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flânerie
collections of a magpie mind with eclectic interests, relentless curiosity and a taste for windmill tilting
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The Urbanophile » New York: Leadership in Transportation Design

The Urbanophile » New York: Leadership in Transportation Design | flânerie | Scoop.it
NYC setting example for other North American Cities-Complete Streets, public space and street art:.@urbanophile article http://t.co/RYXHIhf...

 

I previously wrote about how the Parable of the Talents can be viewed as purely descriptive, not normative. It does seem that the people who are already at the top of the heap are able to keep getting more good stuff. While in a dynamic society fortunes rise and fall, it can be surprisingly difficult to displace an entrenched incumbent absent a major market disruption. Perhaps that helps explain why New York City isn’t just on top, it continues to do things that distinguish it.

 

Given that New York is more or less fully developed, I wouldn’t have expected it to be a hotbed of transportation innovation. But surprisingly, New York has displayed a lot of leadership in the area of transportation design of late when it comes to its streets. I won’t claim it is better than anyone else in the world, but there are definitely good things happening there, so let’s take a look.

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Pocket Gardens Sprout on Paris's Anti-Parking Posts

Pocket Gardens Sprout on Paris's Anti-Parking Posts | flânerie | Scoop.it
A 'Potogreen' in Paris. Photo: Anne Mazauric via Paule Kingleur. Necessary as they are to keep cars from blocking the sidewalk, anti-parking posts, or bollards, can be an ugly sight in a city.

 

Parisian artist Paule Kingleur has commandeered some of the 335,000 posts in the French capital as sites for hanging micro-gardens -- what she calls a neighborhood "vegetable insurrection."

 

"Tomatoes, arugula, radishes, and flowers of all kinds" grow in these micro-gardens, according to the website Le Parisien. Kingleur worked with 600 children from Paris schools to plant the seeds and help keep them growing, she told Treehugger in an email this week about her "Potogreen" project.

 

Sewn Out Of Recycled Tents
"Children are adopting gardens. They are responsible for their care and are committed to leaving them in public spaces," Kingleur told Le Parisien.

 

The planters themselves are about as eco-friendly as you can get, made of discarded milk cartons collected from local businesses and wrapped in fabric pockets sewn out of recycled tents by Emmaus Maisons-Alfort, a rehabilitation association that works with homeless people.

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