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Scottish Dentists to be given defibrillators

Scottish Dentists to be given defibrillators | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Defibrillators are to be installed in every Scottish NHS dental practice.

The £1m Scottish government scheme aims to boost the survival chances for people who have cardiac arrests.

The 970 defibrillators will also be mapped by ambulance staff so call handlers can direct people to the nearest one while patients wait for paramedics to arrive.

More than 1,500 Scots died in the community last year after suffering a cardiac arrest.

A defibrillator can be used by anyone to deliver an electric shock to the chest to restore a person's heart to a normal rhythm after a cardiac arrest.

'Every second counts'

Ministers said that currently, only 5% of people who have a cardiac arrest in the community survive and every minute of delay cuts their chances.

Public Health Minister Michael Matheson said: "Every second counts when someone's heart goes into cardiac arrest and having access to a defibrillator can mean the difference between life and death.

"As these machines are becoming easier to use it is only right that the public have more access to its life-saving potential in any public place.

"There are almost 1,000 NHS dental practices in the centre of Scottish communities. By giving them this equipment we are providing 1,000 more chances to save a life.

"I believe that this investment will save many more lives."

The machines are expected to be in place by the end of August.

Any dental practice which has already bought a defibrillator will be compensated.

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The FINANCIAL - Poll Reveals Nearly 80 Percent of Employed Adults Can’t Locate Their Workplace’s Defibrillator

The FINANCIAL - Poll Reveals Nearly 80 Percent of Employed Adults Can’t Locate Their Workplace’s Defibrillator | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

The FINANCIAL -- Each year, approximately 300,000 people suffer out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrests (SCA) that require revival from an automated external defibrillator (AED). Although many workplaces have AEDs on site, it’s likely that a majority of workers would not be prepared to locate and use the units, according to the results of a survey commissioned by Cintas Corporation, one of the leaders in first-aid and safety programs.

 

The survey, conducted online by Harris Interactive among 2,019 adults ages 18 and older (of whom 916 are employed), found that 79 percent of employed adults do not know where their workplace’s AED is located.


“The American Red Cross says that bystanders could save at least 20,000 additional SCA victims each year with more widespread use of AEDs,” said Jamie Samide, Senior Director of Marketing, Cintas. “Our survey suggests that this may be a challenge unless more organizations partner with a first aid provider like Cintas to ensure AEDs are properly installed and maintained. Organizations must also train their employees to know how to recognize the symptoms of SCA and find and use the units,” Samide added.

The September 2013 survey indicates that many workplaces need to make AEDs more available. Thirty percent of employed U.S. adults note that their workplace does not have an AED on site. Merely having an AED on-site, however, is only the first step. Organizations also need to train their employees on the use of AEDs to improve employee confidence and skills in situations involving them. Of employed U.S. adults:

Less than 1 in 5 (17 percent) feel confident that they could reach the nearest AED in their workplace and return to the victim quicklyEighty-six percent would not feel comfortable using the AED during an emergency such as cardiac arrestEighty-eight percent have not received training on the proper use of the workplace AED


“Too often, we find that workplaces believe having an AED on site is an adequate precaution in regards to SCA,” added Samide. “To increase confidence and effectiveness during an emergency, organizations should work with a safety provider that offers AEDs, tests and inspections, and training, to save time and ensure ongoing safety and compliance.”

Mike Taylor's insight:

An article from the US, but I can't see the UK being much different.

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Automated External Defibrillators and the Urban myths

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a life-threatening condition that must be treated within minutes if the victim is to survive. The only therapy which can treat the life-threatening arrhythmia that occur during SCA is defibrillation; the earlier the better. Various studies have determined that for every minute defibrillation is delayed survival falls rapidly. In one study it was determined that this fall in survival was around 7 to 10% while the British Heart Foundation (BHF) have concluded that the fall in survival percentage is 14%.

Defibrillation for the SCA victim needs to be part of the 'pattern of care'; a well-establish process - the Chain of Survival - assists the rescuer in giving the victim the best chance of survival; call for help, early CPR, early defibrillation and advanced life support.

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDS) are designed specifically to enable non-medical rescuers to treat SCA victims as they are safe, easy to use and effective.

There are, however,  a number of myths and mis-information around the whole issue of SCA and the use of an AED.

Lay persons are often confused between a heart attack and a sudden cardiac arrest. These are two separate medical conditions and although the first can lead to the second, an AED is designed to treat the unresponsive, not breathing victim the indications for SCA and the use of an AED.

