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'OK Glass, Save A Life.' The Application Of Google Glass In Sudden Cardiac Death

'OK Glass, Save A Life.' The Application Of Google Glass In Sudden Cardiac Death | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Google Glass has made its way into healthcare.  Its use in the operating room and in medical education has been profiled here.  Yet the magic of Glass will be found in the applications that can make this “technology” into real-world solutions for health and medicine.  It’s a bit like the smart phone and how its realization is a function of the countless apps that bring the device to life.

Inside The Operating Room

Christian Assad, MD has taken the next step with Glass and developing a practical app that can turn Glass into a real life-saver. He recently profiles this application on his blog and I believe it’s an important turn of events that showcase just how technology can be applied to medicine and public health issues.  Here’s how it presents the concept in his blog–Google Glass and augmented CPR:

THE CPRGLASS SCENARIO

1)   Person walking, witnesses someone passing out (syncope)

2)   Individual says “OK GLASS, CPRGLASS”
A) Instructions appear ABC (Assess Airway, Breathing and Circulation)
B) “OK GLASS, No Pulse!”      (An algorithm developed by Hao-Yu Wu et al at MIT demonstrate how a normal camera can detect a pulse in a person with strong accuracy.) We are looking incorporate such algorithm aka (which will be open source) ”Eulerian video magnification” to CPRGLASS for 2 reasons;
                           1) Will help as an innovative method to assess if the compressions are adequate
                           2) Will be able to tell us if patient has regained pulse if we stop compressions, possibly, instead of even having to look for a pulse


3)   This triggers the following algorithm
A) Staying Alive Music starts which will guide you to do the compressions at a rate of 100/min.
B) Gyroscope tells you if compressions are adequate enough by moving
C) Tracks TIME of CPR initiation and number of compressions given
D) Calls 911 with your GPS based location
E) Via GPS will try to find nearest AED which information is being obtained by crowdsourcing. Ex AED4US
F) Sends Txt Msg to nearest hospital with information regarding ungoing CPR for them to get prepared

Dr. Assad combines science, technology and popular culture to create a platform that is as simple as it is important.  From the scientific underpinning to the driving musical beat, he’s part of a generation of clinicians ushering in digital health and the interesting and evolving role of Google Glass.

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First aid training will be compulsory for all nursery staff | Nursery World

First aid training will be compulsory for all nursery staff | Nursery World | First Aid Training | Scoop.it
The plans are in response to a campaign by Joanne and Dan Thompson, whose daughter Millie died after choking at a nursery in 2012.

More than 100,000 people signed the couple’s online petition calling for compulsory first aid training.

All Level 2 and Level 3 staff will be required to have an emergency paediatric first aid or a full paediatric first aid certificate if they are to count towards the staff-qualification ratios in the EYFS. Currently early years providers must have one first-aider on the premises at all times.

The emergency first aid training course would be equivalent to one day's training and will need to be refreshed by staff every three years to count towards the ratios.

The Thompsons have also given their backing to a new first aid certificate in memory of their daughter.

Early years settings will be able to display ‘Millie’s Mark’ as a sign of gold-standard provision.

The DfE will look into how this would be awarded and its scope, and the scheme is expected to run from early next year.

A consultation on the training proposals will take place during the next Parliament and they are expected to come into effect by September 2016.

The National Day Nurseries Association has also developed guidance and case studies with funding from the DfE.

The Government has also extended a special deal, previously only available to schools, to enable private and voluntary providers and out-of-school and holiday clubs, to buy defibrillators at a reduced cost.

Childcare and education minister Sam Gyimah said, ‘Today’s proposals will mean that thousands more staff will be able to respond to emergencies more quickly, making sure parents really can access the very best possible childcare choices for their families.

‘Not only will this help ensure children are safe while they learn, grow and develop, but it will also raise the quality and skills of the early years workforce to help them deal with day to day first aid issues such allergies and knowing when to call parents.’
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Faulty heart defibrillators costing lives, monitoring agency warns

Faulty heart defibrillators costing lives, monitoring agency warns | First Aid Training | Scoop.it
Up to a quarter of defibrillators installed in public places don't work, according to the agency in charge of registering the equipment.

The Automated External Defibrillator Deployment Agency has launched a new set of guidelines in an effort to stop flat batteries and software malfunctions in the units.

The agency's Graeme Pell said electronic defibrillators in workplaces, sporting clubs and other public places did not always work.

"There's nothing more frustrating than coming across somebody who's got a sudden cardiac arrest who clearly needs urgent defibrillation to save their lives and find that the defibrillator that you have in your hand, or in fact can't locate, simply won't do the job," he said.

In the United States, research has found that up to a quarter of equipment installed in public areas at any time did not work because of flat batteries, damage or software malfunctions.

Mr Peel estimated the figures were similar in Australia.

"Probably 20 to 25 per cent of defibrillators aren't working," he said.

"We also know that unless you get fibrillation on a sudden cardiac arrest patient within the first couple of minutes, then their chance of survival is very remote.

"Anecdotally, we believe that there probably are people dying unnecessarily."

Up to 33,000 Australians die from sudden cardiac arrest every year.

The agency today released a set of guidelines that helps businesses and organisations make sure equipment was ready for use in an emergency.

It is also setting a up voluntary register to keep track of all defibrillators around the country.

Mr Peel said there was one positive change already underway - defibrillators were becoming easier to use.

"You open it up and it talks to you. It'll tell you pull out the pads, where the pads have to be located and connections then basically you stand back and wait," he said.

"The battery's got to be working, the pads have got to stick, software has got to be functioning.

"There's been a huge amount of enthusiasm but not as much standardisation."

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Why do Marathon Runners Wear Foil Blankets After the Finish Line?

Why do Marathon Runners Wear Foil Blankets After the Finish Line? | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

If you have ever seen a marathon or watched one on TV you may have wondered why, when the runners have all finished the race, they get given those thin foil-like blankets. The blankets they are given help the athlete to regulate their body temperature, after a race a runner’s temperature will drop quite rapidly because they have ceased working their muscles.

As you can imagine, the blanket is not made from your run of the mill aluminium foil, they are actually a material that was in it’s earliest form used at NASA, which is where they get their colloquial name ‘space blankets’.

Astronauts use them, but they are also used in many areas of the public services too, especially in search and rescue, and emergency services.

The widely available space blanket, which you can now buy from Oh-PublicServices.com, was created as part of the American space program. In 1973 the heat shield had broken on the orbiting Skylab Space Station and was causing it to overheat. The temperature inside the station was nearly 54 degrees Celsius.

