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Lifesaving Defibrillators Often Behind Locked Doors, Study Finds

Lifesaving Defibrillators Often Behind Locked Doors, Study Finds | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Devices that shock heart rhythm back to normal were not available 25 percent of time in emergencies

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Scottish Dentists to be given defibrillators

Scottish Dentists to be given defibrillators | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Defibrillators are to be installed in every Scottish NHS dental practice.

The £1m Scottish government scheme aims to boost the survival chances for people who have cardiac arrests.

The 970 defibrillators will also be mapped by ambulance staff so call handlers can direct people to the nearest one while patients wait for paramedics to arrive.

More than 1,500 Scots died in the community last year after suffering a cardiac arrest.

A defibrillator can be used by anyone to deliver an electric shock to the chest to restore a person's heart to a normal rhythm after a cardiac arrest.

'Every second counts'

Ministers said that currently, only 5% of people who have a cardiac arrest in the community survive and every minute of delay cuts their chances.

Public Health Minister Michael Matheson said: "Every second counts when someone's heart goes into cardiac arrest and having access to a defibrillator can mean the difference between life and death.

"As these machines are becoming easier to use it is only right that the public have more access to its life-saving potential in any public place.

"There are almost 1,000 NHS dental practices in the centre of Scottish communities. By giving them this equipment we are providing 1,000 more chances to save a life.

"I believe that this investment will save many more lives."

The machines are expected to be in place by the end of August.

Any dental practice which has already bought a defibrillator will be compensated.

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Villagers turn old phone box into mini A&E with life-saving machine

Villagers turn old phone box into mini A&E with life-saving machine | First Aid Training | Scoop.it
A DEFIBRILLATOR has been installed in a rural red call box after locals bought the kiosk from BT for a pound.

AN old phone box has been transformed into a potential lifesaver after being purchased by villagers for £1.

A defibrillator, which gives the heart an electric shock in some cases of cardiac arrest, has been installed in the red call box.

And as the nearest accident and emergency department is 20 minutes' drive away, the machine could mean the difference between life and death.

The call box in Arnprior, Stirlingshire, was bought by the community from British Telecom under the company’s Adopt a Kiosk scheme.

Funding for the defibrillator came from various organisations, including Stirling Council and the Sandpiper Trust, who aim to provide Scotland’s rural doctors and nurses with emergency medical equipment.

A BT spokesman said: “We’re very pleased to hear that the villagers of Arnprior have found a new lease of life for one of our old, rarely used boxes.

“Over the years, many people have described their local phone box as a lifeline. Now that everyone has a phone at home or a mobile, that’s no longer true.

“But kiosks fitted with defibrillator machines could be real life savers for the community in the future.”

The Scottish Ambulance Service and the Community Heartbeat Trust, a charity dedicated to the provision of defibrillation services to local communities, gave their help to the project.

Backing also came from the community council and Stirling Council’s Community Pride fund. Villagers were given advice and training on how to use the defribillator.

And children from the local primary school will be on hand to help open the lifesaving installation on Monday.

A spokesman for the Sandpiper Trust said they were delighted to have been involved in the Arnprior project.

He said: “It has become increasingly clear over the past decade since the trust was set up that working together with all these organisations is what saves lives.

“We are also pleased that the children of Arnprior School have been involved in this project.”

More than 100 traditional red kiosks in Scotland have been adopted by their local communities for £1.

Arnprior is the second community in Scotland to have a defibrillator fitted in their call box.

Glendaruel Village, Argyll, was the first in 2011.

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'Cough CPR'

The BLS/AED Subcommittee has received a number of enquiries from people who have been informed about "cough CPR" and "How to survive a heart attack when alone". Advice has been put on the Internet that someone who thinks he or she is suffering a heart attack should repeatedly cough and go at once to a hospital, by car if necessary.