Clinically, defibrillation does not 'jump' start the heart. Delivery of a biphasic electrical current depolarises the heart cells allowing the organ's natural 'pacemaker cells' to re-start and the heart to return to normal electrical activity or sinus rhythm. During SCA the heart is exhibiting ventricular fibrillation (VF) ; a chaotic discharge of electrical current that prevents oxygenated blood from circulating or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT) which while more regular is still too fast to again allow the effective circulation of blood thus denying the brain of oxygen.

People often ask about the 'danger' of rescuers or bystanders receiving a shock if they are touching the victim of SCA during defibrillation. While we have adopted the historical warning 'stand clear' from the use of manual defibrillators, studies show that current leakage from a defibrillation device using adhesive pads is actually minimal. The majority of current delivered being discharged into the chest and heart. The actual amount of current leakage recorded in one study measured this as well below 2,500 microamps, the international standard relating to this threshold. To put this into layman's terms this equates to the current from a standard nine volt battery. The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines (2010) describes 29 instances of death or harm from a manual defibrillator, however this is a different type of device, produced for professional rescuers, utilising metal paddles (although some are available with adhesive defibrillation pads.

All in all, AEDs are safe, effective and easy to use so why would you not want to place these in your workplace or public area?

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Defib as easy to use as a smartphone?

The latest scientific studies show the importance of the bystander as a first responder

(HealthNewsDigest.com) - Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) differs from a heart attack in a couple of important ways. First, SCA is the leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the Mayo Clinic, and is more common than heart attack. Second, SCA can be successfully treated by a bystander with an automated external defibrillator (AED), according to several peer-reviewed medical studies.

Virtually every day in America, AED technology enables an individual with little or no medical training to save the life of another human being. This fact makes SCA unique among other leading causes of death such as heart attack, stroke and cancer – afflictions that require interventions from medical professionals.

SCA is an arrhythmia – an electrical disorder of the heart – that can be corrected by a shock from an AED. Heart attack is caused by a blocked artery, which must be cleared or bypassed in a medical facility. Still, only about 8 percent of about 380,000 annual SCA victims in America survive to hospital discharge – primarily because they do not receive shocks quickly enough from an AED. This 8 percent survival rate is dismal, especially when compared to the roughly 85 percent survival rate of heart attack victims.

In any workplace, every employee can be and should be a potential lifesaver.

Too often, workers suffer SCA and die because a defibrillator is not available in time to save them. Conversely, about 90 percent of SCA victims who receive shocks within the first minute after arrest survive, according to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Association. The chances of survival decrease by 7 to 10 percent with each passing minute. After 10 minutes, less than 5 percent of victims survive.

The aggregate SCA survival rate, recorded across various populations, has remained around 8 percent for the past 30 years, according to a study published in the American Heart Association’s Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. However, the authors noted that survival was “greatest in locations in which a defibrillator is available.” They also said that because most out-of-hospital cardiac events are witnessed, efforts to improve survival should focus on the prompt use of an AED and CPR by those who witness the event.

While receiving AED/CPR training obviously has its benefits, a Johns Hopkins study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology emphasized that “speed is more important than training.” In a review of 13,759 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, the authors found an average survival rate of 7 percent. However, the survival rate increased to 38 percent when patients received an AED shock before EMS arrival. Non-medical volunteers operating the AED achieved the highest survival rate (40%), followed by healthcare workers (16%) and police (13%). “On average, early AED defibrillation before EMS arrival seems to nearly double a victim’s odds of survival after OHCA,” the authors wrote.

Speed saves

With speed recognized as the most important aspect of AED lifesaving, the focus shifts away from relying on EMS response to having AEDs available in workplaces and public places. While AED/CPR-trained individuals are sometimes present in these areas, SCA victims are often rescued by untrained bystanders.

These Good Samaritans use AEDs successfully, even though they may have never used them before. A survey of 1,018 travelers from 38 nations passing through the Amsterdam central railway station found that roughly half of these individuals would be willing to use an AED in an emergency. Among those expressing reluctance, the most common barriers to using an AED were a lack of knowledge of how to work the AED and concerns about harming the victim.

Approaching the tipping point to higher SCA survival

Today, AEDs are approaching a tipping point similar to the one that happened with the introduction of the iPhone. Before Apple launched this product, most consumers were intimidated by smart phones. The iPhone made smart phones easy – this innovation and its impact on other manufacturers made text and email by phone commonplace, turned mobile devices into the most common way to access the Internet, and merged it all with music, video and a world of apps. Now, many people manage their lives from their smart phone.

