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Lifesaving Defibrillators Often Behind Locked Doors, Study Finds

Lifesaving Defibrillators Often Behind Locked Doors, Study Finds | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Devices that shock heart rhythm back to normal were not available 25 percent of time in emergencies

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Study shows public access defibrillators are increasing survival but are not being used enough

New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia shows that use of public access defibrillation on people suffering cardiac arrest is associated with a large increase in chances of survival. However, despite the great potential, publicly accessible Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are not being used enough, concludes research by Dr Marianne Agerskov and colleagues at Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Publicly accessible AEDs are now commonplace in many European countries, and they are often found in sport centres, transportation hubs, and other public places. In Denmark, an online network owned by the foundation TrygFonden, contains detailed information about AED location and accessibility on all AEDs voluntarily registered in the network by AED owners. The Emergency Medical Dispatch Centres (EMD) across the country are linked to the network, enabling them to refer cardiac arrest witnesses to the nearest accessible AED. The network has provided a unique opportunity to assess the use and effects of public access defibrillation in Copenhagen.

In this study, the authors determined: (1) the proportion of AEDs applied to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims before arrival of the ambulance; and (2) the proportion of AEDs referred to by the EMD. When the dispatcher at the EMD suspects a cardiac arrest, they are able, through the network, to refer the witness to/explain on the phone where the nearest accessible AED is. The research team also assessed 30-day survival and characteristics of OHCA-victims.

The researchers identified a total of 521 patients with OHCA from the Mobile Emergency Care Unit and the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry between 2011 and 2013. They obtained Electrocardiogram-downloads from all applied AEDs. Information regarding AED-referral by the EMD was obtained from the nationwide AED Network.

An AED was applied to an OHCA-victim before ambulance arrival in 20/521 (3.8%) cases, and 13/521 (2.5%) OHCA-victims were defibrillated by an AED. To explain further: an AED was applied in 20 cases of cardiac arrest, but the AED only defibrillates (delivers one or more shocks) when it registers a "shockable rhythm". In case of cardiac arrest, the heart either has some "electricity" left, which means the muscle is still working, but in an unsynchronised way, so that it can't deliver blood to the rest of the body. In that case, a shock delivered by a defibrillator sort of "resets" the heart so it again beats synchronized. In other cases, the heart has an unshockable rhythm which means no electricity and it can't be defibrillated by an AED, the only chance to get the heart beating is by performing chest compressions and hope that the heart will get some electricity so that it can be defibrillated. An AED only works when it can deliver a shock, and the data in this study showed that an AED was actually valuable in the 13 out of 20 cases where it was applied, underscoring their eligibility. Thirteen of the 20 people who had an AED applied had a shockable rhythm, and thus received one or more shocks from the AED. In six cases, the member of the public was guided to the AED by the dispatcher.

The data showed that the 30-day survival for all patients, regardless of initial rhythm, was 50% for patients with an AED applied and 19% for patients without an AED applied. For OHCA with an initial shockable rhythm (meaning they could directly benefit from the applied AED) 30-day survival was 64% with an AED applied versus 47% without.

The authors conclude: "Members of the public were only directed to the nearest AED for a minor proportion of OHCA victims, but there was a significantly higher survival in patients where an AED was applied before EMS arrival. This indicates the life-saving potential and need to further develop public access defibrillation networks."

They add that during recent years, Denmark has seen an increased use of AEDs, which might reflect several initiatives taken to raise survival after OHCA in Denmark including; implementation of mandatory resuscitation training in elementary schools and when acquiring a driver's licence, improving the telephone guidance to bystanders witnessing a cardiac arrest, by using health care professionals to receive calls at the EMD, as nurses or experienced ambulance rescuers trained to recognise cardiac arrests and to guide the callers to perform chest compressions and use an AED until ambulance arrives.

Discussing some changes that they would like to see in the future, the authors say: "There has been a large increase in the number of publicly accessible AEDs. Means to increase AED utilisation should target public awareness of the AED network and the location of the AEDs, CPR and AED training, and further development of the existing AED network and linkage to the emergency medical dispatch system."


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Thousands of cardiac arrest victims die needlessly

Thousands of cardiac arrest victims die needlessly | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

A new survey has found almost a fifth of Brits don't know what it is and 45 per cent are not confident enough to perform it

Thousands of Brits are needlessly dying from cardiac arrests because too many people have no idea how to perform CPR, experts warn.

A new study has found that almost a fifth of Brits - 18% - do not know what CPR is and 60% have never been trained how to do it.

Experts say that if CPR was made compulsory at secondary schools, up to 5,000 lives a year could be saved.

Catherine Kelly, director of prevention, survival and support at the British Heart Foundation, said: “In the UK, less than 1 in 10 people survive an out of hospital cardiac arrest.

“However in Norway, where CPR is taught in secondary schools, the survival figure is as high as one in four.

“That’s why it’s the BHF’s ambition to teach CPR to all young people in secondary schools across the UK.

“Training secondary school children in CPR could help to save lives. If we achieve the survival rates seen in countries where secondary school training is mandatory we could contribute to helping save an additional 5,000 lives each year.”

The research by ITV’s Good Morning Britain reveals that just under half - 45% - of us do not feel confident to carry out CPR on someone who has had a cardiac arrest.

A third - 35% - said they would be worried that attempting CPR could make things worse.

The OnePoll survey for Good Morning Britain was commissioned to launch of the Heels 4 Hearts campaign, which aims to give pupils in UK secondary schools and sixth forms the opportunity to learn CPR.

Heels 4 Hearts, which is supported by the British Heart Foundation, aims to encourage the public to donate unwanted shoes to BHF shops during the campaign. Money raised by the shoes will help fund CPR kits for schools.

Throughout this week on Good Morning Britain, presenters will hear from people whose lives have been saved by CPR, meet pupils who are being taught CPR skills and interview celebrities with personal experience of heart disease.

Other findings from the survey of 5,000 people revealed that eight out of ten - 83% - people agree it should be compulsory to learn CPR in school.

Also 40% of those asked believed ovarian or breast cancer was the biggest single killer of women when in fact coronary heart disease kills three times as many women as breast cancer.

Celebrities including Sir Tom Jones, Dame Kelly Holmes and Dame Helen Mirren have already pledged their support for Heels 4 Hearts and will be donating shoes to the campaign.

Ms Kelly, of the BHF, added: “It’s shocking that 60% of the population have not been trained in CPR and that 45% do not feel confident to carry out CPR on someone who has had a cardiac arrest.

“Knowing how to react when you’re faced with a cardiac arrest can mean the difference between life and death. That’s why we’re urging everyone to donate their unwanted shoes to the Heels 4 Hearts campaign which will go towards funding CPR kits for secondary schools in the UK.”

Good Morning Britain’s Dr Hilary Jones said: “These findings don’t surpriseme but are disappointing because being able to carry out CPR undoubtedly saves lives and is so easy to do.

