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BIG DATA: What Your IT Team Wants You To Know

BIG DATA: What Your IT Team Wants You To Know | Collaboration | Scoop.it

The purpose of Big Data is to supply companies with actionable information on any variety of aspects. But this is proving to be far more difficult than it looks with over half of Big Data projects left uncompleted.


Two of the most often reported reasons for project failures are a lack of expertise in data analysis. Reports show that data processing, management and analysis are all difficult in any phase of the project, with IT teams citing each of those reasons more than 40% of the time.

 

However, failures in Big Data projects may not solely lie on faulty project management. In a recent survey, a staggering 80% of Big Data’s biggest challenges are from a lack of appropriate talent. The field’s relative infancy is making it hard to find the necessary staff to see projects through, resulting in underutilized data and missed project goals.

 

IT teams are quickly recognizing a chasm between executives and frontline staffers whose job it is to apply findings from Big Data. In the end,it may not be the anticipated cure-all for 21st century business management. It is only as good as good as the system that runs it.


Via Peter Azzopardi, Berend de Jonge, Lauren Moss
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Olivier Vandelaer's curator insight, January 30, 2013 2:45 AM

Looking at the infographic, it clearly reminds me about the start of "Enterprise Data Warehouse": failures by "Innacurate scope", "Technical Roadblocks" & "Siloed data and no collaboration". It looks so familiar.

Tony Agresta's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:15 AM

Very interesting infographic.  Why do they fail?  For all of the reasons above and then some...    Over 80% of the data being collected today is unstructured and not readily stored in relational database technology burdened by complex extract, transform and load.  There's also pre-existing data, sometimes referred to as "dark data" that includes documents which need to be included and made discoverable for a host of reasons - compliance and regulatory issues are one.   Log activity and e-mail traffic used to detect cyber threats and mitigate risk through analysis of file transfers is yet another set of data that requires immediate attention.

 

Social and mobile are clearly channels that need to be addressed as organizations continue to mine data from the open web in support of CRM, product alerts, real time advertising options and more.  

 

To accomplish all of this, organizations need a platform with enterprise hardened technology that can ingest all of these forms of data in real time, without having to write complex schemas.   Getting back to the point - What do most projects fail?   If companies attempt to do this with technology that is not reliable, not durable and does not leverage the skills of their existing development organization, the project will fail.  

 

We have seen this time and time again.   MarkLogic to the rescue.   With over 350 customers and 500 big data applications, our Enterprise NoSQL approach mitigates the risk.  Why?  Our technology stack includes connectors to Hadoop, integration with leading analytics tools using SQL, Java and Rest APIs, JSON support, real time data ingestion, the ability to handle any form of data, alerting, in database analytics functions, high availability, replication, security and a lot more.  

 

When you match this technology with a world-class services organization with proven implementation skills, we can guarantee your next Big Data project will work.  We have done it hundreds of times with the largest companies in the world and very, very big data.

 

www.marklogic.com



Adrian Carr's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:27 AM

This is a great infographic - it shows that whilst everyone is doing it (it being "Big Data" - whatever that is...), talent is rare, technology is hard to find and the projects never end.  A far cry from the speed with which companies such as the BBC deployed MarkLogic to serve all data for the sport websites through the Olympics.  Now that was big data, delivered by a talented team in a short space of time.

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Building Real Collaboration into Your Organization

Building Real Collaboration into Your Organization | Collaboration | Scoop.it

How focusing on the three organizational pillars of culture, people, and leadership can help fuel meaningful collaboration.

 

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How to Capture Value from Collaboration, Especially If You’re Skeptical About It

How to Capture Value from Collaboration, Especially If You’re Skeptical About It | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Understanding what collaboration is and isn't a crucial part of getting better at it. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Many of today’s most important challenges are so complex and multifaceted that they can only be tackled by teams of experts from disparate domains. To solve them, professionals must be able to harness ideas, people, and resources from across disciplinary and organizational boundaries.

 

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We Have Not Failed, We Have Learnt

We Have Not Failed, We Have Learnt | Collaboration | Scoop.it

After 10 years exploring the world, growing through unusual jobs, connecting deeply with strangers, I experienced a cultural shock when I joined a large, old, scientific company. First, I tried to cope. Then, I tried to change a few things.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Celine Schillinger's talk at Business Innovation Factory Summit 2016. Celine talks about change agency, community engagement and courage.

 

You should follow Celine on Twitter here

  

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Why Diverse Teams Are Smarter

Why Diverse Teams Are Smarter | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Diverse teams are more likely to constantly reexamine facts and remain objective. They may also encourage greater scrutiny of each member’s actions, keeping their joint cognitive resources sharp and vigilant.