In a similar fashion, new AED technology merges audio, video, training and maintenance capabilities into an easy-to-use lifesaving device that inspires confidence in the minds of potential rescuers. A survey by AED designer and manufacturer Defibtech and Harris Interactive asked the question: In addition to audio instruction (provided by the AED during a rescue situation), what would give you greater confidence to use an AED? The answer? Video. With video, text and voice, 97 percent of the respondents said they would be able to use an AED to save a life.

In response, Defibtech introduced the VIEW AED, which has an innovative, exclusive LCD video feature that literally shows rescuers how to perform each step of an SCA rescue in real time – in accordance with the latest American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. The color video is reinforced by loud and clear audio and corresponding text that can be understood in noisy environments. For example, when the VIEW’s audio says and text reads, “Place pads on patient’s chest,” the video shows exactly where to place the pads.

The VIEW also has embedded help videos that can be used during training to review the critical steps of a rescue, providing reassurance to rescuers that they will be ready during the stress of an emergency. In addition to the help videos, the VIEW has a patented status screen that shows the readiness of defibrillation pads and the AED’s battery, as well as the overall AED operational status. The VIEW AED virtually maintains itself through automated daily self-tests. Choosing an AED that’s easy for bystanders to use is important because not all AEDs are created equal.

Enable your workers to rescue a fellow employee

From any standpoint, it makes complete sense to encourage and enable workers to rescue a fellow employee striken by the most common killer of Americans. While medical advances in virtually every area of medicine have reduced mortality rates, SCA mortality has remained the same for 30 years, even though it can be treated by a person with no medical training if there is an AED onsite. That fact alone calls for workplaces to have AEDs available and to empower their employees with the confidence to use them.

Greg Slusser is a vice president for Defibtech, the designer and manufacturer of the Lifeline™ and ReviveR™ families of AEDs and related accessories, Click Here 1-866-DEFIB-4-U (1-866-333-4248).

Abridged with permission from the August 2012 edition of Facility Safety Management magazine (www.fsmmag.com)

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Take heart - new schools will all get defibrillators, supported by Michael Gove

Take heart - new schools will all get defibrillators, supported by Michael Gove | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

ALL new schools are to be equipped with life-saving defibrillators to cut the number of child heart deaths.

The move, supported by Education Secretary Michael Gove, will be announced in Chancellor George Osborne’s Budget later this month.

More than 270 pupils die after suffering heart attacks at school every year but, according to charity SADS, only 80 of 30,000 schools have automated external defibrillators, which cost £1,500.

Sick youngsters given an electric shock to the heart with the life-saving devices are 50 per cent more likely to survive a coronary than those who have to wait for an ambulance. The odds in rural areas are 75 per cent.

The initiative is being spearheaded by Conservative MP Andrew Percy, a trained first responder who has helped raise funds to buy defibrillators for six schools in his Brigg and Goole constituency. It is backed by the British Heart Foundation, Red Cross, St John Ambulance and Oliver King Foundation.

Mr Percy told the Sunday Express: “It is a national scandal that children are dying unnecessarily in this country because there are not enough public access defibrillators. A relatively small one-off investment could have a lasting legacy, which is why for me it is a complete no-brainer.”

Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011.

A year after Oliver’s death his family set up the Oliver King Foundation, which wants to see defibrillators installed in all schools, sports centres and other public buildings.

Oliver’s father, Mark, said: “We are losing children who are fit and healthy every week to cardiac arrests.

“When my own son died we waited more than 20 minutes for the ambulance to arrive and it was a seven-minute journey to hospital. I know that had there been a defibrillator on site, he would be here today.

“My question to the Government is why is there a postcode lottery with ­children’s lives with there being defibrillators at some schools and not others?”

 

 

ALL new schools are to be equipped with life-saving defibrillators to cut the number of child heart deaths.By: Marco GiannangeliPublished: Sun, March 9, 2014   

Defibrillators will be supplied to schools to cut down child heart attack deaths [GETTY]

The move, supported by Education Secretary Michael Gove, will be announced in Chancellor George Osborne’s Budget later this month.

More than 270 pupils die after suffering heart attacks at school every year but, according to charity Sads, only 80 of 30,000 schools have automated external defibrillators, which cost £1,500.

Sick youngsters given an electric shock to the heart with the life-saving devices are 50 per cent more likely to survive a coronary than those who have to wait for an ambulance. The odds in rural areas are 75 per cent.

The initiative is being spearheaded by Conservative MP Andrew Percy, a trained first responder who has helped raise funds to buy defibrillators for six schools in his Brigg and Goole constituency. It is backed by the British Heart Foundation, Red Cross, St John Ambulance and Oliver King Foundation.