“In countries where it is taught in schools people who need CPR have more than double the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest then in the UK despite heart disease being the biggest killer in our country.

“Learning CPR and having a simple to use defibrillator in public places would make a huge difference to heart attack outcomes. I am passionate about this campaign and together we can all make a difference and become lifesavers.”

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Faulty heart defibrillators costing lives, monitoring agency warns

Faulty heart defibrillators costing lives, monitoring agency warns | First Aid Training | Scoop.it
Up to a quarter of defibrillators installed in public places don't work, according to the agency in charge of registering the equipment.

The Automated External Defibrillator Deployment Agency has launched a new set of guidelines in an effort to stop flat batteries and software malfunctions in the units.

The agency's Graeme Pell said electronic defibrillators in workplaces, sporting clubs and other public places did not always work.

"There's nothing more frustrating than coming across somebody who's got a sudden cardiac arrest who clearly needs urgent defibrillation to save their lives and find that the defibrillator that you have in your hand, or in fact can't locate, simply won't do the job," he said.

In the United States, research has found that up to a quarter of equipment installed in public areas at any time did not work because of flat batteries, damage or software malfunctions.

Mr Peel estimated the figures were similar in Australia.

"Probably 20 to 25 per cent of defibrillators aren't working," he said.

"We also know that unless you get fibrillation on a sudden cardiac arrest patient within the first couple of minutes, then their chance of survival is very remote.

"Anecdotally, we believe that there probably are people dying unnecessarily."

Up to 33,000 Australians die from sudden cardiac arrest every year.

The agency today released a set of guidelines that helps businesses and organisations make sure equipment was ready for use in an emergency.

It is also setting a up voluntary register to keep track of all defibrillators around the country.

Mr Peel said there was one positive change already underway - defibrillators were becoming easier to use.

"You open it up and it talks to you. It'll tell you pull out the pads, where the pads have to be located and connections then basically you stand back and wait," he said.

"The battery's got to be working, the pads have got to stick, software has got to be functioning.

"There's been a huge amount of enthusiasm but not as much standardisation."

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Fulford & District Community First Responders support local life saving initiatives. | The Stone and Eccleshall Gazette

Residents from the Fulford and district area attended free, two hour Heart Start & Defibrillator awareness courses on Sunday 29th June 2014.

They learnt vital lifesaving skills, which could help keep a person alive until medical help arrives.

The course was provided by Mike Taylor (of Abacus Training), David Thomas and Mel Avis, who are all volunteer responders with the Fulford & District Community First Responder charity. ‘Heart Start’ is a national scheme that is being supported by the West Midlands Ambulance Service across Staffordshire, in association with the British Heart Foundation.

Mel Avis explained,

“24 local people were trained in basic life saving skills today. Our aim was two-fold: to raise awareness of the Community Public Access Defibrillator that has recently been installed at Fulford Village Hall and to teach skills that could make an enormous difference to saving someone’s life. It was a great success!”

Participants attending Fulford & District Heart Start and Defibrillator Awareness workshop on Sunday 29th June 2014, outside the village hall, with Heart Start trainer, Mike Taylor.

Acting quickly when someone is in cardiac arrest is crucially important. Early CPR and Early Defibrillation significantly increase a person’s chance of survival. People should not be afraid to learn how to use a cPAD. They are designed specifically for use in community settings and provide a series of voice prompts and illuminated illustrations to guide the rescuer.

“Any initiatives, whether it’s community life saving training or new devices such as the cPAD, are welcome additions to our local communities, saving vital minutes whilst the ambulance service arrives, especially in rural villages.”

says Mike Taylor (of Abacus Training).

“The course was excellent and I now feel confident that I could deal with an emergency while waiting for the professionals to arrive…. If you get the opportunity then get trained up!”

says participant, Sarah Cox

“Training was excellent, easy to understand and remember. Do it and be useful to someone who may need your help.”

says participant, Jacqui Leach

For more information about First Aid courses or the Heart Start scheme, please contact: Mike@fulfordanddistrictcfr.co.uk or visit www.abacustraining.co.uk

Special thanks to:
The Fulford Village Hall cPAD has been part funded through a scheme with the British Heart Foundation. However, it would not have been at all possible without the support and fundraising efforts of a lot of local organisations, groups and local individuals. We would like to extend special thanks to: The Cheadle Round Table, Blythe Bridge Rotary Club, Fulford & District Community CFRs, the Fulford Village Hall Committee, Mr & Mrs Ostrouchow, Mr C Bloor, Ms J Lawton, Mrs W Godfrey and Mrs J Tarr, Headteacher at Fulford Primary School.

About Fulford & District Community First Responders:
Fulford and District Community First Responders are a busy and dedicated group of volunteers who have responded to over 2000 emergency calls with the West Midlands Ambulance Service, since the group formed in July 2008. We run weekly pub quizzes to raise money for our charity, please check our Facebook page for details and come along! If you are able to make a donation or host a fundraising event for us, please contact Chad Bloor (Group fundraiser) 07535313132 or David Steele (Group Coordinator) 07946185945.

Fulford & District CFRs can be followed on Facebook and Twitter @FulfordCFR

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Scottish Dentists to be given defibrillators

Scottish Dentists to be given defibrillators | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Defibrillators are to be installed in every Scottish NHS dental practice.

The £1m Scottish government scheme aims to boost the survival chances for people who have cardiac arrests.

The 970 defibrillators will also be mapped by ambulance staff so call handlers can direct people to the nearest one while patients wait for paramedics to arrive.

More than 1,500 Scots died in the community last year after suffering a cardiac arrest.

A defibrillator can be used by anyone to deliver an electric shock to the chest to restore a person's heart to a normal rhythm after a cardiac arrest.

'Every second counts'

Ministers said that currently, only 5% of people who have a cardiac arrest in the community survive and every minute of delay cuts their chances.

Public Health Minister Michael Matheson said: "Every second counts when someone's heart goes into cardiac arrest and having access to a defibrillator can mean the difference between life and death.

"As these machines are becoming easier to use it is only right that the public have more access to its life-saving potential in any public place.

"There are almost 1,000 NHS dental practices in the centre of Scottish communities. By giving them this equipment we are providing 1,000 more chances to save a life.

"I believe that this investment will save many more lives."

The machines are expected to be in place by the end of August.

Any dental practice which has already bought a defibrillator will be compensated.

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The FINANCIAL - Poll Reveals Nearly 80 Percent of Employed Adults Can’t Locate Their Workplace’s Defibrillator

The FINANCIAL - Poll Reveals Nearly 80 Percent of Employed Adults Can’t Locate Their Workplace’s Defibrillator | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

The FINANCIAL -- Each year, approximately 300,000 people suffer out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrests (SCA) that require revival from an automated external defibrillator (AED). Although many workplaces have AEDs on site, it’s likely that a majority of workers would not be prepared to locate and use the units, according to the results of a survey commissioned by Cintas Corporation, one of the leaders in first-aid and safety programs.

