Fishing in the United States and in Canada
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59% of the 'Tuna' Americans Eat Is Not Tuna

59% of the 'Tuna' Americans Eat Is Not Tuna | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it
Nonprofit ocean protection group Oceana took 1,215 samples of fish from across the United States and genetically tested them in order to bring us the following astonishing facts

Via Nigel Dawson, Frank Kusters
Kayla Langstraat's insight:

59% of the tuna Americans eat is not actually tuna. A nonprofit ocean protection group, Oceana took 1215 samples of fish from across the United States and tested the sample. They found that 18% of tuna found in gorciery stores are mislabeld, 38% of tuna found in resturants is mislabled and 74% of tuna found in sushi venues is mislabled. I think that we need to be more careful with what we import and make sure that we are feeding the United Sates citizens healthy food that is what they say it is.

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Diana Romero's comment, October 3, 2013 9:16 PM
I concur that the U.S should be more careful when importing foods. If things are mislabeled, we may be dubious to what we are actually eating, thinking it would be healthy but can't do anything to prevent from eating something we may not be sure of.
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Fish deformities linked to oil pollution in U.S. and Alberta - Canada - CBC News

Fish deformities linked to oil pollution in U.S. and Alberta - Canada - CBC News | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it
A renowned Alberta water scientist is urging the federal government to take action after he discovered deformities in fish in the Athabasca River downriver from oil sands developments bear a striking resemblance to ones found in fish after spills...

Via Robert DesJarlait
Kayla Langstraat's insight:

This article talks about how oil pollution in fish habitats can cause deformations of the fish living in the water. Scientists are trying to get the federal government to take action. The deformations in the fish found in the Athabasca River are similar to the deformations of fish found in the waters after oil spills in the United States. I think this is an important topic because the fish are part of the envirment and they help the economy of Canada. The fish could be contaminated and when people catch them and eat them they could get sick. If the oil in the fish causes them to die, Canada looses one of its main exports, and less people will go there to fish. It would hurt Canada's economy if the government doesn't step in and help.

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Iloria Phoenix's comment, October 3, 2013 9:22 AM
I agree that the government needs to take on the situation and help prevent deformations in the fish. If they do not its sounds like there will be an ongoing negative situation for Canada
Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 7:52 PM
The government should step in to provide some funding, but not get in the way of groups that will actually be doing the clean ups. The deformities in fish will pass with time as the oil gets cleared up. The best way to solve the problem is get the oil filtered out, then worry about the fish.
Molly Kellar's comment, October 4, 2013 1:10 AM
I think that they should do something to clean up the oil spills. There are so many bad things that could happen and it could definitely effect the life in the water.
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Fish Populations in the United States Rebound » The Daily Catch

Fish Populations in the United States Rebound » The Daily Catch | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it

Via Kathy Dowsett
Kayla Langstraat's insight:

Fish populations were going down so they set a limit on how many of which kinds of fish you can catch. This law was passed in 1996 and since then the fish populations have been rebounding. 21 of the 44 speices has gone up in population. I think the law was a good thing because I enjoy fishing and if someday there were no fish left to fish that would be sad. Letting the fish populations go back up is good but if they take the regulations off then the population will go back down. I think the law should be perminant.

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Seth Meinders's comment, October 1, 2013 9:43 AM
I think this law is good because it preserves fish to fish as well as export. Lots of people take their sons or daughters or grandkids fishing. If fish were ever to go extinct or run out, this would affect the food chain. The animals that eat the fish or rely on the fish to survive would not be able to depend on the fish. They would have to find a new way to survive and if they can't, then their population will also decrease.
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UNITED STATES: Study finds unsafe mercury levels in 84 percent of all fish

UNITED STATES: Study finds unsafe mercury levels in 84 percent of all fish | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it

NEW YORK -- A new study from the Biodiversity Research Institute in Maine found that 84 percent of fish have unsafe levels of mercury. That poses a health risk for humans, exceeding the guidelines for eating certain kinds of fish more than once a month.

 

Reducing mercury pollution is on the agenda of the United Nations conference this week in Geneva, where delegations are expected to put the finishing touches on a treaty backed by the United States.