Mr Percy told the Sunday Express: “It is a national scandal that children are dying unnecessarily in this country because there are not enough public access defibrillators. A relatively small one-off investment could have a lasting legacy, which is why for me it is a complete no-brainer.”

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Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011

Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011.

A year after Oliver’s death his family set up the Oliver King Foundation, which wants to see defibrillators installed in all schools, sports centres and other public buildings.

Oliver’s father, Mark, said: “We are losing children who are fit and healthy every week to cardiac arrests.

“When my own son died we waited more than 20 minutes for the ambulance to arrive and it was a seven-minute journey to hospital. I know that had there been a defibrillator on site, he would be here today.

“My question to the Government is why is there a postcode lottery with ­children’s lives with there being defibrillators at some schools and not others?”

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AEDs can save lives, but units, knowledge to use them, scarce

Sudden cardiac arrest — when, without warning, the heart instantly stops beating — kills 350,000 Americans of various ages and occupations a year, according to the American Heart Association.

Yet now, with high school sports teams beginning their fall seasons, now is when we are most aware of these fatalities because of a tragic drama: A young football player in peak condition, who has never flunked a physical or shown the faintest symptom of cardiac problems, suddenly collapses.

Death is usually all but instantaneous — but it is not necessarily inevitable, not if a device called an Automated External Defibrillator, or AED, and someone willing to use it are close at hand.

Sudden cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack, which usually is caused by blocked arteries and often gives some advance warning. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the electrical impulses that control the heart suddenly misfire.

The mild electric shock from an AED “resets” the heart and allows it to resume normal function. Bystanders revive several thousand people this way each year. More widespread use of the devices could save at least 20,000 more, according to the American Red Cross.

Since their introduction in the 1950s, AEDs have become smaller, simpler and basically foolproof; in one study, sixth-graders mastered them quickly and easily. There are about 2.5 million AEDs in the country, far short of the 30 million experts say are needed just to cover metropolitan areas and far short of the Red Cross goal of having every person in America within four minutes of an AED.

There are no good reasons why AEDs are not now widely and readily available. They should be and the solution may require a certain amount of public outcry and political attention.

Uniform national standards need to replace the often complex and inconsistent state and local rules on where and how AEDs are placed — ordering that they be placed prominently, like fire extinguishers, and regularly maintained.

The AEDs should clearly display the good Samaritan legal exception — all states have them — that protects from liability for injury or wrongful death people who voluntarily and in good faith try to save a life.

Says one manufacturer of AEDs, “It’s kind of blunt, but the bottom line is that when you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re dead before you hit the ground. There’s no way you can cause that victim any more harm using that device. You’re trying to bring them back.”

Unlike TV hospital dramas, AEDs do not have paddles that administer massive jolts. Two adhesive leads attach to the chest and the shock, if the machine’s diagnostics say one is needed, scarcely causes the patient’s chest muscles to twitch — and the newer devices will talk the user through the process.

An American public that had no problem mastering smartphones should have even less difficulty with AEDs once they are highly visible and readily accessible.Click here to edit the title

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Understanding Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Understanding Sudden Cardiac Arrest | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Sudden cardiac arrest is often confused with a heart attack. Although a prior heart attack increases one’s risk for sudden cardiac arrest, the two are quite different, with distinct risk factors, treatment options and outcomes.

Anatomy of a Heart Attack

A circulation problem of the heart causes a heart attack when one or more of the arteries delivering blood to the heart are blocked. Oxygen in the blood cannot reach the heart muscle, and the heart muscle becomes damaged. You can think of a heart attack as a “plumbing problem” in the heart.

This damage to the heart muscle can lead to disturbances of the heart’s electrical system. And a malfunction of the heart’s electrical system may cause dangerously fast heart rhythms that can lead to sudden cardiac arrest.

Anatomy of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

In contrast to a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused by an “electrical problem” in the heart. It occurs when the heart’s lower chambers (ventricles) suddenly develop a rapid, irregular rhythm (ventricular fibrillation) causing the ventricles to quiver rather than contract. The chaotic quivering motion of the ventricles renders the heart an ineffective pump that can no longer supply the body and brain with oxygen.

Within seconds, the person loses consciousness and has no pulse. Only immediate emergency treatment, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and external defibrillation, can prevent death from sudden cardiac arrest. Time is key to surviving sudden cardiac arrest, with chances of survival decreasing about 10 percent every minute without defibrillation. The American Heart Association recommends defibrillation within five minutes of collapse or sooner.

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