Five Jobs -- OHS Aspects
34 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Paul Coulthard
Scoop.it!

Steve See

Steve See | Five Jobs -- OHS Aspects | Scoop.it
Paul Coulthard is on Scoop.it since Today, 11:04 AM
Paul Coulthard's insight:

MR Steve See is a Singapore taxi driver.

 

His job:

Mr Steve See is a Singapore taxi-driver. He reported that his taxi-driver qualification course was about one month long. His OHS duties include a pre-shift check of the vehicle (engine, transmission & battery fluid levels, absence of oil/fluid leaks, tyre pressures and general vehicle condition). Every six months he has the legally-required roadworthy inspection done on his vehicle. On-shift he takes care that passengers enter and exit safety, which may occur on-street or at specific taxi-stops. He ensures that his passengers wear their seat-belts and he will only carry four passengers (the legal load limit). He also described the procedures for safely changing a flat tyre, which included using the new tyre and old tyre (in turn) as “safety stands” under the jacked-up car and gripping the tyres (to remove and refit) at the “8 o’clock” and “4 o’clock” positions; he mentioned that he had needed to explain that process to another driver. A colleague of Steve’s, Mr DR (who declined to be further identified or photographed) referred to the business pressures of driving a taxi. These included the high cost of petrol and the "24/7" rental costs of the vehicle which had he had to pay rain/hail/shine, sickness/health and even when the vehicle was in maintenance. He admitted to self-medicating and driving when sick (for fear of a "no work" doctor's certificate). He also stated that he kept maintenance and repairs to a minimum (even though the taxi owner paid for this) due to the long queues at the workshop. He was also something of an "orange/red light runner".

 

Conclusion and comments:

Two very different perspectives. One driver seemed quite aware of and quite comfortable with his OHS responsibilities, another unsure about safely changing a flat tyre and the last seemed so totally overwhelmed by business pressures that he gave little thought to OHS.

Job hazards include the occasional violent passenger (not common in Singapore), traffic accidents, long hours sitting, strain or injury during vehicle maintenance (eg changing a tyre) and long shifts.

more...
Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:29 AM

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef.

 

His job:

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef at the BOON TAT Street BBQ Seafood kitchen which is part of the Singapore Flyer "street scene". His duties include a variety of OHS tasks, cleanliness of his kitchen (before, during and after his shift), safe operation of gas cookers, clean/healthy storage of raw foods and clean/healthy cooking. His limited knowledge of English made further interview difficult. He would, no doubt be well aware of the importance of these duties (as would anyone who has had food poisoning) as the Singapore authorities have an active kitchen/restaurant hygiene program that includes a "report poor hygiene" 1800 telephone number.

 

Conclusion and comments:

The kitchen seemed to be very clean and well organised, the food display seemed hygienic ---- and the BBQ-ed seafood and vegetables were delicious. It was a healthy kitchen to buy food from.

Job hazards include working with gas-fire, inflammable gases, ,hot metal woks and sharps (knives), working in a small cramped kitchen with several also busy co-workers and late night shifts.

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:34 AM

Ms AG is an office receptionist.

 

Her job:

Ms AG works (in Australia) as an office receptionist for a business that does most of its work off-site. About seven other staff use that office as a work base. During her three months there AG has received no OH&S induction training or briefing. She is aware of the one exit for emergencies (the main entrance door) and that there are no other emergency exits. Her work desk and work area are ergonomically satisfactory. She reports that the "back office" area has a number of slip/trip hazards. AG has not been given any OHS duties. A colleague of AG’s suggested that she was overstating the slip/trip issue, but also mentioned a high staff turnover due to the stressfulness of some of the jobs.

 

Conclusion and comments:

This is far from satisfactory from a general OHS perspective or with regards to WHSA 2011. Quite understandably, AG would not agree to be photographed or to allow publication of her name.

Job hazards include long periods sitting working at a computer, the above-mentioned slip/trip hazards in the "back office", poor communication with her boss (and associated stress) and the lack of OH&S induction training.

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:52 AM

Ms JS is a Singapore tour-guide.