This advice is based (very loosely) on published case reports of people being able to maintain some sort of cardiac output during cardiac arrest by vigorous coughing - so-called "cough CPR". The scenario has usually been of a patient developing ventricular fibrillation whilst being monitored, often whilst undergoing cardiac catheterisation. The patient has been encouraged to cough and a measurable circulation has been recorded. This anecdotal evidence supports the theory that chest compressions during CPR are successful because they increase intrathoracic pressure and result in a flow of blood. The collapsed veins and patent arteries at the thoracic inlet result in this flow being in a forward direction. Coughing produces the same effect.

The BLS/AED Subcommittee knows of no evidence that, even if a lone patient knew that cardiac arrest had occurred, he or she would be able to maintain sufficient circulation to allow activity, let alone driving to the hospital.

December 2005
Reviewed August 2010
 
 
References:

Criley JM, Blaufuss JH, Kissel GL. Cough-induced cardiac compression: self-administered form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. JAMA. 1976;236:1246-1250.
 Miller B, Cohen A, Serio A, Bettock D. Hemodynamics of cough cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a patient with sustained torsades de pointes/ventricular flutter. J Emerg Med. 1994;12:627-632.
 Petelenz T, Iwinski J, Chelbowczyx J, Czyx Z, Flak Z, Fiutowski L, Zaorski K, Petelenz T, Zeman S. Self-administered cough cardiopulmonary resuscitation (c-CPR) in patients threatened by MAS events of cardiovascular origin. Wiad Lek. 1998;51:326-336.
 Saba SE, David SW. Sustained consciousness during ventricular fibrillation: case report of cough cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cathet Cardiovasc Diagn. 1996;37:47-48.
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Half of people not confident about administering CPR, survey finds

Half of people not confident about administering CPR, survey finds | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

bout half of people in Scotland do not feel confident administering CPR if needed in an emergency, a survey has found.

Fear of causing an injury (22%) and lack of skills (19%) were the top reasons, closely followed by being put off by visible vomit or blood (19%) and indications the person is a drug user (16%).

A fear of being sued (8%) or catching a disease (10%) were also cited in the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) report by the Open University for the Scottish Government.

The study was set up to explore ways of improving people's understanding and knowledge of emergency CPR.

It states that survival rates from OHCA in Scotland currently stand at 5% and those who receive CPR from a bystander before professionals arrive are "far more likely to survive to hospital discharge than those who do not".

The survey of more than 1,000 people found 77% think everyone should be CPR trained but just 52% are.

Of those trained, 44% did so over five years ago and just 28% within the last year.

The majority of respondents who were CPR-trained received it because it was a requirement of their employment or was offered to them through voluntary work.

The study found that the older a person is, the less likely or willing they were to be CPR-trained.

The report said: "These findings are particularly relevant considering that most OHCA happen in the homes of older people."

Employment was also an influential factor identified among people who had CPR training.

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It is Not Possible to Swallow Your Tongue

It is Not Possible to Swallow Your Tongue | First Aid Training | Scoop.it
Myth: It is possible to swallow your tongue.

Contrary to popular belief, it is not possible to swallow your tongue. Well, unless of course if you cut it off and then swallowed it… In any event, the tongue is rooted to the floor of the mouth by the lingual frenulum. This makes getting the tongue far enough back in the throat to actually swallow it and get it stuck impossible.

Also contrary to popular belief, one of the worst things a person can try to do for a someone having a seizure is to try to jam something in their mouth to hold their tongue down. They aren’t going to swallow their tongue and someone trying to jam something in their mouth is very likely going to end up injuring them and, depending on what the person used, the seizure victim might just choke on what was jammed in their mouth. The person trying to force the thing in their mouth can also end up getting their fingers bitten severely, if they aren’t careful, and it’s hard to be careful when someone’s jerking about.

Depending on the size of someone’s tongue and where the lingual frenulum is attached, it is possible for a person having a seizure to have temporary blocking of the airway from the tongue; when they are having a seizure, the tongue can fully relax and fall back. However, this isn’t particularly a problem while they are having a seizure as breathing is usually suppressed anyways. It can be a little bit of a problem when the seizure is over and their breathing resumes. However, a more likely choking hazard for someone having a seizure or unconscious is the person’s own bodily fluids, including saliva and vomit, which they may breathe in once their breathing resumes; this can cause them to choke on these fluids, due to a suppressed coughing reflex while they are unconscious.