 

Richard Gelfond always considered himself athletic, until one day, something went very wrong.

 

"I went running, and it felt like I was going to fall over," said Gelfond, adding it had something to do with his balance.

 

Gelfond, who is the CEO of the movie company IMAX, consulted doctors on both coasts. They had no answers. He was worried.

 

"It got to the point where I really couldn't cross the street. I had to hold my wife's hand," Gelfond said.

 

Many tests later, a neurologist asked Gelfond if he ate a lot of fish. He did, twice a day. The diagnosis was mercury poisoning.

 

"I thought I was doing something really good for my body, and it turned out I was doing something really bad for my body," Gelfond said.

 

Eating fish is the principal way people get mercury poisoning. Tuna and swordfish contain the most mercury, which can permanently damage the brain and kidneys. Because mercury pollution is global, no country alone can rid its food supply of contamination.

 

"Seventy-five percent of the fish we eat in the United States is imported," said Linda Greer with the National Resources Defense Council.

 

Greer's environmental group supports the U.N. treaty to reduce worldwide emissions of mercury.

 

"Many of the tuna fish we eat, for example, swim in the South China Sea, and that's mercury pollution that comes into cans and into our pantries every day," Greer said.

 

The proposed U.N. treaty calls for: filtering mercury emissions out of burning coal; cutting mercury use in gold mining; reducing its use in manufacturing of electronic switches and batteries.

 

"I am still probably only 75 percent of what I was before," Gelfond said. "I can't run, for example. I assume I am never going to be able to do the things I did before."

 

Gelfond has endowed a university research facility to study the effects of mercury on human health, effects which for him may be permanent.

 

Kayla Langstraat's insight:

This article talks about the problem with mercury pollution. Murcury is found in a lot of fish, more commonly, in swordfish and tuna. Murcury poisoning to humans can cause perminant brain and kidney damage. 75% of the worlds fish is imported so one country alone can't stop the pollution. The proposed U.N. treaty says that we should filter murcury out of buring coal. The U.S. supports this treaty.

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Iloria Phoenix's comment, October 3, 2013 9:35 AM
I think that this is shocking people who eat fish daily could be poisoned from the mercury in our tuna and sword fish. I am glad that our government supports the treaty to filter mercury.
Diana Romero's comment, October 3, 2013 9:20 PM
I am in favor that the government is trying to stop this, but I am also worrisome because I mostly eat fish. It isn't a bright idea to try and dispose harmful substances in our foods.
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Fishery Collapse can be Prevented with Early Warning System

Fishery Collapse can be Prevented with Early Warning System | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it
US - Threats from overfishing can be detected early enough to save fisheries and livelihoods, with minimal adjustments in harvesting practices, a new study by researchers in the University of Minnesota's College of Biological Sciences shows.

Via Aquaculturedirectory
Kayla Langstraat's insight:

This article talks about how overfishing is an issue in the United States. A researcher did a study and discovered that overfising can be detected early enough to prevent population from decreasing and what harvesting practices can be used to prevent overfishing. Their new methods are designed to detect future threats and put an end to the problem before it becomes too serious. Their data identifies the conditions that would eventually cause the population of fish to decline. The data includes estamates of relative population size, catch rates and growth rates of different fish populations.

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CANADA: Announces Strong Fish and Seafood Exports Data in 2012

CANADA: Announces Strong Fish and Seafood Exports Data in 2012 | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it

Ottawa, Ontario – The Honourable Keith Ashfield, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, today released the 2012 trade figures for Canada’s exports of fish and seafood products. Canada exported $4.14 billion in fish and seafood products in 2012, an increase of $41 million from 2011.

 

“Fish and seafood is one of the largest single food commodities exported by Canada. The strong exports in 2012 demonstrate the trust consumers place in our fish and seafood products worldwide,” said Minister Ashfield. “The sector currently employs approximately 80,000 Canadians who are involved in commercial fishing, aquaculture and processing activities. We are proud of this industry and will continue to support it.”

 

"Our fisheries and aquaculture operations are managed in a responsible and sustainable manner to ensure economic benefits for current and future generations. Canadian fish and seafood products are among the best in the world," added Minister Ashfield.