 

Her job:

Ms JS works for Singapore DUCK Tours which uses ex-military amphibious vehicles to tour the Singapore River and nearby city environs. In many ways JS’ job is similar to that of an air hostess. Apart from JS' key role as tour guide, she is the crew-member responsible for passenger safety. Before the vehicle leaves its land departure point, she briefs passengers on the two emergency exit points (one on each side), the exit procedure (don't go until instructed, and then go left and/or right as instructed) and the location (under seats) of life jackets. JS did not demonstrate wearing life-jackets; it was not clear whether that was her oversight or a company/systemic issue. JS also briefs that in an extreme emergency the captain might order "abandon DUCK", in which case passengers were to jump straight overboard. Finally JS points out to the various key safety signs that are displayed for passengers to read. During the tour the DUCK drives down a launch ramp into the river; this is done to create a big splash effect for passenger excitement. Immediately before this manoeuvre JS announces the need to remain seated and for passengers to securely hold onto children. Once the DUCK is in the river, JS cleans up any water-splash slip hazards. JS does a similar "hold tight" announcement for the river to land transfer. JS would also operate the DUCK's fire extinguishers if needed and throw life-buoys if someone were to fall overboard.


Conclusion & comments:

JS's main job is tour guide and she is a very entertaining and informative one. However she has an equally important role as safety attendant and she is fully aware of all that involves; her safety briefs were excellent, except that she did not demonstrate donning a life-jacket.

(When I complemented JS on her excellent tour brief and explained my CQU project, she seemed very nervous about providing her surname; she had previously introduced herself by her first name. Out of respect for JS' nervousness, I have “shopped” her photo and not identified her.)

Job hazards include exposure to sunlight (and the elements in general), slip/trip on the DUCK deck, falling overboard (on land or on water), and the DUCK sinking (very unlikely).

Scooped by Paul Coulthard
Scoop.it!

Kiry Chinej

Kiry Chinej | Five Jobs -- OHS Aspects | Scoop.it
Paul Coulthard is on Scoop.it since Today, 11:04 AM
Paul Coulthard's insight:

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef.

 

His job:

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef at the BOON TAT Street BBQ Seafood kitchen which is part of the Singapore Flyer "street scene". His duties include a variety of OHS tasks, cleanliness of his kitchen (before, during and after his shift), safe operation of gas cookers, clean/healthy storage of raw foods and clean/healthy cooking. His limited knowledge of English made further interview difficult. He would, no doubt be well aware of the importance of these duties (as would anyone who has had food poisoning) as the Singapore authorities have an active kitchen/restaurant hygiene program that includes a "report poor hygiene" 1800 telephone number.

 

Conclusion and comments:

The kitchen seemed to be very clean and well organised, the food display seemed hygienic ---- and the BBQ-ed seafood and vegetables were delicious. It was a healthy kitchen to buy food from.

Job hazards include working with gas-fire, inflammable gases, ,hot metal woks and sharps (knives), working in a small cramped kitchen with several also busy co-workers and late night shifts.

more...
Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:25 AM

Mr Alvin Tan is a table-cleaner.

 

His job:

Alvin is a table-cleaner at the Singapore Flyer “street eats” dining area. He clears the used trays, plates and utensils (which will have come from any one of a dozen different kitchen stalls). He then scrupulously wipes the dining tables clean for the next diners. He is cheerful, friendly and talkative and takes great pride in his work. His tables are cleaner than those that would be found in similar dining areas in Australia.

 

Conclusion & comments:

Alvin's job is simple, low-skilled and probably lowly-paid, but it makes a big contribution to the health of the Singapore Flyer "street eats" diners. He would be well aware of his health responsibilities as such dining areas are regularly inspected by the Singapore authorities.

Job hazards include the health hazard associated with working with "used" food, "used" eating utensils and garbage bins, slip/trip hazards in the dining area, late night shifts and occasional long shifts.

 

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:34 AM

Ms AG is an office receptionist.

 

Her job:

Ms AG works (in Australia) as an office receptionist for a business that does most of its work off-site. About seven other staff use that office as a work base. During her three months there AG has received no OH&S induction training or briefing. She is aware of the one exit for emergencies (the main entrance door) and that there are no other emergency exits. Her work desk and work area are ergonomically satisfactory. She reports that the "back office" area has a number of slip/trip hazards. AG has not been given any OHS duties. A colleague of AG’s suggested that she was overstating the slip/trip issue, but also mentioned a high staff turnover due to the stressfulness of some of the jobs.