The temperature inside the station was rising and NASA began to worry about the equipment and the food that was stored. To regulate the temperature of the station the NASA engineers got in touch with National Metallizing a company that coated toys with thin metal and created Christmas decorations. NASA realised that the thin metallic sheets deflected heat, so working with National Metallizing they created a reflective parasol which was attached to the Skylab Space Station giving the station the ability to keep a normal temperature.

Essentially, a giant blanket made from the same material used in Christmas Tinsel was used to help protect a whole Space Station!

Like the Thermos Flask before it, the space blanket works on the same principle not only will it keep heat out, it will also keep the heat in. This is why the material that was used on the Skylab Space Station is also perfect for marathon runners. The heat the athletes are giving out will then be held inside the blanket allowing them to regulate their temperature as their body heat drops.

The foil blanket is also best used in emergency situations, search and rescue and before patients go into surgery to help regulate patient temperature.

If you would like to see Openhouse’s foil blankets please visit oh-publicservices.com

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Victory for Millie's Trust as government promises review of first aid training at nurseries

Victory for Millie's Trust as government promises review of first aid training at nurseries | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Stockport charity set up following baby's death organised petition which received 102,000 signatures and led to a House of Commons debate

A government minister has promised a national review into the provision of paediatric first aid in nurseries after a campaign by Stockport charity Millie’s Trust.

Joanne and Dan Thompson set up the charity after their nine-month-old daughter Millie died in a choking incident at a Cheadle Hulme nursery.

A petition they started which called on the government to change the law to make it compulsory for all nursery workers to be trained in paediatric first aid received more than 102,000 signatures.

Yesterday, their cause was discussed by 20 MPs at Westminster in a debate led by Cheadle MP Mark Hunter.

Parliamentary under-secretary of state for childcare and education, Sam Gyimah MP, promised a review to include a wide consultation of pre-schools on their practices, and what checks there are on first-aid training providers.

Joanne, 29, from Bramhall, said: “We are pleased that this legislation has been debated, and as far as we are concerned this is a positive outcome.

“We have known from the beginning this was never going to be an easy road.

"This has just been another stepping stone and we were encouraged by the fact the government want Dan and I to take part in the national review, and we will keep fighting on behalf of parents.”

Mr Hunter added: “It is great news that the government will have an official review on current policy and this will give us a real opportunity to change the law.

“I know that Millie’s Trust and all their loyal supporters will join me in taking the opportunity to input into the review and ensuring that the case for change is unanswerable.

“I look forward to hearing from the minister about the finer details of the review.”

Millie’s Trust aims to raise awareness of paediatric first aid training and to fund training for the parents and carers of children who might not be able to afford it.

It has trained 7,000 nursery staff and parents, and saved more than 100 lives.

Millie died at Ramillies Hall School nursery in October 2012 and an inquest heard the nursery supervisor looking after her did not have a current first aid certificate.

Last week, it was announced that ambulances around the country will need to carry a paediatric kit following a recommendation from the coroner at Millie’s inquest.

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Man saved by heroic passers-by

Man saved by heroic passers-by | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

THE heroic actions of a quick thinking woman from Alcester and her friend saved a cyclist's life when he collapsed on a country road.

The man was cycling along Fish Hill near the Cotswold village of Broadway last March when he collapsed.

Fortunately he was spotted on the side of the road by Gemma Guedes, 30, from Alcester, and her friend Katie Nightingale, who were only travelling down the road by chance after taking a wrong turn on their way to take Gemma's pet puppy for a walk.

 

The pair spotted the man receiving CPR from a fellow cyclist and immediately remembered that there were defibrillators kept at the nearby Farncombe Estate, where they both used to work.

"It was very worrying to see someone receiving CPR as it was the first time that I have ever been in that situation," said Mrs Guedes. "We were just very lucky that Farncombe Estate was so close and that they have trained people to use the defibrillator."

The friends called ahead and were met by security supervisor Tony Haines, of Pensham, near Pershore, who had grabbed a defibrillator.

They dashed back to the stricken man with Mr Haines - an experienced St John Ambulance volunteer - in tow and used the defibrillator to re-start his heart.

He was then rushed to Worcestershire Royal Hospital, where grateful medics confirmed the cyclist would not have survived without the defibrillator and their quick-thinking actions.

"When we arrived the man was starting to turn blue around the lips - Tony gave him a single shock and his heart re-started. After a few minutes the man started talking, which was a huge relief to everyone.

"We waited for the Air Ambulance to arrive and once the man was airlifted to the hospital you could feel that everyone felt a great sense of achievement," added Mrs Guedes.

Mr Haines said he was glad the estate had the vital life-saving equipment . Both he and St John Ambulance are now urging more places, especially in isolated rural locations, to get equipment of their own.

Mr Haines said: “We gave the man a single shock and his heart restarted. Within a few minutes he was talking, it was amazing.

“This incident just goes to show what a difference a defibrillator can make and I would urge as many organisations as possible to have one on hand in case of emergency.”

 

 

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Scottish Dentists to be given defibrillators

Scottish Dentists to be given defibrillators | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Defibrillators are to be installed in every Scottish NHS dental practice.

The £1m Scottish government scheme aims to boost the survival chances for people who have cardiac arrests.

The 970 defibrillators will also be mapped by ambulance staff so call handlers can direct people to the nearest one while patients wait for paramedics to arrive.

More than 1,500 Scots died in the community last year after suffering a cardiac arrest.

A defibrillator can be used by anyone to deliver an electric shock to the chest to restore a person's heart to a normal rhythm after a cardiac arrest.

'Every second counts'

Ministers said that currently, only 5% of people who have a cardiac arrest in the community survive and every minute of delay cuts their chances.

Public Health Minister Michael Matheson said: "Every second counts when someone's heart goes into cardiac arrest and having access to a defibrillator can mean the difference between life and death.

"As these machines are becoming easier to use it is only right that the public have more access to its life-saving potential in any public place.

"There are almost 1,000 NHS dental practices in the centre of Scottish communities. By giving them this equipment we are providing 1,000 more chances to save a life.

"I believe that this investment will save many more lives."

The machines are expected to be in place by the end of August.

Any dental practice which has already bought a defibrillator will be compensated.

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The FINANCIAL - Poll Reveals Nearly 80 Percent of Employed Adults Can’t Locate Their Workplace’s Defibrillator

The FINANCIAL - Poll Reveals Nearly 80 Percent of Employed Adults Can’t Locate Their Workplace’s Defibrillator | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

The FINANCIAL -- Each year, approximately 300,000 people suffer out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrests (SCA) that require revival from an automated external defibrillator (AED). Although many workplaces have AEDs on site, it’s likely that a majority of workers would not be prepared to locate and use the units, according to the results of a survey commissioned by Cintas Corporation, one of the leaders in first-aid and safety programs.