 

The survey, conducted online by Harris Interactive among 2,019 adults ages 18 and older (of whom 916 are employed), found that 79 percent of employed adults do not know where their workplace’s AED is located.


“The American Red Cross says that bystanders could save at least 20,000 additional SCA victims each year with more widespread use of AEDs,” said Jamie Samide, Senior Director of Marketing, Cintas. “Our survey suggests that this may be a challenge unless more organizations partner with a first aid provider like Cintas to ensure AEDs are properly installed and maintained. Organizations must also train their employees to know how to recognize the symptoms of SCA and find and use the units,” Samide added.

The September 2013 survey indicates that many workplaces need to make AEDs more available. Thirty percent of employed U.S. adults note that their workplace does not have an AED on site. Merely having an AED on-site, however, is only the first step. Organizations also need to train their employees on the use of AEDs to improve employee confidence and skills in situations involving them. Of employed U.S. adults:

Less than 1 in 5 (17 percent) feel confident that they could reach the nearest AED in their workplace and return to the victim quicklyEighty-six percent would not feel comfortable using the AED during an emergency such as cardiac arrestEighty-eight percent have not received training on the proper use of the workplace AED


“Too often, we find that workplaces believe having an AED on site is an adequate precaution in regards to SCA,” added Samide. “To increase confidence and effectiveness during an emergency, organizations should work with a safety provider that offers AEDs, tests and inspections, and training, to save time and ensure ongoing safety and compliance.”

Mike Taylor's insight:

An article from the US, but I can't see the UK being much different.

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Grandfather saved by CPR training

Grandfather saved by CPR training | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

A GRANDFATHER has told how he would be "eternally grateful" to the woman who saved his life after he collapsed in a Falmouth restaurant.

John Ollernshaw, from Flushing, would have died if a member of staff from Princess Pavilion had not resuscitated him during a cardiac arrest in November.

John Ollernshaw and wife Sylvia, with Ceinwen Morgans, who performed CPR on him after he collapsed.

 

Catering team leader Ceinwen Morgans started CPR on the 82-year-old within minutes of the arrest, having been trained in first aid just a few weeks earlier.

Mr Ollernshaw said: "I guess I was in the right place at the right time.

 

"If it had happened somewhere else, who knows what the chances of finding someone who knew what to do would have been.

"I will be eternally grateful to that young lady and the fact she had completed the first aid course."

Mr Ollernshaw's wife, Sylvia, credited Ms Morgans with saving his life.

"He went straight down and the girl just started resuscitating him immediately until the paramedics came," she said. "She cracked two of his ribs in the process and she had to keep going for a considerable amount of time. It was that which saved his life.

"We have been told that if the waitress hadn't been trained he would have died before the paramedic arrived.

"It was just amazing really, it seemed like it was just instinctive for her which was marvellous."

It was the first time Ms Morgans, from Falmouth, had put her training into practical use since completing the course. She said: "It all just happened so quickly and luckily I knew what to do. Nothing can prepare you for the real thing. I think my adrenalin carried me through and I was able to just get on with it but afterwards it was a little bit traumatising.

"If there hadn't been someone like me there that day then John would have died and his family would have faced Christmas and the new year without him."

Mr Ollernshaw, a dad of two and grandfather of three, had to be defibrillated on the way to the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro. In the ambulance, his wife was warned he was unlikely to survive the night.

"Our local vicar came with me to the hospital and by the time we got there the staff had managed to get him going on the machines because he wasn't able to do it himself," said Mrs Ollernshaw.

He remained on life support for four days before he was able to breathe on his own, then spent almost a month in hospital, during which he underwent heart-bypass surgery.

Alison Brown, cardiac rehab nurse at the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust, said: "It is fantastic that he was in a public place where there was someone who had been recently trained in CPR."

 

 

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Denmark setting the bar for CPR! | CPR Professionals Blog

People who suffer a cardiac arrest in Denmark today are three times more likely to survive than a decade ago, thanks largely to a national effort to teach people CPR, a new study says.

Denmark launched a national effort in 2005 to teach its residents to perform CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, in order to save people who suffer a cardiac arrest outside a hospital. The country gave out 150,000 instructional kits; kids began learning CPR as early as elementary school. Teens were required to learn CPR in order to get a driver’s license.

The results have been dramatic, say authors of a study in today’s Journal of the American Medical Association, or JAMA. About 300,000 people in North America each year suffer a cardiac arrest, when the heart stops beating, outside of a hospital.

In Denmark, the number of cardiac arrest victims who received “bystander” CPR — from someone other than a health professional — more than doubled, from 22% in 2001 to 45% in 2010.

In the same time period, the percentage of cardiac arrest victims who arrived at a hospital alive increased from 8% to 22%.

The percentage of patients alive after 30 days tripled, growing from 3.5% to 11%. The percentage of patients alive after one year also more than tripled, from 3% in 2001 to 10% in 2010.

Those findings are impressive, says Michael Sayre, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Washington and a spokesman for the American Heart Association.

Although other studies have looked at smaller, community efforts to promote CPR, Sayre says the new study is striking because it involved an entire country.

Thanks to efforts by the heart association, Washington and a handful of other states now require students to take a CPR class before graduating from high school, Sayre says.

Still, study authors say that Denmark’s CPR initiative can’t take all of the credit for improving survival.

That’s because Denmark also made other important changes aimed at increasing survival after a heart attack, such as improving the care provided both by hospitals and emergency medical services.

“Teaching bystanders the importance of CPR can make a difference,” says Suzanne Steinbaum, director of the program on women and heart disease Lenox Hill Hospital’s Heart and Vascular Institute, in New York.

Performing CPR is actually easier than ever, Steinbaum says. That’s because the heart association now recommends a “hands-only” CPR procedure, in which bystanders concentrate on performing chest compressions, instead of alternating compressions with mouth-to-mouth breathing.

“Those who witness a cardiac arrest and start CPR can actually change the outcome of what happens to the victim,” she says.

 

 

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Even lifesaving defibrillators need regular maintenance

Even lifesaving defibrillators need regular maintenance | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Portable, heart-shocking defibrillators are not fail-safe.

Like any machine, automated external defibrillators, or AEDs, need to be maintained. Batteries run down and need to be replaced.

Electrode pads that attach to a patient’s chest also deteriorate and have to be replaced every year or so. Circuitry can fail. And maintenance can be spotty.


SHNS photo courtesy American Red Cross Universal symbol and sign for an AED — a heart with a lightning bolt in the middle.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has received more than 45,000 reports of “adverse events” associated with failure of AEDs between 2005 and 2012, although only some of the events involved the fully automated devices put in public areas. The others were defibrillators limited to medical use. Manufacturers also conducted more than 80 recalls during the seven-year period.

The number of AEDs sold in the U.S. has been rising steadily, from around 100,000 a year in 2010 to between 500,000 and 1 million this year, according to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation and industry officials. There are about 2.5 million deployed.