 

Canada exported fish and seafood products to 118 countries last year, with approximately 62 percent of those exports destined for the United States at a value of $2.6 billion. The People’s Republic of China and the European Union are also significant markets, importing more than $439 million and $343 million worth of Canadian fish and seafood products respectively in 2012. Canada’s largest exports by value were lobster, snow/queen crab, Atlantic salmon, and shrimp. In 2012, these species accounted for 48 percent (284 tonnes) of all fish and seafood exports by volume and 61 percent ($2.5 billion) of the total value of exports.

 

This weekend (March 9-12), Minister Ashfield will participate at the International Boston Seafood Show,  North America’s largest fish and seafood trade show.  The Department is attending the tradeshow to support Canada’s fisheries and aquaculture industries, and as part of the Government of Canada’s coordinated effort to showcase Canada’s commitment to sustainability.

 

Gerald Keddy, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade, for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and for the Atlantic Gateway, will also attend the Boston Seafood Show. He will meet with Canadian stakeholders and highlight the benefits a Canada-EU trade agreement would bring to Canada’s fish and seafood industry.

 

“With its world-class fish and seafood industry, Canada stands to benefit greatly from a Canada‑EU trade agreement,” said Parliamentary Secretary Keddy. “Canada has a historic opportunity to gain preferential access to the European Union, a 500 million consumer market and the world’s largest importer of fish and seafood, importing an average of $25 billion annually. This will in turn create jobs and long-term prosperity for hard-working Canadians across the country.”

 

Canada’s fish and seafood exports to the EU were worth $404 million in 2012. These exports currently face average EU tariffs of 11 percent, with peaks up to 25 percent. Once implemented, a Canada-EU trade deal would immediately eliminate EU tariffs on most fish and seafood products.

 

"Our Government remains focused on four priorities, as outlined by the Prime Minister, that Canadians care most about: their families, their safety, their pride in being a citizen of this country, and of course, their personal financial security," concluded Minister Ashfield.

 

For more information about Canadian fish and seafood exports and other useful statistics, consult the backgrounder Provincial and Territorial Statistics on Canada’s Fish and Seafood Exports in 2012 on the Fisheries and Oceans website or visit http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/stats/stats-eng.htm.

 

Read more about Canada’s commitment to sustainability in our wild capture fishery and aquaculture sectors at www.sustainable-seafood.ca

 

 

Kayla Langstraat's insight:

Fish are one of Canada's major exports. They make billions of dollars from it and that number rises every year. The fishing industry in Canada also provides jobs for a lot of people. Fishing is a really important part of Canadian life because it helps their economy, without it their economy wouldn't be as good they would have less jobs, food, and income from exports. Fishing in Canada also brings in tourists. Many people pay quite a bit to go on fishing trips in Canada, so that helps their economy too.

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59% of the 'Tuna' Americans Eat Is Not Tuna

59% of the 'Tuna' Americans Eat Is Not Tuna | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it
Nonprofit ocean protection group Oceana took 1,215 samples of fish from across the United States and genetically tested them in order to bring us the following astonishing facts

Via Nigel Dawson, Frank Kusters
Kayla Langstraat's insight:

59% of the tuna Americans eat is not actually tuna. A nonprofit ocean protection group, Oceana took 1215 samples of fish from across the United States and tested the sample. They found that 18% of tuna found in gorciery stores are mislabeld, 38% of tuna found in resturants is mislabled and 74% of tuna found in sushi venues is mislabled. I think that we need to be more careful with what we import and make sure that we are feeding the United Sates citizens healthy food that is what they say it is.

more...
Diana Romero's comment, October 3, 2013 9:16 PM
I concur that the U.S should be more careful when importing foods. If things are mislabeled, we may be dubious to what we are actually eating, thinking it would be healthy but can't do anything to prevent from eating something we may not be sure of.
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CANADA: Harper Government Invests in Aquaculture in Middlesex County

CANADA: Harper Government Invests in Aquaculture in Middlesex County | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it

Thames Centre, Ontario, October 12, 2012 - The Harper Government is helping convert a former mushroom plant in Thames Centre to a state-of-the-art fish farm. The project was announced today by Member of Parliament for Elgin-Middlesex-London, Joe Preston, on behalf of Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Keith Ashfield and Minister of State for Science and Technology Gary Goodyear.