 

The survey, conducted online by Harris Interactive among 2,019 adults ages 18 and older (of whom 916 are employed), found that 79 percent of employed adults do not know where their workplace’s AED is located.


“The American Red Cross says that bystanders could save at least 20,000 additional SCA victims each year with more widespread use of AEDs,” said Jamie Samide, Senior Director of Marketing, Cintas. “Our survey suggests that this may be a challenge unless more organizations partner with a first aid provider like Cintas to ensure AEDs are properly installed and maintained. Organizations must also train their employees to know how to recognize the symptoms of SCA and find and use the units,” Samide added.

The September 2013 survey indicates that many workplaces need to make AEDs more available. Thirty percent of employed U.S. adults note that their workplace does not have an AED on site. Merely having an AED on-site, however, is only the first step. Organizations also need to train their employees on the use of AEDs to improve employee confidence and skills in situations involving them. Of employed U.S. adults:

Less than 1 in 5 (17 percent) feel confident that they could reach the nearest AED in their workplace and return to the victim quicklyEighty-six percent would not feel comfortable using the AED during an emergency such as cardiac arrestEighty-eight percent have not received training on the proper use of the workplace AED


“Too often, we find that workplaces believe having an AED on site is an adequate precaution in regards to SCA,” added Samide. “To increase confidence and effectiveness during an emergency, organizations should work with a safety provider that offers AEDs, tests and inspections, and training, to save time and ensure ongoing safety and compliance.”

Mike Taylor's insight:

An article from the US, but I can't see the UK being much different.

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New coroners' advice could save hundreds of lives, UK

New coroners' advice could save hundreds of lives, UK | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Coroners could save lives by telling family members of a loved one lost to a heart condition to get screened themselves.

Guidance (1) led by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) has been developed with the Chief Coroner of England and Wales to ensure that if someone dies from an inherited heart condition, the coroner recommends directly to relatives that they are screened as well.

Around 600 people aged just 35 or under die suddenly each year with apparently no explanation or cause of death, leaving families shocked and distraught (2). Often the cause is due to an inherited heart condition. Signposting family members to their GP for a referral to a cardiac genetic clinic could save the lives of siblings and children of those affected by detecting the same potentially fatal condition and prompting immediate treatment and monitoring.

Suzanne Morton, who lost her 20-year-old son, Luke, last year to an undiagnosed heart condition, said: "It's a mother's instinct to want to protect her children. I couldn't protect Luke from a heart condition I didn't know he had. But, by telling Luke's story, I hope I can prevent other parents from going through the pain of losing a child so suddenly.

"That's why I'm getting behind these new guidelines for coroners, which will make sure that families are screened to see if they are carrying an undetected heart condition. Even if it even saves the life of one young person, it'll be worth it."

Professor Peter Weissberg, Medical Director at the BHF, said: "The death of a loved one can sadly be the first time people find out about an inherited heart condition in their family. Yet, even after a 'suspicious' death, family members are not always screened themselves. Their life could be in danger and their family could be devastated all over again - something a simple blood test could set right.

"We are delighted the Chief Coroner is supporting this important guidance. It will save lives and prevent families suffering a second, devastating loss."

HHJ Peter Thornton QC, Chief Coroner of England and Wales, said: "This guidance, which will be issued to all coroners, will help to avoid a second death in a family from an inherited heart condition. It is a vital part of coroner work to prevent future deaths wherever possible."

Professor Huon Gray, National Clinical Director for Cardiac Care, NHS England, said: "Identifying and offering treatment to families with a genetic risk of sudden cardiac death is a priority for the NHS and forms part of the Government's Cardiovascular Disease Outcome Strategy.

"It is fantastic that the Chief Coroner and the BHF are supporting this important work. With such collaboration I believe we can make great progress, and help reduce the loss of young lives and the great stress that this causes their families and friends."

 

 

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Grandfather saved by CPR training

Grandfather saved by CPR training | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

A GRANDFATHER has told how he would be "eternally grateful" to the woman who saved his life after he collapsed in a Falmouth restaurant.

John Ollernshaw, from Flushing, would have died if a member of staff from Princess Pavilion had not resuscitated him during a cardiac arrest in November.

John Ollernshaw and wife Sylvia, with Ceinwen Morgans, who performed CPR on him after he collapsed.

 

Catering team leader Ceinwen Morgans started CPR on the 82-year-old within minutes of the arrest, having been trained in first aid just a few weeks earlier.

Mr Ollernshaw said: "I guess I was in the right place at the right time.

 

"If it had happened somewhere else, who knows what the chances of finding someone who knew what to do would have been.

"I will be eternally grateful to that young lady and the fact she had completed the first aid course."

Mr Ollernshaw's wife, Sylvia, credited Ms Morgans with saving his life.

"He went straight down and the girl just started resuscitating him immediately until the paramedics came," she said. "She cracked two of his ribs in the process and she had to keep going for a considerable amount of time. It was that which saved his life.

"We have been told that if the waitress hadn't been trained he would have died before the paramedic arrived.

"It was just amazing really, it seemed like it was just instinctive for her which was marvellous."

It was the first time Ms Morgans, from Falmouth, had put her training into practical use since completing the course. She said: "It all just happened so quickly and luckily I knew what to do. Nothing can prepare you for the real thing. I think my adrenalin carried me through and I was able to just get on with it but afterwards it was a little bit traumatising.

"If there hadn't been someone like me there that day then John would have died and his family would have faced Christmas and the new year without him."

Mr Ollernshaw, a dad of two and grandfather of three, had to be defibrillated on the way to the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro. In the ambulance, his wife was warned he was unlikely to survive the night.

"Our local vicar came with me to the hospital and by the time we got there the staff had managed to get him going on the machines because he wasn't able to do it himself," said Mrs Ollernshaw.

He remained on life support for four days before he was able to breathe on his own, then spent almost a month in hospital, during which he underwent heart-bypass surgery.

Alison Brown, cardiac rehab nurse at the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust, said: "It is fantastic that he was in a public place where there was someone who had been recently trained in CPR."

 

 

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Rules change for reporting accidents at work - People Management Magazine Online

The price for failing to report accidents or provide first-aid is potentially high

Under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR), employers must report any work-related deaths, and certain work-related injuries, cases of disease, and near misses involving employees

Employers must also ensure that they provide suitably trained personnel and have adequate equipment and facilities for giving first-aid to employees who are injured or become ill at work. This is a requirement under the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (as amended) (FAR).

Changes to the law

Changes to both RIDDOR and FAR introduced on 1 October 2013 aim to simplify reporting requirements by removing some of the ambiguity that existed previously.

The mechanism for reporting under RIDDOR remains unchanged. Employers are still required to report relevant accidents to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) within a reasonable time frame.