“Survival from cardiac arrest depends on the reliable operation of AEDs,’’ said Dr. Lawrence DeLuca, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

He led a 2011 review of more than 40,000 AED malfunctions reported to the FDA between 1993 and 2008. The analysis found that 1,150 deaths occurred during those failures.

No one knows exactly how often someone attempts to use an AED, but with an average survival rate of 2 percent to 4 percent from sudden cardiac arrest outside a hospital, according to studies, the devices help save roughly 3,500 to 7,000 lives each year, although not all of the rescues are performed by untrained bystanders. If AEDs were more widely available, the number of saved lives could triple or more, experts say.

“AEDs can truly be lifesavers, but only if they are in good working order and people are willing to use them,’’ said DeLuca, who had a personal experience with batteries failing on a device when he was trying to revive a fellow guest at a resort in 2008.

It took nine minutes to retrieve a second AED, which did work. The patient was not revived.

Problems with pads, cables and batteries accounted for nearly half the failures — mistakes that could have been due to poor maintenance. Forty-five percent of failures linked to fatalities occurred when the device was attempting to charge (power up) and deliver a recommended shock to someone in cardiac arrest, DeLuca said.

But there also were incidents reported to the FDA when the devices shut down without analyzing a patient’s heart rhythm.

Regulators and watchdogs believe some victims were not revived when the machines failed, but it’s difficult to say whether any particular patient would have had heartbeat restored.

The FDA said the most common malfunction reports involved design flaws and manufacturing of the devices using poor-quality parts such as capacitors and software.

AED failures have raised enough concern that the FDA is ending the medium-risk status that AEDs have had since they first became widespread more than 20 years ago.

Now, they’ll be classified high-risk equipment that reflects their use to support and sustain human life — and their greatly increased sophistication over the years. Manufacturers will have to provide more safety evidence and FDA inspectors will be allowed to inspect plants where parts are made.

The tighter rules don’t mean the public should lack confidence in the lifesaving devices. Dr. William Meisel, the FDA’s chief scientist for devices, stressed the essential role AEDs play when he announced the new rules in March.

“These devices are critically important and serve a very important public-health need,” Meisel said, noting that none were being taken out of service beyond the recalls manufacturers have already issued. “Patients and the public should have confidence in these devices and we encourage people to use them under the appropriate circumstances.”

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How a health club’s AEDs saved 100 lives

How a health club’s AEDs saved 100 lives | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

David Lloyd Leisure’s health clubs do business throughout Europe; the company has 80 sites in the UK alone. With more than 440,000 members the company gets 25 million club visits a year. Since 1998, the David Lloyd Leisure staff has used AEDs to save the lives of more than 100 people.

There’s no legal requirement in the UK for fitness clubs to have automated external defibrillators (AEDs) on the premises. But the health and safety experts at David Lloyd Leisure insist on having AEDs readily accessible at every one of their busy clubs. This policy, along with staff training in AED use, has made a world of difference. Since 1999, David Lloyd Leisure has saved more than 100 lives.

“Our feeling is every fitness facility should have an AED, even if there’s no legal requirement,” says Caleb Brown, of the health and safety office at David Lloyd Leisure. “AEDs have become so affordable, and the response element is something which is really easy for a health club to do — they’ve already got team members available.”

One of Europe’s largest health and fitness businesses, David Lloyd Leisure started its AED program in 1998. At first, this simply meant ensuring that the reception desk at every facility had a defibrillator at hand.

A staff member from David Lloyd Leisure Brooklands with their Powerheart AED. Staff at the club used the AED to revive a member in 2010.

The return on investment in terms of lives saved was immediate, and the company nurtured the AED program. Brown, who joined the company in 2000, has been involved in the development of the company’s AED training program as part of overall safety training. Today, an AED is brought immediately to the scene of any health incident at one of the clubs.

While the survival rate for people who suffer outside-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest in the United Kingdom is less than 20 percent, the survival rate for someone who suffers cardiac arrest or another serious health incident at one of the David Lloyd Leisure clubs reached 88 percent in 2012.

How They Chose Powerheart AEDs

All David Lloyd Leisure clubs are equipped with at least one AED, and one large, six-story site has two defibrillators on the premises. All the AEDs — with the exception of devices at clubs recently acquired from other companies — are Cardiac Science Powerheart AED G3s. The Powerheart AEDs were chosen because they’re highly portable and easy to use, with long-lasting medical-grade batteries and Rescue-Ready technology that conducts an automatic self-check of the main components (battery, hardware, software, and pads) every day. When it’s nearing time to replace a battery, a Rescue Ready indicator on the AED turns red and sounds an alert.

“The Powerhearts are so easy to look after, and the maintenance system is brilliant,” Brown says.

In the aftermath of any incident in which an AED was required, the club replaces the used pads with a set of spares. Brown, or one of his health and safety team colleagues, then visits the club to download data from the AED for hospital use, write up an incident report, and supply a new set of spare pads.

Training: Key to a Successful AED Program

Brown, who took on a leadership role in the AED program in 2006, has designed training for club employees that enables them to respond with maximum speed and efficiency when a cardiac incident occurs.

“Because of the voice prompts, even an untrained bystander can use an AED,” Brown points out. “With a training program, you give people the ability to react faster in an event, which is going to increase chances of survival.”

Ambulance response time in urban areas in the UK is usually under 8 minutes, Brown noted, but for a sudden cardiac arrest victim that is often too late. Brown’s goal has been to train David Lloyd Leisure staff to get the AED to the victim, and the defibrillator pads on the victim’s chest, within 1 minute.

Once the pads are attached, the AED can diagnose the heart rhythm, and, if appropriate, administer a shock. The AED’s voice prompts coach the team through every step of the process, including administering CPR. The AEDs are programmed in accordance with the latest resuscitation guidelines, and David Lloyd Leisure bases its training on those same guidelines.

“I believe that some businesses overestimate the amount of training that is required for a successful AED program,” Brown says. “Our training is only two hours for an employee, once a year. With just that basic training, in the vast majority of incidents requiring an AED, we are able to get the pads onto the chest in less than a minute.”

In 2012, the company’s survival rate for incidents in which an AED was deployed reached 88 percent.

Case Study: Saving a Life at the Health Club

“I would not be alive now had it not been for the quick intervention of Paul, Laura,and others and their ability to resuscitate me,” a 45-year-old businessman wrote in a letter to David Lloyd Leisure. “I have been advised by doctors that if I had been anywhere else, in particularly where there was no defibrillator, I would not have survived.”

The man had collapsed while using a rowing machine at the North London club. Bystanders alerted the club’s team straightaway, and one of the team immediately started CPR. The AED was brought to the area and the pads put on immediately. The AED diagnosed a shockable heart rhythm and it administered one shock.

“By the time the ambulance crew arrived, the man was breathing and talking,” Caleb Brown, part of the company’s health and safety team, said. “He went on to make a complete recovery, went back to work, and he’s back at the club.”