 

"By investing in projects like this, our Government is helping build a brighter future for rural communities in southern Ontario," Preston said. "This project will boost our economy by creating local jobs and enhancing our domestic fish farming industry,"

 

With this investment of more than $1.4 million, Sand Plains Aquaculture will produce Canadian-farmed Tilapia for consumption in the Toronto market. Currently, all live Tilapia consumed in the Toronto market is imported directly from the United States. The first phase of the project will enable the company to raise over half a million pounds of Tilapia for this market and will create a minimum of 10 full-time jobs. Another 20 jobs will be created when the operation is in full steam.

 

This $5-million project received a $1-million repayable loan investment from Agriculture Canada's Sand Plains Community Development Fund, a $415,000 contribution from Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Aquaculture Innovation and Market Access Program, and a $20,000 investment and technical assistance from the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program.

 

Sand Plains Aquaculture is excited to be the first land-based recirculating Tilapia farm in Ontario," says co-owner Ewart McLaughlin. "We are very pleased with the contributions from all of our partners. We have a great team that has worked hard to bring this project to fruition."

 

In its first year, the business anticipates sales of $1 million, which will rise to more than $10 million when fully functional. This business will also create opportunities for further food processing such as fillets and value-added items.

 

The Sand Plains Community Development Fund is administered by the Ontario Association of Community Futures Development Corporations. The Fund targets community-based initiatives that support regional development, attract and retain people and investment, and stimulate business development and job creation.

 

For more information on the Sand Plains Community Development Fund, please visit www.ontcfdc.com or www.sandplains.ca.

 

Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Aquaculture Innovation and Market Access Program leverages investment from the private sector to improve the competitiveness, innovation, management and environmental performance of the Canadian aquaculture industry. Since 2008, the Program has allocated $23.4 million of funding to innovative aquaculture projects across the country.

 

For more information on the Aquaculture Innovation and Market Access Program, please visit www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca.

 

The National Research Council-Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP) provides financial support to qualified small and medium-sized enterprises in Canada to help them undertake technology innovation.

 

For more information on NRC-IRAP, please visit www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca.

 

For more information, media may contact:

Relations avec les médias
Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Ottawa (Ontario)
613-773-7972
1-866-345-7972

 

Jeff English
Attaché de presse
Cabinet de l'honorable Gerry Ritz
613-773-1059

 

Diana Jedig
Executive Director
Ontario Association of Community Futures Development Corporations
866-668-2332

Kayla Langstraat's insight:

In Canada they are building fish farms to help keep the populations of fish up. This will help fish population because fish in a fish farm are in a safe enviroment where they can be not as easily killed. They are building these fish farms in rural communities in hope ito build a brighter future. They built one in Ontario last year cost 1.4 million dollars. They cost a lot to build but they also give people jobs, which helps our economy.

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Types of Fish in Canada | Fish & Tips

Types of Fish in Canada | Fish & Tips | Fishing in the United States and in Canada | Scoop.it

Fishing in Canada is a wonderful way to spend some free time. Canada has some of the most beautiful natural surroundings in the world. And for the true fisherman, some of the best fishing for sport around as well.


Via Hessie Jones
Kayla Langstraat's insight:

This aritcle is a helpful article because if someone were thinking about going to Canada to go fishing, this would help them know what kinds of fish they might catch. It tells you how much of a fight the fish will give once you catch it. It also tells you what the natives favorites are and what kinds of fish would be kinds that you would want to go show off to friends, such as the Pike. It tells you that if you want to catch a Pike, you would want to go to Northern Canada, and that you  would want to go to Canada in early spring for the best chance of catching one. This article also tells you that Bass, Salmon, Trout, Catfish, Sunfish, and Walleye are fresh water fish so you know where to go looking for them.

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Mallory Wheeler's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:12 PM

This information is awesome if you are going to Canada and want to fish. You know exactly what to expect and hope for!