The main changes include:

a shorter list of ‘specified injuries’, instead of the ‘classification of major injuries’eight categories of ‘work related illnesses’, rather than 47 reportable industrial diseases.fewer ‘dangerous occurrences’ that require reporting

There is still a requirement under FAR to provide adequate first-aid cover, facilities and equipment. However the HSE will no longer approve first-aid providers. This means that employers themselves will need to make sure that training providers can prove their competence in relation to FAR.

Which trainer?

An advantage of the change in the regulations is that rather than running HSE approved courses, some training providers can now provide bespoke, industry specific first aid training. This makes it vitally important that they are appropriately qualified but it is also advisable to retain trainers with experience in your industry so that the training can be tailored to specific risks.

Training providers should be able to produce the following documentation to aid in establishing their competence and relevant experience:

a current First Aid at Work certificate (or exemption if applicable)a documented quality assurance plana brief of what the syllabus covers.

Training providers previously approved by the HSE are always a good option, as are trainers approved by organisations such as Ofqual.

Checklist

In relation to RIDDOR not much has changed. However, employers need to:

obtain a copy of the new legislation related to RIDDOR, which can be found at www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2013/1471/contents/made, and gives a list of the new categories for reporting – an invaluable tool for ensuring the right type of incident is reported;ensure that all H&S representatives and any H&S committees are aware of and trained in these new categories.

In relation to FAR, employers should ensure that:

trainers are competent in first aid and hold appropriate qualifications;training organisations have quality assurance plans for auditing their training;training providers demonstrate that they work to accepted training standards;first-aid courses are taught in accordance with recognised and accepted first aid practice;first-aid training courses are relevant to the organisation’s industry;appropriate certificates are issued to assessed students;

Employers would also be well advised to ask for recommendations or feedback from previous training sessions.

Comment

Companies have been successfully prosecuted for failing to report accidents in accordance with RIDDOR or for not reporting them in a timely manner. Getting it wrong can be costly. In R v Nicholls & Clarke Glass Ltd, the company was fined £11,200.

Prosecutions under FAR are rare. The case of R v TS (UK) Ltd resulted from a fatal accident where there were no first-aiders to give initial treatment prior to the arrival of paramedics. As well as receiving a £130,000 fine under the Health and Safety at Work Act. 1974, the company was also fined £10,000 for the first aid offence. 

Making sure that there are appropriately trained first-aiders on hand will not only help you avoid such penalties but could also have a considerable impact on employees’ injuries or suffering.

Semra Zack-Williams is a Health & Safety Specialist and Stuart Jones is Head of Employment at Weightmans

Further information can be found at www.hse.gov.uk

 

 

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Injury Reporting Changes Take Effect in UK -- Occupational Health & Safety

Injury Reporting Changes Take Effect in UK -- Occupational Health & Safety | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Business owners in the United Kingdom can breathe easier—two regulations took effect on Oct. 1 that will help them comply with health and safety regulations, according to a news release from HSE.

The first change is an amendment to the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981. The change removes the requirement for HSE to approve first aid training and qualifications, giving business owners much more flexibility. The change is part of HSE's attempt to "reduce the burden on businesses and put common sense back into health and safety," according to the agency.

The second legislative change is to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995. The new change clarifies and simplifies the reporting requirements while also ensuring that the data gives an accurate and useful picture of workplace incidents. Specifically, the changes include different classification of major injuries (a shorter list of specified injuries is used), eight categories for industrial disease instead of 47 types, and fewer types of occurrences that need to be reported.

For more information, visit http://www.hse.gov.uk/press/2013/hse-legislation-changes.htm.

 

 

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Denmark setting the bar for CPR! | CPR Professionals Blog

People who suffer a cardiac arrest in Denmark today are three times more likely to survive than a decade ago, thanks largely to a national effort to teach people CPR, a new study says.

Denmark launched a national effort in 2005 to teach its residents to perform CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, in order to save people who suffer a cardiac arrest outside a hospital. The country gave out 150,000 instructional kits; kids began learning CPR as early as elementary school. Teens were required to learn CPR in order to get a driver’s license.

The results have been dramatic, say authors of a study in today’s Journal of the American Medical Association, or JAMA. About 300,000 people in North America each year suffer a cardiac arrest, when the heart stops beating, outside of a hospital.

In Denmark, the number of cardiac arrest victims who received “bystander” CPR — from someone other than a health professional — more than doubled, from 22% in 2001 to 45% in 2010.

In the same time period, the percentage of cardiac arrest victims who arrived at a hospital alive increased from 8% to 22%.

The percentage of patients alive after 30 days tripled, growing from 3.5% to 11%. The percentage of patients alive after one year also more than tripled, from 3% in 2001 to 10% in 2010.

Those findings are impressive, says Michael Sayre, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Washington and a spokesman for the American Heart Association.

Although other studies have looked at smaller, community efforts to promote CPR, Sayre says the new study is striking because it involved an entire country.

Thanks to efforts by the heart association, Washington and a handful of other states now require students to take a CPR class before graduating from high school, Sayre says.

Still, study authors say that Denmark’s CPR initiative can’t take all of the credit for improving survival.

That’s because Denmark also made other important changes aimed at increasing survival after a heart attack, such as improving the care provided both by hospitals and emergency medical services.

“Teaching bystanders the importance of CPR can make a difference,” says Suzanne Steinbaum, director of the program on women and heart disease Lenox Hill Hospital’s Heart and Vascular Institute, in New York.

Performing CPR is actually easier than ever, Steinbaum says. That’s because the heart association now recommends a “hands-only” CPR procedure, in which bystanders concentrate on performing chest compressions, instead of alternating compressions with mouth-to-mouth breathing.

“Those who witness a cardiac arrest and start CPR can actually change the outcome of what happens to the victim,” she says.

 

 

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What to do, and what not to do, if bitten by a snake

What to do, and what not to do, if bitten by a snake | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

AUSTRALIA is home to 20 of the world's most deadly 25 species of snakes.

This staggering statistic means that you, your family, a neighbour or pet could come into contact with one of the world's deadliest snakes when you go on a bushwalk or even in your own backyard.

Snake bite incidents are already occurring this season and St John Ambulance (Qld) is recommending all Queenslanders familiarise themselves with the correct first aid treatment for treating snake bites.

St John Training Manager Darryl Clare said there were many myths involving first aid treatment for snake bites, and it was important for Queenslanders to know fact from fiction.

"A common myth is sucking the venom out of a snake bite - this will simply spread the poison to another person and you will be left with two victims instead of one," he said.

"Do not wash the bitten area or try to catch the snake - your first step in any situation is to follow the DRSABCD action plan (Danger, Response, Send for help, Airway, Breathing, CPR, and Defibrillation)."