In these cases though, all you have to do is turn them on their side. The tongue will then naturally fall to the side of their mouth (gravity works!) and their bodily fluids won’t run back down their throat, in both cases, freeing up the airway.

Bonus Facts:

For a seizure victim, rolling them on their left side is the preferred position. I was not able to ascertain why this was the case, but it was recommended by the epilepsy foundation.You should also never try to restrain the person having a seizure. Roll them on their left side and then move objects away from them, so that they don’t injure themselves on those objects. But otherwise, you just have to let the seizure run its course.The lingual frenulum is the small mucous membrane that extends from the floor of the mouth to the mid-line of the tongue.In some people, this lingual frenulum can be so restrictive, in terms of restricting the movement of the tongue, that they can have trouble speaking. When this happens, it is known as Ankyloglossia, or “tongue-tie”. Often these people cannot even extend the tip of their tongue beyond their front teeth. This is particularly a problem for babies with this condition as they have trouble breast feeding, thus trouble taking in enough food.The base of the lingual frenlum contains tissue that has a series of saliva glands on it. The two largest of these are called the Wharton’s Ducts and are in the front.The tongue isn’t just one muscle, as many people say, “the strongest muscle… etc.” In fact, it’s made up of many muscles, which allows for the great range of movement most people have with it, with the muscles running in different directions.As you age, the number of taste buds you have tend to diminish. An average child is born with about 10,000 taste buds. An average elderly person only has about 5,000. This is partially why many kids hate vegetables so much. Vegetables can be very bitter to “super tasters” or those close to that. As you age and your taste buds diminish, this bitter flavor goes away somewhat and changes the taste of the vegetables dramatically in the process.The tongue never really gets a rest. Even while you are sleeping it is constantly pushing saliva into the throat, making sure you don’t drool all over your pillows.
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Practices lack vital lifesaving kits | Dentistry.co.uk

Practices lack vital lifesaving kits | Dentistry.co.uk | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Health industry’s defibrillators would go ignored in a genuine emergency, survey finds

A new survey reveals that many dental practices are without key lifesaving equipment.

More than half of the staff polled were unaware if their practices were kitted out with a defibrillator.

Dentistry figured among the health industry survey which also highlights a need for more education to rid misplaced fears about misuse.
 
The survey shows that 54% of staff in workplaces such as dental surgeries and GP practices stated that their premises either do not have, or that they are not aware that they have, a defibrillator.

Of those questioned that do have defibrillators, 36% do not know how or would not be confident enough to use it.
 
This raises fears that this emergency heart equipment may not be used in the places where it is most needed.
 
Vincent Mathieu, managing director of DOC UK calls for more education for health service providers: “With 124,000 heart attacks a year in the UK touching people of all ages and physical conditions, defibrillators are essential equipment – and you expect the health industry to set the gold standard. However, defibrillators do no good if they are not used. It’s vital that companies within the health industry sector have an on-site defibrillator that their staff will be confident to use in case of an emergency.”
 
The survey indicated that the general apprehension about using emergency equipment is based on risks that do not exist. For instance, a defibrillator will only work on someone who is having a genuine cardiac arrest. 48% per cent of respondents were concerned about injuring the casualty or being held liable if something went wrong. This is alarming as the equipment will only function on people who are having a cardiac arrest, and there have been no cases of people being sued for using a defibrillator.
 
Dr Stephan Van Wyk, a dentist at The Bridge Dental Centre, East Twickenham, highlights the importance of defibrillators in dental practices which are high stress environments.

He said: 'Although we are not required to have a defibrillator at the practice, it is a recommendation for dentists and regarded as best practice. We hope that we never have to use it, but we see having the defibrillator as an extension of our customer service, it’s an added extra to help make our customers feel comfortable and reassured.'
 
DOC’s defibrillators work by connecting the user to a call centre staffed with medically trained personnel who guide the user through the defibrillation process, removing the need for training, and removing the fear factor should an emergency occur.

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