Two members of the David Lloyd Leisure staff were directly involved in the rescue. One delivered CPR and the other used the AED. A half dozen others assisted, clearing members from the area and making sure there was access for the ambulance crew.

“The training I received in using the AED enabled me to use the AED with confidence and the clear voice prompts helped to keep me calm,” one of the rescuers reported after the incident. “It’s an amazing feeling to know that the actions I took resulted in a life being saved.”

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C.A.B. For Life an "American Heart Association" training facility brings life saving instruction to your Place of business, home, place of worship or community location.

Don't wait...It could be too late!

ahacabforlife@yahoo.com

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Automated External Defibrillators and the Urban myths

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a life-threatening condition that must be treated within minutes if the victim is to survive. The only therapy which can treat the life-threatening arrhythmia that occur during SCA is defibrillation; the earlier the better. Various studies have determined that for every minute defibrillation is delayed survival falls rapidly. In one study it was determined that this fall in survival was around 7 to 10% while the British Heart Foundation (BHF) have concluded that the fall in survival percentage is 14%.

Defibrillation for the SCA victim needs to be part of the 'pattern of care'; a well-establish process - the Chain of Survival - assists the rescuer in giving the victim the best chance of survival; call for help, early CPR, early defibrillation and advanced life support.

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDS) are designed specifically to enable non-medical rescuers to treat SCA victims as they are safe, easy to use and effective.

There are, however,  a number of myths and mis-information around the whole issue of SCA and the use of an AED.

Lay persons are often confused between a heart attack and a sudden cardiac arrest. These are two separate medical conditions and although the first can lead to the second, an AED is designed to treat the unresponsive, not breathing victim the indications for SCA and the use of an AED.

Clinically, defibrillation does not 'jump' start the heart. Delivery of a biphasic electrical current depolarises the heart cells allowing the organ's natural 'pacemaker cells' to re-start and the heart to return to normal electrical activity or sinus rhythm. During SCA the heart is exhibiting ventricular fibrillation (VF) ; a chaotic discharge of electrical current that prevents oxygenated blood from circulating or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT) which while more regular is still too fast to again allow the effective circulation of blood thus denying the brain of oxygen.

People often ask about the 'danger' of rescuers or bystanders receiving a shock if they are touching the victim of SCA during defibrillation. While we have adopted the historical warning 'stand clear' from the use of manual defibrillators, studies show that current leakage from a defibrillation device using adhesive pads is actually minimal. The majority of current delivered being discharged into the chest and heart. The actual amount of current leakage recorded in one study measured this as well below 2,500 microamps, the international standard relating to this threshold. To put this into layman's terms this equates to the current from a standard nine volt battery. The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines (2010) describes 29 instances of death or harm from a manual defibrillator, however this is a different type of device, produced for professional rescuers, utilising metal paddles (although some are available with adhesive defibrillation pads.

All in all, AEDs are safe, effective and easy to use so why would you not want to place these in your workplace or public area?

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Lack of defibrillators in hospitality industry raises concerns

Lack of defibrillators in hospitality industry raises concerns | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

The vast majority of British hospitality businesses do not have a defibrillator, despite the impact the device has on cardiac arrest survival rates, according to a recent report.

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Film reconstructing how a defib saved a man's life aims to encourage more groups to install them

Film reconstructing how a defib saved a man's life aims to encourage more groups to install them | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

https://youtu.be/VjXTzSQ-b2Y

 

A VIDEO reconstructing how a man was saved by a heart-starting defibrillator will be used to encourage more organisations to install the life-saving machines.

Ian Hough features in the video, called Pulled Through, produced by drp Video for West Midlands Ambulance Service. The film shows what happened to him when he suffered a cardiac arrest.

Mr Hough is a rower but his heart stopped during a regatta at Stourport Boat Club on August 13, 2011.

The club had no defibrillator but luckily there was medical cover on site for the event and the medics leapt into action, using their own machine to re-start his heart in the vital few minutes before paramedics arrived.

Mr Hough, 59, made a full recovery and continues to row – but he says without the defibrillator he firmly believes he would not have lived to see his daughter or granddaughter again.

He said: "I was dead for seven minutes.

"Had this happened on a normal day I would be dead.

"A cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at any time and in any place. I was lucky it happened during the regatta when a defibrillator was on site."

Stourport Boat Club has since installed a machine, as have a number of organisations across the country, including many in Stafford, Stone and Rugeley. The public access defibrillators provide instructions on what to do in an emergency and can save lives.

Ambulance bosses hope the video will encourage even more organisations to do the same.

Cliff Medlicott, from the service, said: "I would encourage as many people as possible to see the film. It is a compelling reconstruction of what happened."

 

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Wearable vest defibrillator for heart patients is saving lives

Wearable vest defibrillator for heart patients is saving lives | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Debra Chaffin, 59, was at risk for a sudden cardiac arrest, but fortunately she had the protection of a wearable defibrillator, a white undergarment that she credits with saving her life.
Facts

Eleven days after she was diagnosed with a weak heart, she was outfitted with a LifeVest she wore under her shirt.

The vest was a tight squeeze, but proved its worth on Nov. 9, 2014, when Debra started feeling nauseous.

She recalled lying down to rest and sending out a grandson for a sandwich, thinking she would feel better once she had something to eat.

“All I knew something was not right, something was wrong,” Chaffin said.

She soon lost consciousness.

The LifeVest, however, was not missing a beat, detecting a “ventricular fibrillation,” when the heart beats so rapidly that it shakes instead of delivering blood to the organs. The arrhythmia can be fatal if not treated quickly, said Dr. Ashraf Elsakr, her cardiologist with Advanced Cardiology in Port Orange.

The LifeVest delivered a shock that restored Debra’s normal heart function within a minute of detecting the arrhythmia. A gel was also released to improve the treatment and protect the skin.

The LifeVest delivered the shock without any bystander intervention except for older brother, Dana Morris, calling for an ambulance.

“She turned blue like a Smurf,” Morris recalled. “(I knew) that device went off. I called 9-1-1. It wasn’t a question.”

Debra was taken to Halifax Health Medical Center. Twelve family members followed her there.

The big group was a little bit intimidating for Elsakr, he recalled.

“I thought I better treat her right,” the doctor joked.

Morris was impressed how quickly the doctor took charge when Debra started having more attacks of ventricular fibrillation.

“Some family (members) collapsed and thought that was it,” Morris said. “That was when Capt. Kirk saved her.”

Morris compared Elsakr to the “Star Trek” commander because he looked like “Capt. Kirk at the console. ‘Spock, get me the reading on this. Uhura, get me this.’”

Elsakr said he recognized at the time that Debra needed a more permanent solution, an implantable defibrillator.

“There was no point in waiting,” Elsakr said.

The LifeVest had been a temporary solution, like a life preserver that keeps someone afloat in the ocean until the rescue boat arrives.