 

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Six Spaces Required for Effective Collaboration

Six Spaces Required for Effective Collaboration | Collaboration | Scoop.it

What makes collaboration work? The first thought probably centers on the workplace design. Many articles have been written and offices showcased on how space can help facilitate conversations and give people the flexibility to solve problems together.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Designing the right space for champion-level collaboration is important for productivity and meaningful results. Here are 6 spaces for effective collaboration.

 

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, September 8, 2016 12:11 PM

Some excellent insights on collaboration worth reviewing.

Alex's curator insight, September 13, 2016 1:12 AM
interesting take on the different 'spaces' required for making collaboration work in companies
Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, January 28, 4:56 AM
Planning for the future in middle years geog.
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Solving Complex Social Problems Through Collaboration

Solving Complex Social Problems Through Collaboration | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Collaboration is often talked about, but much less often done, and far less often done well. 

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Lessons of collaboration from Geneva Global, a philanthropic consulting firm that specialises in international development.

 

 

 

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 3, 2016 7:58 PM

I  am all about collaboration so do you think it can work?

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What Google Learned From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team

What Google Learned From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team | Collaboration | Scoop.it

New research reveals surprising truths about why some work groups thrive and others falter.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Project Aristotle is a reminder that when companies try to optimize everything, it’s sometimes easy to forget that success is often built on experiences — like emotional interactions and complicated conversations and discussions of who we want to be and how our teammates make us feel — that can’t really be optimized.

 

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Google's Surprising Discovery About Effective Teams

Google's Surprising Discovery About Effective Teams | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Pod. Work group. Committee. Autonomous collective. Whatever you call it, you’re part of one at Google and probably wherever you work: a team. So if we know what makes managers great, why don’t we know what makes a team great?

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

There are five key dynamics that set successful teams apart from other teams at Google:

 

  1. Psychological safety: Can we take risks on this team without feeling insecure or embarrassed?
  2. Dependability: Can we count on each other to do high quality work on time? 
  3. Structure & clarity: Are goals, roles, and execution plans on our team clear? 
  4. Meaning of work: Are we working on something that is personally important for each of us?
  5. Impact of work: Do we fundamentally believe that the work we’re doing matters?
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How to Manage for Collective Creativity

How to Manage for Collective Creativity | Collaboration | Scoop.it

What's the secret to unlocking the creativity hidden inside your daily work, and giving every great idea a chance?

 

Harvard professor Linda Hill, co-author of "Collective Genius," has studied some of the world's most creative companies to come up with a set of tools and tactics to keep great ideas flowing - from everyone in the company, not just the designated "creatives."

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Innovation is a journey, a collaborative problem-solving process—most often among people with diverse perspectives and expertise. And very rarely are innovations developed full blown; rather, they are created through a process of trial and error, false starts, missteps, and even mistakes. 

 

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Why Organizations Fail

Why Organizations Fail | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Most organizations are highly efficient at specific tasks, but often fail when presented with a problem they weren’t designed for.

The truth is that the real world defies engineering and logic. Perhaps that’s one reason why human life expectancy is roughly 80 years and increasing, while corporate life expectancy is now less than 20 years and shrinking.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The truth is that the real world defies engineering and logic. Perhaps that’s one reason why human life expectancy is roughly 80 years and increasing, while corporate life expectancy is now less than 20 years and shrinking.

 

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Is Your Company Encouraging Employees to Share What They Know?

Is Your Company Encouraging Employees to Share What They Know? | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Many of the things we need to know to be successful – to innovate, collaborate, solve problems, and identify new opportunities – aren’t learned simply through schooling, training, or personal experience.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Analyst estimates suggest that the companies in the Fortune 500 still lose a combined $31.5 billion per year from employees failing to share knowledge effectively. By trying to recreate the wheel, repeating others’ mistakes, or wasting time searching for specialized information or expertise, employees incur productivity costs and opportunity costs for the organization.


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David Hain's curator insight, December 2, 2015 6:36 AM

Where are the knowledge flows in your organisation? Are they comprehensive and open to all?

donhornsby's curator insight, December 2, 2015 7:57 AM

(From the article): Leaders tend to place a disproportionate emphasis on tools like training materials or knowledge portals partly because they are easier to manage and control. It is less clear how to manage amorphous, interactive learning processes; you can’t simply force coworkers to interact and share experiences. However, more often than not, leaders simply need to remove obstacles that discourage people from seeking or sharing knowledge and learning vicariously. They can create a structure that allows these interactions to take place organically by focusing on three steps: (see article for the three steps)

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How To Create An Environment Of Collaboration

How To Create An Environment Of Collaboration | Collaboration | Scoop.it

That slacker worker? He or she might be making your other employees less productive, especially if they’re working together on a project. In fact, collaboration can lead to reduced motivation and a loss of productivity if group members don’t contribute equally, according to a recent study published in Translational Issues in Psychological Science.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Stop focusing on getting everyone to participate equally, and start recognizing individual contributions.