 

Conclusion and comments:

This is far from satisfactory from a general OHS perspective or with regards to WHSA 2011. Quite understandably, AG would not agree to be photographed or to allow publication of her name.

Job hazards include long periods sitting working at a computer, the above-mentioned slip/trip hazards in the "back office", poor communication with her boss (and associated stress) and the lack of OH&S induction training.

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:52 AM

Ms JS is a Singapore tour-guide.

 

Her job:

Ms JS works for Singapore DUCK Tours which uses ex-military amphibious vehicles to tour the Singapore River and nearby city environs. In many ways JS’ job is similar to that of an air hostess. Apart from JS' key role as tour guide, she is the crew-member responsible for passenger safety. Before the vehicle leaves its land departure point, she briefs passengers on the two emergency exit points (one on each side), the exit procedure (don't go until instructed, and then go left and/or right as instructed) and the location (under seats) of life jackets. JS did not demonstrate wearing life-jackets; it was not clear whether that was her oversight or a company/systemic issue. JS also briefs that in an extreme emergency the captain might order "abandon DUCK", in which case passengers were to jump straight overboard. Finally JS points out to the various key safety signs that are displayed for passengers to read. During the tour the DUCK drives down a launch ramp into the river; this is done to create a big splash effect for passenger excitement. Immediately before this manoeuvre JS announces the need to remain seated and for passengers to securely hold onto children. Once the DUCK is in the river, JS cleans up any water-splash slip hazards. JS does a similar "hold tight" announcement for the river to land transfer. JS would also operate the DUCK's fire extinguishers if needed and throw life-buoys if someone were to fall overboard.


Conclusion & comments:

JS's main job is tour guide and she is a very entertaining and informative one. However she has an equally important role as safety attendant and she is fully aware of all that involves; her safety briefs were excellent, except that she did not demonstrate donning a life-jacket.

(When I complemented JS on her excellent tour brief and explained my CQU project, she seemed very nervous about providing her surname; she had previously introduced herself by her first name. Out of respect for JS' nervousness, I have “shopped” her photo and not identified her.)

Job hazards include exposure to sunlight (and the elements in general), slip/trip on the DUCK deck, falling overboard (on land or on water), and the DUCK sinking (very unlikely).

Scooped by Paul Coulthard
Scoop.it!

AG

AG | Five Jobs -- OHS Aspects | Scoop.it
Paul Coulthard is on Scoop.it since Today, 11:04 AM
Paul Coulthard's insight:

Ms AG is an office receptionist.

 

Her job:

Ms AG works (in Australia) as an office receptionist for a business that does most of its work off-site. About seven other staff use that office as a work base. During her three months there AG has received no OH&S induction training or briefing. She is aware of the one exit for emergencies (the main entrance door) and that there are no other emergency exits. Her work desk and work area are ergonomically satisfactory. She reports that the "back office" area has a number of slip/trip hazards. AG has not been given any OHS duties. A colleague of AG’s suggested that she was overstating the slip/trip issue, but also mentioned a high staff turnover due to the stressfulness of some of the jobs.

 

Conclusion and comments:

This is far from satisfactory from a general OHS perspective or with regards to WHSA 2011. Quite understandably, AG would not agree to be photographed or to allow publication of her name.

Job hazards include long periods sitting working at a computer, the above-mentioned slip/trip hazards in the "back office", poor communication with her boss (and associated stress) and the lack of OH&S induction training.

more...
Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:25 AM

Mr Alvin Tan is a table-cleaner.

 

His job:

Alvin is a table-cleaner at the Singapore Flyer “street eats” dining area. He clears the used trays, plates and utensils (which will have come from any one of a dozen different kitchen stalls). He then scrupulously wipes the dining tables clean for the next diners. He is cheerful, friendly and talkative and takes great pride in his work. His tables are cleaner than those that would be found in similar dining areas in Australia.

 

Conclusion & comments:

Alvin's job is simple, low-skilled and probably lowly-paid, but it makes a big contribution to the health of the Singapore Flyer "street eats" diners. He would be well aware of his health responsibilities as such dining areas are regularly inspected by the Singapore authorities.

Job hazards include the health hazard associated with working with "used" food, "used" eating utensils and garbage bins, slip/trip hazards in the dining area, late night shifts and occasional long shifts.