Another metaphor is that the LifeVest is considered a “bridge therapy.”

Once a heart condition is detected, insurance requirements typically mandates a waiting period of a few weeks to a few months to determine the best course of treatment, Elsakr explained.

The idea is to avoid rushing into something that is not best for the patient. Some patients will improve with a change in lifestyle and may not need an invasive procedure.

“It’s more or less appropriate to wait,” Elsakr said. “A lot of patients do get better. “

“I’m a believer that there are causes for everything,” he added. “You should try to seek the cause for the problem before you fix anything.”

Elsakr said Debra’s situation was complicated because she had an underlying lung condition.

To make sure she was safe, Elsakr prescribed her the LifeVest, which her insurance covered.

She had to wear it 24 hours a day, except for the shower. Sometimes she took it off when nobody else was around. It felt a little snug, she said.

The LifeVest also works as a heart monitor. An online patient management system allows clinicians to access patient data downloaded from the wearable defibrillator.

Manufactured by Zoll, a Pittsburgh-based company, it has been on the market since it was approved by the Food & Drug Administration in 2001.

Debra had not heard of the vest until Elsakr prescribed it for her. She would recommend it to anybody.

“You don’t want to lose your mom, your dad,” Debra said. “That’s what life is all about, family.”

 

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Every school in Edinburgh to get defibrillators

Every school in Edinburgh to get defibrillators | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

EVERY high school in the Capital will be equipped with a life-saving defibrillator to ensure that thousands of teenagers never suffer the terrible fate of teenage footballer Jamie Skinner. 

City chiefs have teamed up with the Scottish Ambulance Service to spend more than £34,000 on the vital devices for all 23 secondary schools in Edinburgh, following months of campaigning by the Skinner family and the Evening News.

The move has been hailed as a “great legacy” for super-fit Jamie, who suffered a fatal cardiac arrest while making his debut for Tynecastle FC at Saughton in December 2013.

His heartbroken family has fought tirelessly for better defibrillator provision, teaming up with the News to launch the Shockingly Easy campaign in July to ensure the heart-start machines are installed in every sports club in the Lothians.

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Minister backs campaign for vital CPR lessons in schools

Minister backs campaign for vital CPR lessons in schools | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Schools Minister David Laws backs Mail on Sunday campaign to introduce vital CPR lessons in schools

Every child could leave school with essential lifesaving skills after Ministers backed campaign to add first aid to curriculum
Mr Laws became the first high-profile member of Coalition to support move
He said: ‘All children should leave school with the essential skills and knowledge that prepares them for life'

Schools Minister David Laws became the first high-profile member of the Coalition to support the move

Every child could leave school with essential lifesaving skills after Ministers backed a Mail on Sunday campaign to add first aid to the curriculum.

Schools Minister David Laws became the first high-profile member of the Coalition to support the move, piling pressure on Education Secretary Nicky Morgan to introduce mandatory training for first aid in schools.

Mr Laws said the crucial skills should be taught as a compulsory part of Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) lessons, which also cover sex education, anti-bullying and careers advice.

The newspaper is campaigning to make sure all schools teach basic first aid techniques – simple acts that could save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. The skills can also be taught by older children to their younger peers.

Our campaign now has cross-party support and is also backed by teachers and a number of leading charities.

Mr Laws said: ‘Parents expect to see some basic standards laid out on what their children will learn in school. All children should leave school with the essential skills and knowledge that prepares them for life.

‘Liberal Democrats are clear that all schools should teach Personal, Social and Health Education, and that we would expect that to include first aid.’

Mr Laws’s statement comes after Lib Dems voted in October to include mandatory first aid training in schools in their latest manifesto.

Tory Health Minister Earl Howe has also voiced his support, saying: ‘First aid is a highly valuable, potentially lifesaving skill and I encourage schools to teach pupils first aid through their PSHE lessons.’

 

Lib Dem MP Sir Bob Russell, chairman of the all-party parliamentary group on first aid, said he hoped the other two main parties would also add the proposals to their pre-Election manifestos.

‘Mr Laws is considering these proposals,’ he said. ‘Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said he sees this as part of the preventative agenda.’

Other politicians backing the plans include Labour’s Julie Hilling and Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris.

Ms Hilling said: ‘This is as essential as learning to read or write. Learning to save a life is precious.’

Charities including St John Ambulance and the British Heart Foundation are also behind the scheme.

BHF chief executive Simon Gillespie said: ‘A future government will need to play its part by making CPR part of the curriculum – a move that already has the support of the public, teachers and doctors.’

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Man saved by heroic passers-by

Man saved by heroic passers-by | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

THE heroic actions of a quick thinking woman from Alcester and her friend saved a cyclist's life when he collapsed on a country road.

The man was cycling along Fish Hill near the Cotswold village of Broadway last March when he collapsed.

Fortunately he was spotted on the side of the road by Gemma Guedes, 30, from Alcester, and her friend Katie Nightingale, who were only travelling down the road by chance after taking a wrong turn on their way to take Gemma's pet puppy for a walk.

 

The pair spotted the man receiving CPR from a fellow cyclist and immediately remembered that there were defibrillators kept at the nearby Farncombe Estate, where they both used to work.

"It was very worrying to see someone receiving CPR as it was the first time that I have ever been in that situation," said Mrs Guedes. "We were just very lucky that Farncombe Estate was so close and that they have trained people to use the defibrillator."

The friends called ahead and were met by security supervisor Tony Haines, of Pensham, near Pershore, who had grabbed a defibrillator.

They dashed back to the stricken man with Mr Haines - an experienced St John Ambulance volunteer - in tow and used the defibrillator to re-start his heart.

He was then rushed to Worcestershire Royal Hospital, where grateful medics confirmed the cyclist would not have survived without the defibrillator and their quick-thinking actions.

"When we arrived the man was starting to turn blue around the lips - Tony gave him a single shock and his heart re-started. After a few minutes the man started talking, which was a huge relief to everyone.

"We waited for the Air Ambulance to arrive and once the man was airlifted to the hospital you could feel that everyone felt a great sense of achievement," added Mrs Guedes.

Mr Haines said he was glad the estate had the vital life-saving equipment . Both he and St John Ambulance are now urging more places, especially in isolated rural locations, to get equipment of their own.

Mr Haines said: “We gave the man a single shock and his heart restarted. Within a few minutes he was talking, it was amazing.

“This incident just goes to show what a difference a defibrillator can make and I would urge as many organisations as possible to have one on hand in case of emergency.”

 

 

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Take heart - new schools will all get defibrillators, supported by Michael Gove

Take heart - new schools will all get defibrillators, supported by Michael Gove | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

ALL new schools are to be equipped with life-saving defibrillators to cut the number of child heart deaths.

The move, supported by Education Secretary Michael Gove, will be announced in Chancellor George Osborne’s Budget later this month.

More than 270 pupils die after suffering heart attacks at school every year but, according to charity SADS, only 80 of 30,000 schools have automated external defibrillators, which cost £1,500.

