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Rules change for reporting accidents at work - People Management Magazine Online

The price for failing to report accidents or provide first-aid is potentially high

Under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR), employers must report any work-related deaths, and certain work-related injuries, cases of disease, and near misses involving employees

Employers must also ensure that they provide suitably trained personnel and have adequate equipment and facilities for giving first-aid to employees who are injured or become ill at work. This is a requirement under the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (as amended) (FAR).

Changes to the law

Changes to both RIDDOR and FAR introduced on 1 October 2013 aim to simplify reporting requirements by removing some of the ambiguity that existed previously.

The mechanism for reporting under RIDDOR remains unchanged. Employers are still required to report relevant accidents to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) within a reasonable time frame.

The main changes include:

a shorter list of ‘specified injuries’, instead of the ‘classification of major injuries’eight categories of ‘work related illnesses’, rather than 47 reportable industrial diseases.fewer ‘dangerous occurrences’ that require reporting

There is still a requirement under FAR to provide adequate first-aid cover, facilities and equipment. However the HSE will no longer approve first-aid providers. This means that employers themselves will need to make sure that training providers can prove their competence in relation to FAR.

Which trainer?

An advantage of the change in the regulations is that rather than running HSE approved courses, some training providers can now provide bespoke, industry specific first aid training. This makes it vitally important that they are appropriately qualified but it is also advisable to retain trainers with experience in your industry so that the training can be tailored to specific risks.

Training providers should be able to produce the following documentation to aid in establishing their competence and relevant experience:

a current First Aid at Work certificate (or exemption if applicable)a documented quality assurance plana brief of what the syllabus covers.

Training providers previously approved by the HSE are always a good option, as are trainers approved by organisations such as Ofqual.

Checklist

In relation to RIDDOR not much has changed. However, employers need to:

obtain a copy of the new legislation related to RIDDOR, which can be found at www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2013/1471/contents/made, and gives a list of the new categories for reporting – an invaluable tool for ensuring the right type of incident is reported;ensure that all H&S representatives and any H&S committees are aware of and trained in these new categories.

In relation to FAR, employers should ensure that:

trainers are competent in first aid and hold appropriate qualifications;training organisations have quality assurance plans for auditing their training;training providers demonstrate that they work to accepted training standards;first-aid courses are taught in accordance with recognised and accepted first aid practice;first-aid training courses are relevant to the organisation’s industry;appropriate certificates are issued to assessed students;

Employers would also be well advised to ask for recommendations or feedback from previous training sessions.

Comment

Companies have been successfully prosecuted for failing to report accidents in accordance with RIDDOR or for not reporting them in a timely manner. Getting it wrong can be costly. In R v Nicholls & Clarke Glass Ltd, the company was fined £11,200.

Prosecutions under FAR are rare. The case of R v TS (UK) Ltd resulted from a fatal accident where there were no first-aiders to give initial treatment prior to the arrival of paramedics. As well as receiving a £130,000 fine under the Health and Safety at Work Act. 1974, the company was also fined £10,000 for the first aid offence. 

Making sure that there are appropriately trained first-aiders on hand will not only help you avoid such penalties but could also have a considerable impact on employees’ injuries or suffering.

Semra Zack-Williams is a Health & Safety Specialist and Stuart Jones is Head of Employment at Weightmans

Further information can be found at www.hse.gov.uk

 

 

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Changes to first aid regulations come into effect

Businesses now have more flexibility in how they manage their provision of first aid in the workplace following a change in health and safety regulations.

As of today (1 October 2013), the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 have been amended, removing the requirement for HSE to approve first aid training and qualifications.

The change is part of HSE's work to reduce the burden on businesses and put common sense back into health and safety, whilst maintaining standards. The changes relating to first aid apply to businesses of all sizes and from all sectors.

Andy McGrory, HSE's policy lead for First Aid, said: "HSE no longer approves first-aid training and qualifications. Removing the HSE approval process will give businesses greater flexibility to choose their own training providers and first aid training that is right for their work place, based on their needs assessment and their individual business needs.

"Employers still have a legal duty to make arrangements to ensure their employees receive immediate attention if they are injured or taken ill at work."

Information, including the regulations document and a guidance document to help employers identify and select a competent training provider to deliver any first-aid training indicated by their first-aid needs assessment are available on the HSE website at http://www.hse.gov.uk/firstaid/.

HSE will continue to set the standards for training. While the changes give employers flexibility, the one day Emergency First Aid at Work (EFAW) and three day First Aid at Work (FAW) courses remain the building blocks for first aid training.

As part of the changes, the Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) text which was previously included in guidance document L74 (which consisted of only 12 sentences), has been incorporated into the new guidance. The advice in the guidance sets out clearly the recommended practical actions needed, and the standards to be achieved, to ensure compliance with duties under the 1981 Regulations. This is intended as a comprehensive guide on ensuring compliance with the law.

 

 

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Injury Reporting Changes Take Effect in UK -- Occupational Health & Safety

Injury Reporting Changes Take Effect in UK -- Occupational Health & Safety | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Business owners in the United Kingdom can breathe easier—two regulations took effect on Oct. 1 that will help them comply with health and safety regulations, according to a news release from HSE.

The first change is an amendment to the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981. The change removes the requirement for HSE to approve first aid training and qualifications, giving business owners much more flexibility. The change is part of HSE's attempt to "reduce the burden on businesses and put common sense back into health and safety," according to the agency.

The second legislative change is to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995. The new change clarifies and simplifies the reporting requirements while also ensuring that the data gives an accurate and useful picture of workplace incidents. Specifically, the changes include different classification of major injuries (a shorter list of specified injuries is used), eight categories for industrial disease instead of 47 types, and fewer types of occurrences that need to be reported.

For more information, visit http://www.hse.gov.uk/press/2013/hse-legislation-changes.htm.

 

 

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HSE launches consultation on first aid changes for employers

HSE launches consultation on first aid changes for employers | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has launched a consultation on the proposed removal of the requirement for it to approve first aid training and qualifications. It also plans to review the content of the associated Approved Code of Practice to support employers with these changes.

The review is aimed at making it easier for businesses and other users to understand what they can do to comply with health and safety law, following recommendations made in Professor Ragnar Löfstedt's independent review of health and safety legislation.

The HSE wants to hear employers' views on what guidance would be useful to them in assessing what first aid provision they need for their particular circumstances, and in selecting training providers.

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