 

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:29 AM

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef.

 

His job:

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef at the BOON TAT Street BBQ Seafood kitchen which is part of the Singapore Flyer "street scene". His duties include a variety of OHS tasks, cleanliness of his kitchen (before, during and after his shift), safe operation of gas cookers, clean/healthy storage of raw foods and clean/healthy cooking. His limited knowledge of English made further interview difficult. He would, no doubt be well aware of the importance of these duties (as would anyone who has had food poisoning) as the Singapore authorities have an active kitchen/restaurant hygiene program that includes a "report poor hygiene" 1800 telephone number.

 

Conclusion and comments:

The kitchen seemed to be very clean and well organised, the food display seemed hygienic ---- and the BBQ-ed seafood and vegetables were delicious. It was a healthy kitchen to buy food from.

Job hazards include working with gas-fire, inflammable gases, ,hot metal woks and sharps (knives), working in a small cramped kitchen with several also busy co-workers and late night shifts.

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:52 AM

Ms JS is a Singapore tour-guide.

 

Her job:

Ms JS works for Singapore DUCK Tours which uses ex-military amphibious vehicles to tour the Singapore River and nearby city environs. In many ways JS’ job is similar to that of an air hostess. Apart from JS' key role as tour guide, she is the crew-member responsible for passenger safety. Before the vehicle leaves its land departure point, she briefs passengers on the two emergency exit points (one on each side), the exit procedure (don't go until instructed, and then go left and/or right as instructed) and the location (under seats) of life jackets. JS did not demonstrate wearing life-jackets; it was not clear whether that was her oversight or a company/systemic issue. JS also briefs that in an extreme emergency the captain might order "abandon DUCK", in which case passengers were to jump straight overboard. Finally JS points out to the various key safety signs that are displayed for passengers to read. During the tour the DUCK drives down a launch ramp into the river; this is done to create a big splash effect for passenger excitement. Immediately before this manoeuvre JS announces the need to remain seated and for passengers to securely hold onto children. Once the DUCK is in the river, JS cleans up any water-splash slip hazards. JS does a similar "hold tight" announcement for the river to land transfer. JS would also operate the DUCK's fire extinguishers if needed and throw life-buoys if someone were to fall overboard.


Conclusion & comments:

JS's main job is tour guide and she is a very entertaining and informative one. However she has an equally important role as safety attendant and she is fully aware of all that involves; her safety briefs were excellent, except that she did not demonstrate donning a life-jacket.

(When I complemented JS on her excellent tour brief and explained my CQU project, she seemed very nervous about providing her surname; she had previously introduced herself by her first name. Out of respect for JS' nervousness, I have “shopped” her photo and not identified her.)

Job hazards include exposure to sunlight (and the elements in general), slip/trip on the DUCK deck, falling overboard (on land or on water), and the DUCK sinking (very unlikely).

Rescooped by Paul Coulthard from Five Jobs -- OHS Aspects
Scoop.it!

JS

JS | Five Jobs -- OHS Aspects | Scoop.it
Paul Coulthard is on Scoop.it since Today, 11:04 AM
Paul Coulthard's insight:

Ms JS is a Singapore tour-guide.

 

Her job:

Ms JS works for Singapore DUCK Tours which uses ex-military amphibious vehicles to tour the Singapore River and nearby city environs. In many ways JS’ job is similar to that of an air hostess. Apart from JS' key role as tour guide, she is the crew-member responsible for passenger safety. Before the vehicle leaves its land departure point, she briefs passengers on the two emergency exit points (one on each side), the exit procedure (don't go until instructed, and then go left and/or right as instructed) and the location (under seats) of life jackets. JS did not demonstrate wearing life-jackets; it was not clear whether that was her oversight or a company/systemic issue. JS also briefs that in an extreme emergency the captain might order "abandon DUCK", in which case passengers were to jump straight overboard. Finally JS points out to the various key safety signs that are displayed for passengers to read. During the tour the DUCK drives down a launch ramp into the river; this is done to create a big splash effect for passenger excitement. Immediately before this manoeuvre JS announces the need to remain seated and for passengers to securely hold onto children. Once the DUCK is in the river, JS cleans up any water-splash slip hazards. JS does a similar "hold tight" announcement for the river to land transfer. JS would also operate the DUCK's fire extinguishers if needed and throw life-buoys if someone were to fall overboard.