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Stephen Dale's curator insight, October 6, 2015 4:50 AM

When will organisations finally accept there isn't a recipe for collaboration? Better to focus on giving compelling answers to "what's in it for me?". 

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When Everyone Is Doing Design Thinking, Is It Still a Competitive Advantage?

When Everyone Is Doing Design Thinking, Is It Still a Competitive Advantage? | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Now that design thinking is everywhere, it’s tempting to simply declare it dead—to ordain something new in its place. It’s a methodology always in pursuit of unforeseen innovation, so reinventing itself might seem like the smart way forward. But in practice, design thinking is a set of tools that can grow old with us.

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Who Are You Collaborating With? Chances Are, She Is Just Like You

Who Are You Collaborating With? Chances Are, She Is Just Like You | Collaboration | Scoop.it

People always prefer to collaborate with people that are just like themselves. Maybe they share the same educational background, the same age, the same hobby, or maybe they just joined the company within the same period. Always the same tendency.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

A fine blog post by Jeppe Vilstrup Hansgaard from Innovisor. 


The research got cited in Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and other well-known business media. Even Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook cited the research in her book LEAN IN (page 153).


See also here: http://blogs.wsj.com/atwork/2012/06/04/picking-someone-for-a-project-chances-are-hell-look-like-you


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Ralph Herrera's curator insight, October 14, 2015 9:57 PM

The importance to find collaborative groups with diversity.  The article speaks of how we tend to collaborate with our same gender group.  

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Collaborating Well in Large Global Teams

Collaborating Well in Large Global Teams | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Professional service firms seeking to help companies navigate the demands of globalization face a tough challenge because advisers with the specialized expertise needed to address sophisticated issues are most often distributed throughout the firm and around the globe. This makes collaboration difficult.


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What Apple, Lending Club, and AirBnB Know About Collaborating with Customers

What Apple, Lending Club, and AirBnB Know About Collaborating with Customers | Collaboration | Scoop.it

The idea of “co-creating” with customers has been circulating for years, but until recently few companies effectively exploited its power or understood its contribution to the bottom line.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Giving up control, and sharing rewards, may seem terribly risky, but it is the key to the co-creative business models that generate unprecedented value with lower marginal costs, and greater profits.


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How IT and the Role of the CIO is Changing in the Era of Networked Organizations

How IT and the Role of the CIO is Changing in the Era of Networked Organizations | Collaboration | Scoop.it

It’s become clear that the contemporary IT organization — at least ones that are successfully leading their organizations into the future — is now wielding a new kind of power.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The CIO has an absolutely key role to play today, and can be a leader or a follower as the business has to move now and seize opportunity in today’s challenging markets.


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Guess Who Doesn’t Fit In at Work

Guess Who Doesn’t Fit In at Work | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Across cultures and industries, managers strongly prize “cultural fit” — the idea that the best employees are like-minded. One recent survey found that more than 80 percent of employers worldwide named cultural fit as a top hiring priority.


When done carefully, selecting new workers this way can make organizations more productive and profitable. But cultural fit has morphed into a far more nebulous and potentially dangerous concept. It has shifted from systematic analysis of who will thrive in a given workplace to snap judgments by managers about who they’d rather hang out with.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Beware hiring on cultural fit: it's "a new form of discrimination," research suggests. Recruiters for top firms often define merit in their own image.


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How to Fuel Collaboration & Innovation

How to Fuel Collaboration & Innovation | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Wil Reynolds, Heidi Grant Halvorson, and Clive Wilkinson share actionable insights at the 2015 99U Conference.

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Cooperation Is What Makes Us Human

Cooperation Is What Makes Us Human | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Want to know what makes us stand apart from our ape cousins?


Cooperation—no other animal does it quite like us. Developmental psychologist Michael Tomasello explains why if chimps had a self-help bestseller, it would be titled, How to Outwit Rivals and Get More Fruit.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

What stands out is our exceptional capacity for generosity and mutual trust, those moments in which we act like no species that has ever come before us.


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Anne Landreat's curator insight, April 28, 2015 3:56 AM

2 million years ago, as climate swings altered the availability and competition for food, our ancestors were forced to put their heads together to survive. (...)

Human cooperation requires two or more people to have insight into each other’s intentions, formulate a joint goal, assume specific roles, and then coordinate their efforts. (...)

