just explaining what blended learning is. The first misconception the author brings up is the fact that many people think it lacks the rigor found in a “normal” classroom. She then goes on to say that students learn the same amount of information just in a different way. This way is more catered to them, so they learn more without all the struggling. I completely agree with her on this. For example, in a typical classroom there are 30 or so students. Not every single student is going to be on the same level as one another. A teacher may teach one lesson to the class, and only half of them understand it. The teacher has no choice but to move on, making the class more difficult for many students to continue on and catch up. With a flipped classroom or online learning, the students who understand a lesson can move on to the next lesson without waiting for the rest of the class. The students struggling with a specific lesson can receive one-on-one help from the teacher, and learn at his or her own pace. All of the students in the class learn the exact same amount of information as students in a normal classroom, but at varying rates. She ends her blog entry by saying that we should try our best to create a challenging classroom no matter where that may be; online or in a room, we should all have the same goals in mind. I really like the way she ends her entry. Such a strong statement (that I wrote in my own words) really leaves the reader thinking about what was said. I agree that it should not matter where a student learns, as long as they are being challenged; it is a good and successful classroom. It's interesting to me that some people think Blended Learning is not as challenging for students. To me it isn't about which way of learning is harder, it is about which method allows each and every student to learn to his or her full potential. If Blended Learning allows more one-on-one time with the teacher, I feel as though that is more beneficial to the students.
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Kloo Hansen's curator insight, November 1, 2013 3:00 PM

If you are doubtful about Blended Learning's level of rigor, you might consider reading this :)

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How one school turned homework on its head with 'flipped' instruction

How one school turned homework on its head with 'flipped' instruction | Flipped Classrooms | Scoop.it
Meleny Weber's insight:

This article is about a high school in Michigan that was the first school to adopt the idea of flipped classrooms. This is where teachers record videos of themselves lecturing the lesson, and the students watch this as homework. During classtime, the students complete activities, similar to homework, and the teacher can offer more personalized one on one assistance. This specific school decided to make the switch when the principal realized that more than half of the ninth grade class was failing math, english, and science. It was one of the worst public schools in the state, and they knew something had to change. After switching to flipped classrooms, test scores rose dramatically, and the failure rates dropped from 52% to 19%. The article says that clearly this method of schooling helped this specific school, but it may not be the answer for other schools. It touches on the fact that not that many schools have fully implemented the new system of flipped classrooms, so not enough data has been collected. People are unsure whether or not flipped classrooms or blended learning is the best thing for all students, but obviously it helped these students from Michigan. 

I have mixed feelings about blended learning. I agree with the article in such that it could really benefit some students. Kids need more one on one help with schoolwork, and flipped classrooms allows those students to get more help from their teachers. On the other hand, there are some students that do not have a computer or internet at home. Maybe, some of the teachers do not have the best tools to record themselves lecturing, or maybe it is hard to get their point across unless they are directly speaking to the class. There are defintely pros and cons to flipped classrooms, but I am curious to see what will happen in the future. Will all of our classrooms turn into flipped classrooms? One day when I am a teacher, will I be doing the same thing? 

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Blooms-with-notes.png (637x477 pixels)

Blooms-with-notes.png (637x477 pixels) | Flipped Classrooms | Scoop.it
Meleny Weber's insight:

A very interesting diagram that shows many of the possible electronic websites and programs that students can use to learn at home.There are different programs that help with different skills students should learn. For example, voice thread and protagonize can help students learn to work together and make group projects/presentations. Of course, you can still teach students group projects in the classroom without all of these online programs. Simply, place them in groups and give them an assignment. One benefit I see from this is having a group project at home frees up more time for work and help from the teacher in class. This diagram ties into my scoopit topic of technology in the classroom. I have read and written about many articles and blogs that list and explain various programs that would be beneficial in the classroom. Technology and flipped classrooms or blended learning go hand in hand. One  issue this brings up to me is the fact that not every student has the ability to own or use a computer to do schoolwork at home.  It would be good if students without access to internet/computer were offered the opportunity to use the school's media center or library throughout the day, or maybe after school. This would allow every student to get the most out of flipped classrooms. I find it interesting that it's in a pyramid shape, making it seem like some programs are more important than others. This is simply one person's view of what they believe is most valuable for a student. I wish the creator of this diagram had a link to give an explanation of what each program is or can do for the students. This would make it a stronger picture of flipped classrooms. 

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Teachers, parents say students thrive in 'flipped learning' classrooms

Teachers, parents say students thrive in 'flipped learning' classrooms | Flipped Classrooms | Scoop.it
There's a quiet revolution happening in some local classrooms. It's called 'Flipped Learning,' and teachers, students and parents are raving about it. - Local at MyNorthwest.com

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Meleny Weber's insight:
This article shows a unique method in a flipped classroom. Instead of the students going home to listen to a recorded lecture, they hear it in class. This article talks about a specific teacher, Mr. Brown, who divides his class of 24 into three groups. One group listens to the pre-recorded lesson, while another meets with Mr. Brown and learns the same lesson, while the third group of students meets together for group-work sometimes with the assistance of a parent volunteer. This method sounds awesome! The students get twice as much instruction, and also get more one-on-one assistance from the teacher. They also receive immediate feedback from Mr. Brown, the parent volunteer, and their fellow students. The article then goes on and quotes some of the students in the class. In an interview with one student, Emma, she says that she is very shy and tends to not ask questions. Now, in a flipped classroom she has the opportunity to re-watch the lesson and answer the question herself, also making her a stronger student in the long-term. The author of the article also interviewed the mother of twins in the flipped classroom. She absolutely loves this new method because when her kids miss class they can catch up with schoolwork and keep up with the lesson plans simply by logging online. Flipped classrooms help get parents more involved with their students learning. I know when I was in school and I did not understand a math technique, I would always ask my Dad for help. He went to school a long time before I did, and therefore knows different techniques then we were taught. With flipped classrooms, the parents can watch the video, and help teach their children the teacher’s method. More interviews with students show that they really enjoy the new method of a flipped classroom. They finish most of their work in the classroom, because they do not have to wait for other children to understand, and therefore have more free time to participate in extracurricular activities. I really enjoyed this article because it showed a different side to flipped classrooms. This is the only information I found that included the parents view on the situation. The parents in this article put it in a positive light. They did not ask very many parents, so this could be biased article, but after all of my other research and curating, I have to agree that flipped classrooms and blended learning is the future. I think it really helps a lot of students, and makes the classroom a more equal and exciting place to learn! I am definitely thinking about working in a school that practices flipped classrooms because I truly think it is the best option for many students across the nation.
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Stephanie Haumont's curator insight, September 15, 2013 11:01 PM

Successes!

Debra Evans's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:12 PM

Must read 

Meleny Weber's comment, October 14, 2013 4:35 PM
I like seeing the parent's response to Flipped Classrooms. You normally only hear of a teacher's view or the students' view on the new method. Parents should be very involved in their kid's learning, so their opinion does in fact matter.