Sick youngsters given an electric shock to the heart with the life-saving devices are 50 per cent more likely to survive a coronary than those who have to wait for an ambulance. The odds in rural areas are 75 per cent.

The initiative is being spearheaded by Conservative MP Andrew Percy, a trained first responder who has helped raise funds to buy defibrillators for six schools in his Brigg and Goole constituency. It is backed by the British Heart Foundation, Red Cross, St John Ambulance and Oliver King Foundation.

Mr Percy told the Sunday Express: “It is a national scandal that children are dying unnecessarily in this country because there are not enough public access defibrillators. A relatively small one-off investment could have a lasting legacy, which is why for me it is a complete no-brainer.”

Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011.

A year after Oliver’s death his family set up the Oliver King Foundation, which wants to see defibrillators installed in all schools, sports centres and other public buildings.

Oliver’s father, Mark, said: “We are losing children who are fit and healthy every week to cardiac arrests.

“When my own son died we waited more than 20 minutes for the ambulance to arrive and it was a seven-minute journey to hospital. I know that had there been a defibrillator on site, he would be here today.

“My question to the Government is why is there a postcode lottery with ­children’s lives with there being defibrillators at some schools and not others?”

 

 

ALL new schools are to be equipped with life-saving defibrillators to cut the number of child heart deaths.By: Marco GiannangeliPublished: Sun, March 9, 2014   

Defibrillators will be supplied to schools to cut down child heart attack deaths [GETTY]

The move, supported by Education Secretary Michael Gove, will be announced in Chancellor George Osborne’s Budget later this month.

More than 270 pupils die after suffering heart attacks at school every year but, according to charity Sads, only 80 of 30,000 schools have automated external defibrillators, which cost £1,500.

Sick youngsters given an electric shock to the heart with the life-saving devices are 50 per cent more likely to survive a coronary than those who have to wait for an ambulance. The odds in rural areas are 75 per cent.

The initiative is being spearheaded by Conservative MP Andrew Percy, a trained first responder who has helped raise funds to buy defibrillators for six schools in his Brigg and Goole constituency. It is backed by the British Heart Foundation, Red Cross, St John Ambulance and Oliver King Foundation.

Mr Percy told the Sunday Express: “It is a national scandal that children are dying unnecessarily in this country because there are not enough public access defibrillators. A relatively small one-off investment could have a lasting legacy, which is why for me it is a complete no-brainer.”

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Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011

Oliver King was just 12 when he died of a cardiac arrest while taking part in a school swimming race in 2011.

A year after Oliver’s death his family set up the Oliver King Foundation, which wants to see defibrillators installed in all schools, sports centres and other public buildings.

Oliver’s father, Mark, said: “We are losing children who are fit and healthy every week to cardiac arrests.

“When my own son died we waited more than 20 minutes for the ambulance to arrive and it was a seven-minute journey to hospital. I know that had there been a defibrillator on site, he would be here today.

“My question to the Government is why is there a postcode lottery with ­children’s lives with there being defibrillators at some schools and not others?”

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Making defibrillators as common as fire extinguishers could save lives

Making defibrillators as common as fire extinguishers could save lives | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Despite several campaigns to increase numbers of defibrillators in public places - and the English government's acknowledgement of their life-saving role - public access to them is low, as is understanding of their use, says a new UK study. The findings imply it would be a different story if defibrillators were as accessible and as well understood as fire extinguishers.

Estimates from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) suggest around 60,000 out of hospital cardiac arrests occur in the UK every year.

A defibrillator - also called an automated external defibrillator or AED - is a device that delivers an electric shock to the heart of someone who is having a cardiac arrest. Prompt use of an AED can shock the heart back into rhythm.

Acting quickly when someone is in cardiac arrest before the ambulance arrives can save their life. Every minute without CPR and defibrillation reduces their chance of survival by 10%.

The aim of the new UK study was to find out how available AEDs were, given the effort that has been put in over the last 10 years to promote and deploy them in public places, such as shopping centers and train stations.

The study was conducted by researchers from the University of Southamptom, working with the South Central Ambulance Service, and it is published in the journal Heart.

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My HeartMap Seattle Challenge enlists the public to locate city’s life-saving devices | UW Today

My HeartMap Seattle Challenge enlists the public to locate city’s life-saving devices | UW Today | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

Seattleites can join in a life-saving scavenger hunt. Players will compete to identify and report the locations of Seattle’s automatic external defibrillators, or AEDs, for a cash reward. Prizes range from $50 to $10,000.

AEDs are electronic briefcase-size devices designed to allow bystanders on scene at a medical emergency to help someone who has collapsed with loss of mechanical activity of the heart, or cardiac arrest.

“Our list of AED locations may be incomplete. We are seeking the public’s help to learn where more of these devices are,” said Dr. Graham Nichol, University of Washington professor of medicine in the Center for Pre-Hospital Emergency Care at UW Medicine’s Harborview Medical Center.

AEDs are cost-effective lifesavers that are often placed where cardiac arrests are most likely, such as airports, sports clubs and shopping malls, according to Nichol, who explained why it is important for a bystander to be able to locate an AED immediately.

“Cardiac arrests are a leading cause of death in the United States but can be treated if recognized and responded to quickly with an AED.”

 

Often cardiac arrest is due to ventricular fibrillation, in which the lower chambers of the heart quiver instead of contracting in a steady beat. AEDs simplify analysis of the heart rhythm. This enables lay people to recognize and treat ventricular fibrillation before emergency medical services providers arrive. Each device has voice and visual prompts that guide bystanders through the necessary steps.

More than 1.2 million AEDs are now in public places in the United States, and about 180,000 more are installed each year. Sometimes bystanders cannot find the nearest AED during a medical emergency. That’s where the My HeartMap Seattle challenge comes in. Game players will assist UW clinicians by reporting the location of AEDs in community settings throughout Seattle.

Here are the basic rules of the game.

  The contest starts Tuesday, Oct.15, and ends Friday, Nov. 15.  Complete your free registration to participate in the contest.  When you locate an AED in Seattle, report a brief description of it on the contest website, including the building address for the AED, its location within the building, and whether the device appears to be ready for use.  A $10,000 grand prize will be awarded to the individual or team that identifies the most unique AEDs. “Unique” means no other player or team has already found the AED. The grand prize will be “unlocked” when at least one individual or team identifies 500 AEDs or all contest participants collectively identify 750 AEDs.  Twenty $50 prizes are also available. Twenty AEDs in the city of Seattle have been pre-selected by the research team as “Golden AEDs.” These are unmarked, and those who are first to report a “Golden AED” will win $50.  You can follow MyHeartMap Seattle on twitter (@cprnation, #MyHeartMapSeattle) or at the CPR Nation website.

The AED scavenger hunt aims to build public awareness about AEDs, which are commonly contained in a clear glass wall box, sometimes near a fire extinguisher. The spot is generally marked with a symbol of an electrical charge passing through a heart shape.