Conclusion & comments:

JS's main job is tour guide and she is a very entertaining and informative one. However she has an equally important role as safety attendant and she is fully aware of all that involves; her safety briefs were excellent, except that she did not demonstrate donning a life-jacket.

(When I complemented JS on her excellent tour brief and explained my CQU project, she seemed very nervous about providing her surname; she had previously introduced herself by her first name. Out of respect for JS' nervousness, I have “shopped” her photo and not identified her.)

Job hazards include exposure to sunlight (and the elements in general), slip/trip on the DUCK deck, falling overboard (on land or on water), and the DUCK sinking (very unlikely).

more...
Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:25 AM

Mr Alvin Tan is a table-cleaner.

 

His job:

Alvin is a table-cleaner at the Singapore Flyer “street eats” dining area. He clears the used trays, plates and utensils (which will have come from any one of a dozen different kitchen stalls). He then scrupulously wipes the dining tables clean for the next diners. He is cheerful, friendly and talkative and takes great pride in his work. His tables are cleaner than those that would be found in similar dining areas in Australia.

 

Conclusion & comments:

Alvin's job is simple, low-skilled and probably lowly-paid, but it makes a big contribution to the health of the Singapore Flyer "street eats" diners. He would be well aware of his health responsibilities as such dining areas are regularly inspected by the Singapore authorities.

Job hazards include the health hazard associated with working with "used" food, "used" eating utensils and garbage bins, slip/trip hazards in the dining area, late night shifts and occasional long shifts.

 

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:29 AM

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef.

 

His job:

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef at the BOON TAT Street BBQ Seafood kitchen which is part of the Singapore Flyer "street scene". His duties include a variety of OHS tasks, cleanliness of his kitchen (before, during and after his shift), safe operation of gas cookers, clean/healthy storage of raw foods and clean/healthy cooking. His limited knowledge of English made further interview difficult. He would, no doubt be well aware of the importance of these duties (as would anyone who has had food poisoning) as the Singapore authorities have an active kitchen/restaurant hygiene program that includes a "report poor hygiene" 1800 telephone number.

 

Conclusion and comments:

The kitchen seemed to be very clean and well organised, the food display seemed hygienic ---- and the BBQ-ed seafood and vegetables were delicious. It was a healthy kitchen to buy food from.

Job hazards include working with gas-fire, inflammable gases, ,hot metal woks and sharps (knives), working in a small cramped kitchen with several also busy co-workers and late night shifts.

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:34 AM

Ms AG is an office receptionist.

 

Her job:

Ms AG works (in Australia) as an office receptionist for a business that does most of its work off-site. About seven other staff use that office as a work base. During her three months there AG has received no OH&S induction training or briefing. She is aware of the one exit for emergencies (the main entrance door) and that there are no other emergency exits. Her work desk and work area are ergonomically satisfactory. She reports that the "back office" area has a number of slip/trip hazards. AG has not been given any OHS duties. A colleague of AG’s suggested that she was overstating the slip/trip issue, but also mentioned a high staff turnover due to the stressfulness of some of the jobs.

 

Conclusion and comments:

This is far from satisfactory from a general OHS perspective or with regards to WHSA 2011. Quite understandably, AG would not agree to be photographed or to allow publication of her name.

Job hazards include long periods sitting working at a computer, the above-mentioned slip/trip hazards in the "back office", poor communication with her boss (and associated stress) and the lack of OH&S induction training.

Scooped by Paul Coulthard
Scoop.it!

Alvin Tan

Alvin Tan | Five Jobs -- OHS Aspects | Scoop.it
Paul Coulthard is on Scoop.it since Today, 11:04 AM
Paul Coulthard's insight:

Mr Alvin Tan is a table-cleaner.

 

His job:

Alvin is a table-cleaner at the Singapore Flyer “street eats” dining area. He clears the used trays, plates and utensils (which will have come from any one of a dozen different kitchen stalls). He then scrupulously wipes the dining tables clean for the next diners. He is cheerful, friendly and talkative and takes great pride in his work. His tables are cleaner than those that would be found in similar dining areas in Australia.

