Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years
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Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years
Determining what the five most important technologies will be in the next 5 to 10 years.
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Hitachi targets 2015 for glass-based data storage that lasts 100 million years | PCWorld

Hitachi targets 2015 for glass-based data storage that lasts 100 million years | PCWorld | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
Hitachi has developed a glass-based data storage medium that is highly heat and water resistant, capable of holding data for hundreds of millions of years, and says it may be able to bring it to market by 2015.
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World's Smallest Nanolaser a Breakthrough for Optical Computing

World's Smallest Nanolaser a Breakthrough for Optical Computing | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
Physicists build what they say is the world's smallest semiconductor laser, a breakthrough in photonic technology with possible applications ranging from computing to medicine.
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Nicholas John Whittred's comment, March 22, 2013 2:32 AM
Optical Computing uses photons rather than electrons to transport data, which uses less energy and produces less heat.
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Autonomous Cars Patrol Israeli Border

Autonomous Cars Patrol Israeli Border | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
The cars don't require orders to carry out their mission. (Israel joins the ranks of driverless vehicle developers. http://t.co/prSRhKxN7d)
Nicholas John Whittred's insight:

This gives a great insight to how driverless vehicles are already within Israel's military.

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Nicholas John Whittred's comment, March 22, 2013 2:23 AM
If the Israeli government are allowing a driverless car to patrol than it is only a matter of time before they become commercialized and sold to individuals.
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BMW Pledges To Have Driverless Cars By 2020

BMW Pledges To Have Driverless Cars By 2020 | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it

BMW Group and Continental Automotive are collaborating to improve driver assistance systems, otherwise known as “highly automated driving.” With this partnership, BMW hopes to have fully automated driving “ready for implementation by 2020.”...


Via LeapMind
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Driverless Cars: Now Street-Legal in California

Driverless Cars: Now Street-Legal in California | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
Take it from a California resident: you see a lot of crazy things in this state. And it's about to get a lot crazier, thanks to Jerry Brown and Google. (@kayleighmcenany Where' have U been on this Miss K?
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Leading the 5G charge - Information Age

Leading the 5G charge - Information Age | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
Leading the 5G charge
Information Age
The university's Centre for Communication Systems Research (CCSR) is the largest academic research centre for mobile communications in the UK, housing 130 researchers and around 90 PhD students.
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Nicholas John Whittred's comment, March 22, 2013 2:36 AM
The researchers working on 5G are hoping to make it more energy efficient. They are also researching if it is possible to use mobile devices on lower frequencies.
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Apple Reveals Advances in Facial Recognition Software - Patently ...

Apple Reveals Advances in Facial Recognition Software - Patently ... | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
On March 7, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published ten original patent applications from Apple. In this report we focus on Apple's invention that generally relates to advancing facial recognition and detection ...
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Data that lives forever is possible: Japan's Hitachi

Data that lives forever is possible: Japan's Hitachi | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
As Bob Dylan and the Rolling Stones prove, good music lasts a long time; now Japanese hi-tech giant Hitachi says it can last even longer—a few hundred million years at least.
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Nicholas John Whittred's comment, March 22, 2013 2:25 AM
Obviously this is a great discovery and will definitely be used within the business industry holding things such as stock data etc. But I doubt this will be available to the average consumer right away.
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Why haven't biometrics replaced passwords yet? - Digital Trends

Why haven't biometrics replaced passwords yet? - Digital Trends | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
Digital Trends
Why haven't biometrics replaced passwords yet?
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This article looks at biometrics and gives detailed reasons as to why right now they are impractical at this current stage.

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Nicholas John Whittred's comment, March 22, 2013 2:24 AM
This gives us details on the problems with using facial recognition software.
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All Optical Nanoparticle Computing

Solution: Many people have proposed optical computing as the next technology to continue Moore's Law because photons move several orders of magnitude faster than electrons, do not lose energy while moving.
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Apple iPad controls driverless car – MacDailyNews - Welcome Home

“Oxford University isn't the only group working on an iPad-controlled car,” Kelly Hodgkins reports for TUAW. “As reported by Wired, a team of Russian hackers have also developed their own version of this Bond-inspired ...
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Nicholas John Whittred's comment, March 22, 2013 2:27 AM
There aren't only big companies researching driverless cars, students from Oxford have been working on an iPad controlled vehicle. Also Russian students have created their own version.
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Quantum Information stored in a single atom transferred onto a photon

Quantum Information stored in a single atom transferred onto a photon | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it

Thanks to the strange laws of quantum mechanics, quantum computers would be able to carry out certain computational tasks much faster than conventional computers.  Among the most promising technologies for the construction of a quantum computer are systems of single atoms, confined in so-called ion traps and manipulated with lasers.  In the laboratory, these systems have already been used to test key building blocks of a future quantum computer.  “Currently, we can carry out successful quantum computations with atoms,” explain Andreas Stute and Bernardo Casabone, both PhD students at the University of Innsbruck’s Institute for Experimental Physics. “But we are still missing viable interfaces with which quantum information can be transferred over optical channels from one computer to another.”


What makes the construction of these interfaces especially challenging is that the laws of quantum mechanics don’t allow quantum information to be simply copied. Instead, a future quantum internet – that is, a network of quantum computers linked by optical channels – would have to transfer quantum information onto individual particles of light, known as photons.  These photons would then be transported over an optical-fiber link to a distant computing site.  Now, for the first time, quantum information has been directly transferred from an atom in an ion trap onto a single photon.  The work is reported in the current issue of Nature Photonics by a research team led by Tracy Northup and Rainer Blatt.

 

The University of Innsbruck physicists first trap a single calcium ion in an ion trap and position it between two highly reflective mirrors.  “We use a laser to write the desired quantum information onto the electronic states of the atom,” explains Stute. “The atom is then excited with a second laser, and as a result, it emits a photon.  At this moment, we write the atom’s quantum information onto the polarization state of the photon, thus mapping it onto the light particle.”  The photon is stored between the mirrors until it eventually flies out through one mirror, which is less reflective than the other.  “The two mirrors steer the photon in a specific direction, effectively guiding it into an optical fiber,” says Casabone.  The quantum information stored in the photon could thus be conveyed over the optical fiber to a distant quantum computer, where the same technique could be applied in reverse to write it back onto an atom.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Nicholas John Whittred's comment, March 22, 2013 2:39 AM
If the internet is to harness the power of quantum computers data will have to be transferred via photons.
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Millimeter Waves Will Expand The Wireless Future - Electronic Design

Millimeter Waves Will Expand The Wireless Future - Electronic Design | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
Millimeter Waves Will Expand The Wireless Future
Electronic Design
Backhaul is generally defined as any point-to-point (P2P) communications link between remotely connected sites. It can be wired or wireless.
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Google wants self-driving cars on the road in 3-5 years, but regulators are pumping the brakes

Google wants self-driving cars on the road in 3-5 years, but regulators are pumping the brakes | Five Most Important Technologies in the next 5 to 10 years | Scoop.it
The potential of Google's (GOOG) driverless cars is very enticing. Not only would they likely drastically reduce accident rates in the United States but they could also allow drivers to play Minecr...
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Nicholas John Whittred's comment, March 22, 2013 2:30 AM
What Google has to get under control are the liabilities of having a driverless car. They need to make sure that their software controlling the car has zero faults. This software will have to be designed for specific cars and each type of car will have to have their own custom software as to change these variables (such as horse power, model of the breaks, etc.). Which leads me to believe that Google will be releasing their own vehicle with this software or perhaps they will partner with some big name car brands.