"Ensure the casualty is relaxed as much as possible; reassure them that everything will be ok - this will slow down the time it takes for the venom to go through the body."

"Apply a pressure bandage with immobilisation, then splint the bandaged limb."

"Mark the site of the bite on the bandage and write down as much information as you can, such as the time of the bite, a description of the snake and when the bandage was applied."

Darryl said common symptoms of a snake bite victim included a headache, nausea, drooping eyelids, drowsiness and problems speaking.

"If you are unsure what type of snake bit your casualty, always call triple zero '000' for an ambulance."

Snake bites - the Australian statistics

1500 - 3000 cases of snake bite each yearApproximately 300 require treatment with anti-venom2-3 deaths per yearOver the last 25 years the death rate has dramatically decreased due to improved first aid treatment, improved identification and treatment with anti venom.

Source:  www.csl.com.au

Signs and symptoms of snakebite

Signs of snakebite are not always visible and symptoms may only start to appear an hour or more after the person has been bitten.

Symptoms that can develop in the first hour or more:

Nausea, vomiting and diarrhoeaHeadacheDouble or blurred visionDrooping eyelidsBleeding from the bite siteBreathing difficultiesDrowsiness, giddiness or faintingProblems speaking or swallowing, voice changePain or tightness in the chest throat or abdomenRespiratory weakness or arrestDark urine

Symptoms that can develop up to three hours after the bite:

Limb paralysisHypoxiaCyanosisDecrease in the level of conscious

Snake bite management:

DRSABCD (Danger, Response, Send for help, Airway, Breathing, CPR and Defibrillation)Rest and reassure the casualtyPressure immobilisation bandageSeek medical aid urgently

DO NOT:

Wash venom off skinCut bitten areaTry and suck venom outUse tourniquetAttempt to catch snakeAllow casualty to walk

These first aid tips are not a substitute for first aid training.

St John Ambulance offers a range of first aid courses including Apply  First Aid, Resuscitation and Workplace First Aid.

For more information visit www.stjohnqld.com.au or call 1300 360 455.

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Every school in Edinburgh to get defibrillators

Every school in Edinburgh to get defibrillators | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

EVERY high school in the Capital will be equipped with a life-saving defibrillator to ensure that thousands of teenagers never suffer the terrible fate of teenage footballer Jamie Skinner. 

City chiefs have teamed up with the Scottish Ambulance Service to spend more than £34,000 on the vital devices for all 23 secondary schools in Edinburgh, following months of campaigning by the Skinner family and the Evening News.

The move has been hailed as a “great legacy” for super-fit Jamie, who suffered a fatal cardiac arrest while making his debut for Tynecastle FC at Saughton in December 2013.

His heartbroken family has fought tirelessly for better defibrillator provision, teaming up with the News to launch the Shockingly Easy campaign in July to ensure the heart-start machines are installed in every sports club in the Lothians.

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Public Access Defibrillation Underutilized in Cardiac Arrest

Public Access Defibrillation Underutilized in Cardiac Arrest | First Aid Training | Scoop.it
(HealthDay News) — In out-of-hospital (OOH) cardiac arrest, public access defibrillation (PAD) prior to ambulance arrival may be only rarely used, according to a study published online February 19 in Heart.

Charles D. Deakin, MD, from South Central Ambulance Service in Otterbourne, U.K., and colleagues ascertained the availability and effective use of PAD in all OOH cardiac arrests in Hampshire over a 12-month period. To establish the known presence of PAD, emergency calls were reviewed; in addition, a review of all known PAD locations in Hampshire was undertaken.

The researchers found that 673 known PADs were located in 278 Hampshire locations during the study period. Of the 1,035 calls confirmed as cardiac arrest, access to an automated external defibrillator was reported in 4.25% of calls (44 occasions). The automated external defibrillator was successfully retrieved and used before ambulance arrival in 1.74% of cases (18 occasions).

"This study highlights the need for both improved PAD availability and the need to improve bystander confidence in the use of these devices," the authors write. "With survival from OOH cardiac arrest doubling in cases where PAD is used, there is a need to improve PAD availability, publicize locations and support bystanders in deploying the device."

One author disclosed financial ties to South Central Ambulance Service and Prometheus Medical.
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Minister backs campaign for vital CPR lessons in schools

Minister backs campaign for vital CPR lessons in schools | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Schools Minister David Laws backs Mail on Sunday campaign to introduce vital CPR lessons in schools

Every child could leave school with essential lifesaving skills after Ministers backed campaign to add first aid to curriculum
Mr Laws became the first high-profile member of Coalition to support move
He said: ‘All children should leave school with the essential skills and knowledge that prepares them for life'

Schools Minister David Laws became the first high-profile member of the Coalition to support the move

Every child could leave school with essential lifesaving skills after Ministers backed a Mail on Sunday campaign to add first aid to the curriculum.

Schools Minister David Laws became the first high-profile member of the Coalition to support the move, piling pressure on Education Secretary Nicky Morgan to introduce mandatory training for first aid in schools.

Mr Laws said the crucial skills should be taught as a compulsory part of Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) lessons, which also cover sex education, anti-bullying and careers advice.

The newspaper is campaigning to make sure all schools teach basic first aid techniques – simple acts that could save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. The skills can also be taught by older children to their younger peers.

Our campaign now has cross-party support and is also backed by teachers and a number of leading charities.

Mr Laws said: ‘Parents expect to see some basic standards laid out on what their children will learn in school. All children should leave school with the essential skills and knowledge that prepares them for life.

‘Liberal Democrats are clear that all schools should teach Personal, Social and Health Education, and that we would expect that to include first aid.’

Mr Laws’s statement comes after Lib Dems voted in October to include mandatory first aid training in schools in their latest manifesto.

Tory Health Minister Earl Howe has also voiced his support, saying: ‘First aid is a highly valuable, potentially lifesaving skill and I encourage schools to teach pupils first aid through their PSHE lessons.’

 

Lib Dem MP Sir Bob Russell, chairman of the all-party parliamentary group on first aid, said he hoped the other two main parties would also add the proposals to their pre-Election manifestos.

‘Mr Laws is considering these proposals,’ he said. ‘Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said he sees this as part of the preventative agenda.’

Other politicians backing the plans include Labour’s Julie Hilling and Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris.

Ms Hilling said: ‘This is as essential as learning to read or write. Learning to save a life is precious.’

Charities including St John Ambulance and the British Heart Foundation are also behind the scheme.

BHF chief executive Simon Gillespie said: ‘A future government will need to play its part by making CPR part of the curriculum – a move that already has the support of the public, teachers and doctors.’