Ultimately, Tomasello’s research on human nature arrives at a paradox: our minds are the product of competitive intelligence and cooperative wisdom, our behavior a blend of brotherly love and hostility toward out-groups. Confronted by this paradox, the ugly side—the fact that humans compete, fight, and kill each other in wars—dismays most people, Tomasello says. And he agrees that our tendency to distrust outsiders—lending itself to prejudice, violence, and hate—should not be discounted or underestimated. But he says he is optimistic. In the end, what stands out more is our exceptional capacity for generosity and mutual trust, those moments in which we act like no species that has ever come before us.

 

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There’s a Difference Between Cooperation and Collaboration

There’s a Difference Between Cooperation and Collaboration | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Everyone seems to agree that collaboration across functions is critical for major projects and initiatives. The reality, however, is that meshing the skills and resources of different departments, each focused on its own distinct targets, to achieve a larger organizational goal is much easier said than done. 


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Stephen Dale's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:18 AM

The message here is, not to confuse pleasant, cooperative behaviour with collaboration. The latter requires commitment to a common goal.

Ralph Herrera's curator insight, October 14, 2015 10:04 PM

There are simple rules to follow for collaboration.  This article addresses the difference and provides a couple of ideas to make collaboration work.

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Collaborating Online Is Sometimes Better than Face-to-Face

Collaborating Online Is Sometimes Better than Face-to-Face | Collaboration | Scoop.it

If you’re embracing online collaboration as a necessary evil — the only way to work with an increasingly dispersed team of global or remote workers, for example — then you’re doing it wrong. Online collaboration is not a second-best substitute for face-to-face work: It’s a complement with its own perks and benefits.


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Stephen Dale's curator insight, April 3, 2015 6:06 AM

One benefit of online collaboration is the ability to accommodate a wider range of communication and working styles. If you’re the kind of person who always speaks up in meetings (guilty as charged), the traditional workplace may work just great for you. But you’re missing out on the perspective and talents of people who like to mull on a problem before contributing, or that of people who communicate better visually or in writing than they do out loud.


Reading time:5mins

Ralph Herrera's curator insight, October 14, 2015 10:06 PM

Collaborating online can be a pathway to success.  Distance and time make online collaboration a highly sought after remedy.  

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Building a Collaborative Enterprise

Building a Collaborative Enterprise | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Collaborative communities encourage people to continually apply their unique talents to group projects—and to become motivated by a collective mission, not just personal gain or the intrinsic pleasures of autonomous creativity. By marrying a sense of common purpose to a supportive structure, organizations are mobilizing knowledge workers’ talents and expertise in flexible, highly manageable group-work efforts. The approach fosters not only innovation and agility but also efficiency and scalability.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Four keys to creating a culture of trust and teamwork. 


One of the principles mentioned in this article is shared purpose


In focusing on a shared purpose collaborative communities seek a basis for trust and organizational cohesion that is more robust than self-interest. 


A shared purpose is not the verbiage on a poster or in a document, and it doesn’t come via charismatic leaders’ pronouncements. It is multidimensional, practical, and constantly enriched in debates about concrete problems.


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Level343's comment, April 3, 2015 2:00 PM
Kenneth Mikkelsen agree :)
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Why do we cooperate?

Why do we cooperate? | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Why do people cooperate?


This isn’t a question anyone seriously asks. The answer is obvious: we cooperate because doing so is usually synergistic. It creates more benefit for less cost and makes our lives easier and better.


Maybe it’s better to ask why don’t people always cooperate. But the answer here seems obvious too. We don’t do so if we think we can get away with it. If we can save ourselves the effort of working with someone else but still gain the benefits of others’ cooperation. And, perhaps, we withhold cooperation as punishment for others’ past refusal to collaborate with us.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Since there are good reasons to cooperate – and good reasons not to do so – we are left with a question without an obvious answer: under what conditions will people cooperate?


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SENAME Interactive's comment, March 27, 2015 4:46 AM
I think people cooperate for mutual benefits. As you said they can do more when they are united. It also depends on other factors such as their circumstances, the way they grew up and more..
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Collaboration, from the Wright Brothers to Robots

Collaboration, from the Wright Brothers to Robots | Collaboration | Scoop.it

Watson and Crick. Braque and Picasso. The Wright Brothers. Wozniak and Jobs … and Jony Ive. Great collaborations all. Transformative. But what really made them work? How did collaborative relationships so ingeniously amplify individual talent and impact? Was there a secret to success?


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Work has changed, and so has how we work together.


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Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Thinker ★ Speaker ★ Writer ★ Leadership Adviser ★ Learning Designer ★ Neo-Generalist

Kenneth Mikkelsen is co-founder of FutureShifts. He helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in society by cultivating the skills, mindsets, behaviours and organisational systems needed to succeed in times of change.