 

Conclusion & comments:

Alvin's job is simple, low-skilled and probably lowly-paid, but it makes a big contribution to the health of the Singapore Flyer "street eats" diners. He would be well aware of his health responsibilities as such dining areas are regularly inspected by the Singapore authorities.

Job hazards include the health hazard associated with working with "used" food, "used" eating utensils and garbage bins, slip/trip hazards in the dining area, late night shifts and occasional long shifts.

 

more...
Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:29 AM

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef.

 

His job:

Mr Kiry Chinej is a chef at the BOON TAT Street BBQ Seafood kitchen which is part of the Singapore Flyer "street scene". His duties include a variety of OHS tasks, cleanliness of his kitchen (before, during and after his shift), safe operation of gas cookers, clean/healthy storage of raw foods and clean/healthy cooking. His limited knowledge of English made further interview difficult. He would, no doubt be well aware of the importance of these duties (as would anyone who has had food poisoning) as the Singapore authorities have an active kitchen/restaurant hygiene program that includes a "report poor hygiene" 1800 telephone number.

 

Conclusion and comments:

The kitchen seemed to be very clean and well organised, the food display seemed hygienic ---- and the BBQ-ed seafood and vegetables were delicious. It was a healthy kitchen to buy food from.

Job hazards include working with gas-fire, inflammable gases, ,hot metal woks and sharps (knives), working in a small cramped kitchen with several also busy co-workers and late night shifts.

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:34 AM

Ms AG is an office receptionist.

 

Her job:

Ms AG works (in Australia) as an office receptionist for a business that does most of its work off-site. About seven other staff use that office as a work base. During her three months there AG has received no OH&S induction training or briefing. She is aware of the one exit for emergencies (the main entrance door) and that there are no other emergency exits. Her work desk and work area are ergonomically satisfactory. She reports that the "back office" area has a number of slip/trip hazards. AG has not been given any OHS duties. A colleague of AG’s suggested that she was overstating the slip/trip issue, but also mentioned a high staff turnover due to the stressfulness of some of the jobs.

 

Conclusion and comments:

This is far from satisfactory from a general OHS perspective or with regards to WHSA 2011. Quite understandably, AG would not agree to be photographed or to allow publication of her name.

Job hazards include long periods sitting working at a computer, the above-mentioned slip/trip hazards in the "back office", poor communication with her boss (and associated stress) and the lack of OH&S induction training.

Paul Coulthard's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:52 AM

Ms JS is a Singapore tour-guide.

 

Her job:

Ms JS works for Singapore DUCK Tours which uses ex-military amphibious vehicles to tour the Singapore River and nearby city environs. In many ways JS’ job is similar to that of an air hostess. Apart from JS' key role as tour guide, she is the crew-member responsible for passenger safety. Before the vehicle leaves its land departure point, she briefs passengers on the two emergency exit points (one on each side), the exit procedure (don't go until instructed, and then go left and/or right as instructed) and the location (under seats) of life jackets. JS did not demonstrate wearing life-jackets; it was not clear whether that was her oversight or a company/systemic issue. JS also briefs that in an extreme emergency the captain might order "abandon DUCK", in which case passengers were to jump straight overboard. Finally JS points out to the various key safety signs that are displayed for passengers to read. During the tour the DUCK drives down a launch ramp into the river; this is done to create a big splash effect for passenger excitement. Immediately before this manoeuvre JS announces the need to remain seated and for passengers to securely hold onto children. Once the DUCK is in the river, JS cleans up any water-splash slip hazards. JS does a similar "hold tight" announcement for the river to land transfer. JS would also operate the DUCK's fire extinguishers if needed and throw life-buoys if someone were to fall overboard.


Conclusion & comments:

JS's main job is tour guide and she is a very entertaining and informative one. However she has an equally important role as safety attendant and she is fully aware of all that involves; her safety briefs were excellent, except that she did not demonstrate donning a life-jacket.

(When I complemented JS on her excellent tour brief and explained my CQU project, she seemed very nervous about providing her surname; she had previously introduced herself by her first name. Out of respect for JS' nervousness, I have “shopped” her photo and not identified her.)

Job hazards include exposure to sunlight (and the elements in general), slip/trip on the DUCK deck, falling overboard (on land or on water), and the DUCK sinking (very unlikely).