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Fulford & District Community First Responders support local life saving initiatives. | The Stone and Eccleshall Gazette

Residents from the Fulford and district area attended free, two hour Heart Start & Defibrillator awareness courses on Sunday 29th June 2014.

They learnt vital lifesaving skills, which could help keep a person alive until medical help arrives.

The course was provided by Mike Taylor (of Abacus Training), David Thomas and Mel Avis, who are all volunteer responders with the Fulford & District Community First Responder charity. ‘Heart Start’ is a national scheme that is being supported by the West Midlands Ambulance Service across Staffordshire, in association with the British Heart Foundation.

Mel Avis explained,

“24 local people were trained in basic life saving skills today. Our aim was two-fold: to raise awareness of the Community Public Access Defibrillator that has recently been installed at Fulford Village Hall and to teach skills that could make an enormous difference to saving someone’s life. It was a great success!”

Participants attending Fulford & District Heart Start and Defibrillator Awareness workshop on Sunday 29th June 2014, outside the village hall, with Heart Start trainer, Mike Taylor.

Acting quickly when someone is in cardiac arrest is crucially important. Early CPR and Early Defibrillation significantly increase a person’s chance of survival. People should not be afraid to learn how to use a cPAD. They are designed specifically for use in community settings and provide a series of voice prompts and illuminated illustrations to guide the rescuer.

“Any initiatives, whether it’s community life saving training or new devices such as the cPAD, are welcome additions to our local communities, saving vital minutes whilst the ambulance service arrives, especially in rural villages.”

says Mike Taylor (of Abacus Training).

“The course was excellent and I now feel confident that I could deal with an emergency while waiting for the professionals to arrive…. If you get the opportunity then get trained up!”

says participant, Sarah Cox

“Training was excellent, easy to understand and remember. Do it and be useful to someone who may need your help.”

says participant, Jacqui Leach

For more information about First Aid courses or the Heart Start scheme, please contact: Mike@fulfordanddistrictcfr.co.uk or visit www.abacustraining.co.uk

Special thanks to:
The Fulford Village Hall cPAD has been part funded through a scheme with the British Heart Foundation. However, it would not have been at all possible without the support and fundraising efforts of a lot of local organisations, groups and local individuals. We would like to extend special thanks to: The Cheadle Round Table, Blythe Bridge Rotary Club, Fulford & District Community CFRs, the Fulford Village Hall Committee, Mr & Mrs Ostrouchow, Mr C Bloor, Ms J Lawton, Mrs W Godfrey and Mrs J Tarr, Headteacher at Fulford Primary School.

About Fulford & District Community First Responders:
Fulford and District Community First Responders are a busy and dedicated group of volunteers who have responded to over 2000 emergency calls with the West Midlands Ambulance Service, since the group formed in July 2008. We run weekly pub quizzes to raise money for our charity, please check our Facebook page for details and come along! If you are able to make a donation or host a fundraising event for us, please contact Chad Bloor (Group fundraiser) 07535313132 or David Steele (Group Coordinator) 07946185945.

Fulford & District CFRs can be followed on Facebook and Twitter @FulfordCFR

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Man campaigns to purchase defibrillators - then has life saved by one

Man campaigns to purchase defibrillators - then has life saved by one | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

A MAN who spearheaded a campaign to purchase defibrillators for use in and around East Grinstead has remarkably had his own life saved by one of the devices.

Jim Miller admits he would be "six feet under" had it not been for the shock he received from one of the machines following a recent heart attack.

The 82-year-old helped to raise enough money to fund three new defibrillators in his role as a volunteer for East Grinstead and District Lions Club back in 2010.

The club purchased the devices to be used by first responders – people living within communities who attend local medical emergencies while paramedics are still on their way.

And another defibrillator, at East Surrey Hospital, ended up saving Jim's own life on March 18.

He said: "I had some discomfort in my chest and I thought it was heartburn.

"I was taken by ambulance to East Surrey Hospital and they were about to send me home. I went to use the phone to tell my wife the good news and that's the last thing I remember. The next thing I knew, I was surrounded by all these people telling me to stay calm and not to move."

Coincidentally, another East Grinstead resident with close links to the lcoal Lions Club also had his life saved by a defibrillator after he suffered a cardiac arrest in February.

Gordon Gould, who runs the charity's website, collapsed at his doctors' surgery, but was resuscitated immediately and transferred to St George's Hospital, in Tooting, by ambulance.

He said: "Defibrillation needs to be applied very quickly, because for every minute that a person is in cardiac arrest before defibrillation, their chances of survival are reduced by about ten per cent. First responders are local volunteers, trained in lifesaving skills and in how to use a defibrillator, and can often get to a scene quicker than an ambulance.

"I am so grateful that a defibrillator was available to save my life, and the more first responders with defibrillators there are, the more lives will be saved."

The defibrillators funded by the Lions in 2010 have been made available for use by first responders in East Grinstead, Lingfield and Dormansland.

Jim, of Fulmar Drive, East Grinstead, said: "The idea is to have a first responder available within eight minutes of an incident. These are people who are trained to use defibrillators and without them, I would be six feet under.

"They saved my life and they saved Gordon's life."

Lifesaving training for first responders is provided by the South East Coast Ambulance Service (SECAmb), though the service admits it does not currently have the funding to support new volunteers. Instead, SECAmb is keen to raise awareness and money for the service.

First responder Richard Herbert, from Dormansland, said: "As first responders, we're not just there for heart attacks. We help with anything an ambulance can help with, such as first aid, cuts and breakages."


Read more: http://www.eastgrinsteadcourier.co.uk/Volunteer-launches-campaign-purchase/story-20894032-detail/story.html#ixzz2yrpyRAVt

 

 

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Take heart - new schools will all get defibrillators, supported by Michael Gove

Take heart - new schools will all get defibrillators, supported by Michael Gove | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

ALL new schools are to be equipped with life-saving defibrillators to cut the number of child heart deaths.

The move, supported by Education Secretary Michael Gove, will be announced in Chancellor George Osborne’s Budget later this month.

More than 270 pupils die after suffering heart attacks at school every year but, according to charity SADS, only 80 of 30,000 schools have automated external defibrillators, which cost £1,500.

Sick youngsters given an electric shock to the heart with the life-saving devices are 50 per cent more likely to survive a coronary than those who have to wait for an ambulance. The odds in rural areas are 75 per cent.

The initiative is being spearheaded by Conservative MP Andrew Percy, a trained first responder who has helped raise funds to buy defibrillators for six schools in his Brigg and Goole constituency. It is backed by the British Heart Foundation, Red Cross, St John Ambulance and Oliver King Foundation.

Mr Percy told the Sunday Express: “It is a national scandal that children are dying unnecessarily in this country because there are not enough public access defibrillators. A relatively small one-off investment could have a lasting legacy, which is why for me it is a complete no-brainer.”

Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011.

A year after Oliver’s death his family set up the Oliver King Foundation, which wants to see defibrillators installed in all schools, sports centres and other public buildings.

Oliver’s father, Mark, said: “We are losing children who are fit and healthy every week to cardiac arrests.

“When my own son died we waited more than 20 minutes for the ambulance to arrive and it was a seven-minute journey to hospital. I know that had there been a defibrillator on site, he would be here today.

“My question to the Government is why is there a postcode lottery with ­children’s lives with there being defibrillators at some schools and not others?”

 

 

ALL new schools are to be equipped with life-saving defibrillators to cut the number of child heart deaths.By: Marco GiannangeliPublished: Sun, March 9, 2014   

Defibrillators will be supplied to schools to cut down child heart attack deaths [GETTY]

The move, supported by Education Secretary Michael Gove, will be announced in Chancellor George Osborne’s Budget later this month.

More than 270 pupils die after suffering heart attacks at school every year but, according to charity Sads, only 80 of 30,000 schools have automated external defibrillators, which cost £1,500.

Sick youngsters given an electric shock to the heart with the life-saving devices are 50 per cent more likely to survive a coronary than those who have to wait for an ambulance. The odds in rural areas are 75 per cent.

The initiative is being spearheaded by Conservative MP Andrew Percy, a trained first responder who has helped raise funds to buy defibrillators for six schools in his Brigg and Goole constituency. It is backed by the British Heart Foundation, Red Cross, St John Ambulance and Oliver King Foundation.

Mr Percy told the Sunday Express: “It is a national scandal that children are dying unnecessarily in this country because there are not enough public access defibrillators. A relatively small one-off investment could have a lasting legacy, which is why for me it is a complete no-brainer.”

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Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011

Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011.

A year after Oliver’s death his family set up the Oliver King Foundation, which wants to see defibrillators installed in all schools, sports centres and other public buildings.

Oliver’s father, Mark, said: “We are losing children who are fit and healthy every week to cardiac arrests.

“When my own son died we waited more than 20 minutes for the ambulance to arrive and it was a seven-minute journey to hospital. I know that had there been a defibrillator on site, he would be here today.

“My question to the Government is why is there a postcode lottery with ­children’s lives with there being defibrillators at some schools and not others?”

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Making defibrillators as common as fire extinguishers could save lives

Making defibrillators as common as fire extinguishers could save lives | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Despite several campaigns to increase numbers of defibrillators in public places - and the English government's acknowledgement of their life-saving role - public access to them is low, as is understanding of their use, says a new UK study. The findings imply it would be a different story if defibrillators were as accessible and as well understood as fire extinguishers.

Estimates from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) suggest around 60,000 out of hospital cardiac arrests occur in the UK every year.

A defibrillator - also called an automated external defibrillator or AED - is a device that delivers an electric shock to the heart of someone who is having a cardiac arrest. Prompt use of an AED can shock the heart back into rhythm.

Acting quickly when someone is in cardiac arrest before the ambulance arrives can save their life. Every minute without CPR and defibrillation reduces their chance of survival by 10%.

The aim of the new UK study was to find out how available AEDs were, given the effort that has been put in over the last 10 years to promote and deploy them in public places, such as shopping centers and train stations.

The study was conducted by researchers from the University of Southamptom, working with the South Central Ambulance Service, and it is published in the journal Heart.

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Cooling treatment credited with saving a cardiac arrest patient - Ocala

Cooling treatment credited with saving a cardiac arrest patient - Ocala | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Cooling treatment credited with saving a cardiac arrest patientOcalaShe suffered cardiac arrest, her body temperature was cooled by emergency health care workers to slow damage to her brain, and she was put into a coma.


Via Carl Robinson
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You are not dead until you are warm and dead...
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Performing 38 minutes of CPR can save patient's life, study finds

Performing CPR for 38 minutes or longer can improve a patient’s chance of surviving cardiac arrest, a new study has found.

The findings, presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013, revealed that sustaining CPR that long also improves the chances that survivors will have normal brain function.

Cardiac arrest occurs when electrical impulses in the heart become rapid or chaotic, causing it to suddenly stop beating.

In the US, about 80 percent of cardiac arrests, nearly 288,000 people, occur outside of a hospital each year, and fewer than 10 percent survive.

Research has found that the early return of spontaneous circulation — the body pumping blood on its own — is important for people to survive cardiac arrest with normal brain function.

However, little research has focused on the period between cardiac arrest and any return of spontaneous circulation.

The Japanese Circulation Society Resuscitation Science Study group tracked all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Japan between 2005 and 2011.

The researchers studied how much time passed between survivors’ collapse and the return of spontaneous circulation, and how well brain function was preserved a month later.

Survivors were considered to have fared well neurologically if they were alert and able to return to normal activities, or if they had moderate disability but were well enough to work part-time in a sheltered environment or take part in daily activities independently.

“The time between collapse and return of spontaneous circulation for those who fared well was 13 minutes compared to about 21 minutes for those who suffered severe brain disability”, said Ken Nagao, M.D., Ph.D., professor and director-in-chief of the Department of Cardiology, CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care at Surugadai Nihon University Hospital in Tokyo.

After adjusting for other factors that can affect neurological outcomes, the researchers found that the odds of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without severe brain damage dropped 5 percent for every 60 seconds that passed before spontaneous circulation was restored.

Based on the relationship between favourable brain outcomes and the time from collapse to a return of spontaneous circulation, the researchers calculated that CPR lasting 38 minutes or more was advisable.

“It may be appropriate to continue CPR if the return of spontaneous circulation occurs for any period of time”, concluded Nagao.

 

 

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Mystery of the world's most-kissed woman

Mystery of the world's most-kissed woman | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Millions of people around the world have learned CPR on a mannequin known as Resusci Anne. The story of the 19th Century beauty behind the model - or at least, one version of it - will be told at a symposium in London to mark European Restart a Heart Day. But does anyone really know anything about her?

The Lorenzi workshop is a small haven of peace and antiquity in the busy Parisian suburb of Arcueil. And it's the last of its kind. Downstairs the mouleurs, or cast-makers, create figurines, busts and statues, pouring plaster into moulds in much the same way they have since the family business started in the 1870s.

But if you want to be face-to-face with history, pick your way up the dusty wooden stairs to a room above the workshop. It's an unsettling experience. Hanging all around you in the narrow attic are life and death masks of poets and artists, politicians and revolutionaries: Napoleon, Robespierre, Verlaine, Victor Hugo, the robust, impatient face of the living Beethoven and the sallow, diminished features of the composer's death mask.

