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Film reconstructing how a defib saved a man's life aims to encourage more groups to install them

Film reconstructing how a defib saved a man's life aims to encourage more groups to install them | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

https://youtu.be/VjXTzSQ-b2Y

 

A VIDEO reconstructing how a man was saved by a heart-starting defibrillator will be used to encourage more organisations to install the life-saving machines.

Ian Hough features in the video, called Pulled Through, produced by drp Video for West Midlands Ambulance Service. The film shows what happened to him when he suffered a cardiac arrest.

Mr Hough is a rower but his heart stopped during a regatta at Stourport Boat Club on August 13, 2011.

The club had no defibrillator but luckily there was medical cover on site for the event and the medics leapt into action, using their own machine to re-start his heart in the vital few minutes before paramedics arrived.

Mr Hough, 59, made a full recovery and continues to row – but he says without the defibrillator he firmly believes he would not have lived to see his daughter or granddaughter again.

He said: "I was dead for seven minutes.

"Had this happened on a normal day I would be dead.

"A cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at any time and in any place. I was lucky it happened during the regatta when a defibrillator was on site."

Stourport Boat Club has since installed a machine, as have a number of organisations across the country, including many in Stafford, Stone and Rugeley. The public access defibrillators provide instructions on what to do in an emergency and can save lives.

Ambulance bosses hope the video will encourage even more organisations to do the same.

Cliff Medlicott, from the service, said: "I would encourage as many people as possible to see the film. It is a compelling reconstruction of what happened."

 

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Performing 38 minutes of CPR can save patient's life, study finds

Performing CPR for 38 minutes or longer can improve a patient’s chance of surviving cardiac arrest, a new study has found.

The findings, presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013, revealed that sustaining CPR that long also improves the chances that survivors will have normal brain function.

Cardiac arrest occurs when electrical impulses in the heart become rapid or chaotic, causing it to suddenly stop beating.

In the US, about 80 percent of cardiac arrests, nearly 288,000 people, occur outside of a hospital each year, and fewer than 10 percent survive.

Research has found that the early return of spontaneous circulation — the body pumping blood on its own — is important for people to survive cardiac arrest with normal brain function.

However, little research has focused on the period between cardiac arrest and any return of spontaneous circulation.

The Japanese Circulation Society Resuscitation Science Study group tracked all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Japan between 2005 and 2011.

The researchers studied how much time passed between survivors’ collapse and the return of spontaneous circulation, and how well brain function was preserved a month later.

Survivors were considered to have fared well neurologically if they were alert and able to return to normal activities, or if they had moderate disability but were well enough to work part-time in a sheltered environment or take part in daily activities independently.

“The time between collapse and return of spontaneous circulation for those who fared well was 13 minutes compared to about 21 minutes for those who suffered severe brain disability”, said Ken Nagao, M.D., Ph.D., professor and director-in-chief of the Department of Cardiology, CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care at Surugadai Nihon University Hospital in Tokyo.

After adjusting for other factors that can affect neurological outcomes, the researchers found that the odds of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without severe brain damage dropped 5 percent for every 60 seconds that passed before spontaneous circulation was restored.

Based on the relationship between favourable brain outcomes and the time from collapse to a return of spontaneous circulation, the researchers calculated that CPR lasting 38 minutes or more was advisable.

“It may be appropriate to continue CPR if the return of spontaneous circulation occurs for any period of time”, concluded Nagao.

 

 

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Grandfather saved by CPR training

Grandfather saved by CPR training | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

A GRANDFATHER has told how he would be "eternally grateful" to the woman who saved his life after he collapsed in a Falmouth restaurant.

John Ollernshaw, from Flushing, would have died if a member of staff from Princess Pavilion had not resuscitated him during a cardiac arrest in November.

John Ollernshaw and wife Sylvia, with Ceinwen Morgans, who performed CPR on him after he collapsed.

 

Catering team leader Ceinwen Morgans started CPR on the 82-year-old within minutes of the arrest, having been trained in first aid just a few weeks earlier.

Mr Ollernshaw said: "I guess I was in the right place at the right time.

 

"If it had happened somewhere else, who knows what the chances of finding someone who knew what to do would have been.

"I will be eternally grateful to that young lady and the fact she had completed the first aid course."

Mr Ollernshaw's wife, Sylvia, credited Ms Morgans with saving his life.

"He went straight down and the girl just started resuscitating him immediately until the paramedics came," she said. "She cracked two of his ribs in the process and she had to keep going for a considerable amount of time. It was that which saved his life.

"We have been told that if the waitress hadn't been trained he would have died before the paramedic arrived.

"It was just amazing really, it seemed like it was just instinctive for her which was marvellous."

It was the first time Ms Morgans, from Falmouth, had put her training into practical use since completing the course. She said: "It all just happened so quickly and luckily I knew what to do. Nothing can prepare you for the real thing. I think my adrenalin carried me through and I was able to just get on with it but afterwards it was a little bit traumatising.

"If there hadn't been someone like me there that day then John would have died and his family would have faced Christmas and the new year without him."

Mr Ollernshaw, a dad of two and grandfather of three, had to be defibrillated on the way to the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro. In the ambulance, his wife was warned he was unlikely to survive the night.

"Our local vicar came with me to the hospital and by the time we got there the staff had managed to get him going on the machines because he wasn't able to do it himself," said Mrs Ollernshaw.

He remained on life support for four days before he was able to breathe on his own, then spent almost a month in hospital, during which he underwent heart-bypass surgery.

Alison Brown, cardiac rehab nurse at the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust, said: "It is fantastic that he was in a public place where there was someone who had been recently trained in CPR."

 

 

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