Yet, surprisingly, of all the visages of the great and the good on display at Lorenzi's, the best-seller is the mask of a young woman. She has a pleasant, attractive face, with the hint of a smile playing on her lips. Her eyes are closed but they look as if they might spring open at any moment. Hers is the one mask that has no name. She's known simply as the Inconnue, the unknown woman of the Seine.

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My HeartMap Seattle Challenge enlists the public to locate city’s life-saving devices | UW Today

My HeartMap Seattle Challenge enlists the public to locate city’s life-saving devices | UW Today | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Seattleites can join in a life-saving scavenger hunt. Players will compete to identify and report the locations of Seattle’s automatic external defibrillators, or AEDs, for a cash reward. Prizes range from $50 to $10,000.

AEDs are electronic briefcase-size devices designed to allow bystanders on scene at a medical emergency to help someone who has collapsed with loss of mechanical activity of the heart, or cardiac arrest.

“Our list of AED locations may be incomplete. We are seeking the public’s help to learn where more of these devices are,” said Dr. Graham Nichol, University of Washington professor of medicine in the Center for Pre-Hospital Emergency Care at UW Medicine’s Harborview Medical Center.

AEDs are cost-effective lifesavers that are often placed where cardiac arrests are most likely, such as airports, sports clubs and shopping malls, according to Nichol, who explained why it is important for a bystander to be able to locate an AED immediately.

“Cardiac arrests are a leading cause of death in the United States but can be treated if recognized and responded to quickly with an AED.”

 

Often cardiac arrest is due to ventricular fibrillation, in which the lower chambers of the heart quiver instead of contracting in a steady beat. AEDs simplify analysis of the heart rhythm. This enables lay people to recognize and treat ventricular fibrillation before emergency medical services providers arrive. Each device has voice and visual prompts that guide bystanders through the necessary steps.

More than 1.2 million AEDs are now in public places in the United States, and about 180,000 more are installed each year. Sometimes bystanders cannot find the nearest AED during a medical emergency. That’s where the My HeartMap Seattle challenge comes in. Game players will assist UW clinicians by reporting the location of AEDs in community settings throughout Seattle.

Here are the basic rules of the game.

  The contest starts Tuesday, Oct.15, and ends Friday, Nov. 15.  Complete your free registration to participate in the contest.  When you locate an AED in Seattle, report a brief description of it on the contest website, including the building address for the AED, its location within the building, and whether the device appears to be ready for use.  A $10,000 grand prize will be awarded to the individual or team that identifies the most unique AEDs. “Unique” means no other player or team has already found the AED. The grand prize will be “unlocked” when at least one individual or team identifies 500 AEDs or all contest participants collectively identify 750 AEDs.  Twenty $50 prizes are also available. Twenty AEDs in the city of Seattle have been pre-selected by the research team as “Golden AEDs.” These are unmarked, and those who are first to report a “Golden AED” will win $50.  You can follow MyHeartMap Seattle on twitter (@cprnation, #MyHeartMapSeattle) or at the CPR Nation website.

The AED scavenger hunt aims to build public awareness about AEDs, which are commonly contained in a clear glass wall box, sometimes near a fire extinguisher. The spot is generally marked with a symbol of an electrical charge passing through a heart shape.

The contest is modeled after a similar Philadelphia County project at the University of Pennsylvania, which in turn adapted an approach from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for its Red Balloon Challenge. Dr. Raina Merchant, University of Pennsylvania assistant professor of emergency medicine, directed the My HeartMap Philadelphia Challenge. She is the director of the Penn Medicine Social Media Lab and an expert in the use of digital strategies to educate the public on at-the-scene emergency aid. Merchant is collaborating with UW scientists on the My HeartMap Seattle Challenge.

“This is an exciting collaboration that could have a real impact on access to emergency care in Seattle and other regions throughout the country,” noted Merchant.

During the MyHeartMap Philadelphia challenge, participants submitted data about AED locations via a website and a phone app. Some 313 individuals and teams reported more than 1,400 AEDs. Prizes were given for reporting the most AEDs found or for being the first to report the location of specific previously selected devices.

“Most people realize that AEDs are simple enough to use,” Nichol said. “Just follow the voice and visual prompts. They are designed to provide a shock only when needed.”

An AED is usually activated by opening its lid. The commands then begin with visual, recorded and text instructions for baring the patient’s chest and sticking on the pads. Then the machine asks everyone to step back while it analyzes the heart rhythm. It repeats the request to stand clear if it decides to administer a shock. If the rhythm suddenly normalizes before a shock is delivered, the machine will report a rhythm change and announce that no shock will occur.

Most machines also instruct in CPR and coach the timing of compressions and breaths.

“My HeartMap Seattle will help us improve care for patient with out of hospital cardiac arrest,” Nichol said. “The methods and results of this AED scavenger hunt in Seattle will be applied to scavenger hunts in other large cities throughout the United States. In the future, we will have a comprehensive record of AED locations throughout the country.”

My HeartMap Seattle is funded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Zoll Medical Inc., Philips Healthcare Inc., Physio-Control Inc., HeartSine Technologies Inc. and Cardiac Science Inc.

The collaborating sponsors include the American Heart Association, Medic One Foundation, Nick of Time Foundation, University of Pennsylvania and University of Washington.

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Changes to first aid regulations come into effect

Businesses now have more flexibility in how they manage their provision of first aid in the workplace following a change in health and safety regulations.

As of today (1 October 2013), the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 have been amended, removing the requirement for HSE to approve first aid training and qualifications.

The change is part of HSE's work to reduce the burden on businesses and put common sense back into health and safety, whilst maintaining standards. The changes relating to first aid apply to businesses of all sizes and from all sectors.

Andy McGrory, HSE's policy lead for First Aid, said: "HSE no longer approves first-aid training and qualifications. Removing the HSE approval process will give businesses greater flexibility to choose their own training providers and first aid training that is right for their work place, based on their needs assessment and their individual business needs.

"Employers still have a legal duty to make arrangements to ensure their employees receive immediate attention if they are injured or taken ill at work."

Information, including the regulations document and a guidance document to help employers identify and select a competent training provider to deliver any first-aid training indicated by their first-aid needs assessment are available on the HSE website at http://www.hse.gov.uk/firstaid/.

HSE will continue to set the standards for training. While the changes give employers flexibility, the one day Emergency First Aid at Work (EFAW) and three day First Aid at Work (FAW) courses remain the building blocks for first aid training.

As part of the changes, the Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) text which was previously included in guidance document L74 (which consisted of only 12 sentences), has been incorporated into the new guidance. The advice in the guidance sets out clearly the recommended practical actions needed, and the standards to be achieved, to ensure compliance with duties under the 1981 Regulations. This is intended as a comprehensive guide on ensuring compliance with the law.

 

 

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