The contest is modeled after a similar Philadelphia County project at the University of Pennsylvania, which in turn adapted an approach from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for its Red Balloon Challenge. Dr. Raina Merchant, University of Pennsylvania assistant professor of emergency medicine, directed the My HeartMap Philadelphia Challenge. She is the director of the Penn Medicine Social Media Lab and an expert in the use of digital strategies to educate the public on at-the-scene emergency aid. Merchant is collaborating with UW scientists on the My HeartMap Seattle Challenge.

“This is an exciting collaboration that could have a real impact on access to emergency care in Seattle and other regions throughout the country,” noted Merchant.

During the MyHeartMap Philadelphia challenge, participants submitted data about AED locations via a website and a phone app. Some 313 individuals and teams reported more than 1,400 AEDs. Prizes were given for reporting the most AEDs found or for being the first to report the location of specific previously selected devices.

“Most people realize that AEDs are simple enough to use,” Nichol said. “Just follow the voice and visual prompts. They are designed to provide a shock only when needed.”

An AED is usually activated by opening its lid. The commands then begin with visual, recorded and text instructions for baring the patient’s chest and sticking on the pads. Then the machine asks everyone to step back while it analyzes the heart rhythm. It repeats the request to stand clear if it decides to administer a shock. If the rhythm suddenly normalizes before a shock is delivered, the machine will report a rhythm change and announce that no shock will occur.

Most machines also instruct in CPR and coach the timing of compressions and breaths.

“My HeartMap Seattle will help us improve care for patient with out of hospital cardiac arrest,” Nichol said. “The methods and results of this AED scavenger hunt in Seattle will be applied to scavenger hunts in other large cities throughout the United States. In the future, we will have a comprehensive record of AED locations throughout the country.”

My HeartMap Seattle is funded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Zoll Medical Inc., Philips Healthcare Inc., Physio-Control Inc., HeartSine Technologies Inc. and Cardiac Science Inc.

The collaborating sponsors include the American Heart Association, Medic One Foundation, Nick of Time Foundation, University of Pennsylvania and University of Washington.

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AEDs can save lives, but units, knowledge to use them, scarce

Sudden cardiac arrest — when, without warning, the heart instantly stops beating — kills 350,000 Americans of various ages and occupations a year, according to the American Heart Association.

Yet now, with high school sports teams beginning their fall seasons, now is when we are most aware of these fatalities because of a tragic drama: A young football player in peak condition, who has never flunked a physical or shown the faintest symptom of cardiac problems, suddenly collapses.

Death is usually all but instantaneous — but it is not necessarily inevitable, not if a device called an Automated External Defibrillator, or AED, and someone willing to use it are close at hand.

Sudden cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack, which usually is caused by blocked arteries and often gives some advance warning. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the electrical impulses that control the heart suddenly misfire.

The mild electric shock from an AED “resets” the heart and allows it to resume normal function. Bystanders revive several thousand people this way each year. More widespread use of the devices could save at least 20,000 more, according to the American Red Cross.

Since their introduction in the 1950s, AEDs have become smaller, simpler and basically foolproof; in one study, sixth-graders mastered them quickly and easily. There are about 2.5 million AEDs in the country, far short of the 30 million experts say are needed just to cover metropolitan areas and far short of the Red Cross goal of having every person in America within four minutes of an AED.

There are no good reasons why AEDs are not now widely and readily available. They should be and the solution may require a certain amount of public outcry and political attention.

Uniform national standards need to replace the often complex and inconsistent state and local rules on where and how AEDs are placed — ordering that they be placed prominently, like fire extinguishers, and regularly maintained.

The AEDs should clearly display the good Samaritan legal exception — all states have them — that protects from liability for injury or wrongful death people who voluntarily and in good faith try to save a life.

Says one manufacturer of AEDs, “It’s kind of blunt, but the bottom line is that when you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re dead before you hit the ground. There’s no way you can cause that victim any more harm using that device. You’re trying to bring them back.”

Unlike TV hospital dramas, AEDs do not have paddles that administer massive jolts. Two adhesive leads attach to the chest and the shock, if the machine’s diagnostics say one is needed, scarcely causes the patient’s chest muscles to twitch — and the newer devices will talk the user through the process.

An American public that had no problem mastering smartphones should have even less difficulty with AEDs once they are highly visible and readily accessible.Click here to edit the title

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Stafford woman campaigns for map of life saving defibrillators in Stafford Borough

Stafford woman campaigns for map of life saving defibrillators in Stafford Borough | First Aid Training | Scoop.it
A STAFFORD woman who was brought back from the dead after having a cardiac arrest has bought a defibrillator for the town centre.
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Adam Leverett's curator insight, September 3, 2013 12:57 PM

You would thinks things like this would be "no-brainers" - why should it have to be a campaign?

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Villagers turn old phone box into mini A&E with life-saving machine

Villagers turn old phone box into mini A&E with life-saving machine | First Aid Training | Scoop.it
A DEFIBRILLATOR has been installed in a rural red call box after locals bought the kiosk from BT for a pound.

AN old phone box has been transformed into a potential lifesaver after being purchased by villagers for £1.

A defibrillator, which gives the heart an electric shock in some cases of cardiac arrest, has been installed in the red call box.

And as the nearest accident and emergency department is 20 minutes' drive away, the machine could mean the difference between life and death.

The call box in Arnprior, Stirlingshire, was bought by the community from British Telecom under the company’s Adopt a Kiosk scheme.

Funding for the defibrillator came from various organisations, including Stirling Council and the Sandpiper Trust, who aim to provide Scotland’s rural doctors and nurses with emergency medical equipment.

A BT spokesman said: “We’re very pleased to hear that the villagers of Arnprior have found a new lease of life for one of our old, rarely used boxes.

“Over the years, many people have described their local phone box as a lifeline. Now that everyone has a phone at home or a mobile, that’s no longer true.

“But kiosks fitted with defibrillator machines could be real life savers for the community in the future.”

The Scottish Ambulance Service and the Community Heartbeat Trust, a charity dedicated to the provision of defibrillation services to local communities, gave their help to the project.

Backing also came from the community council and Stirling Council’s Community Pride fund. Villagers were given advice and training on how to use the defribillator.

And children from the local primary school will be on hand to help open the lifesaving installation on Monday.

A spokesman for the Sandpiper Trust said they were delighted to have been involved in the Arnprior project.

He said: “It has become increasingly clear over the past decade since the trust was set up that working together with all these organisations is what saves lives.

“We are also pleased that the children of Arnprior School have been involved in this project.”

More than 100 traditional red kiosks in Scotland have been adopted by their local communities for £1.

Arnprior is the second community in Scotland to have a defibrillator fitted in their call box.

Glendaruel Village, Argyll, was the first in 2011.

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Understanding Defibrillators (AEDs)

Understanding Defibrillators (AEDs) | First Aid Training | Scoop.it

A defibrillator is a life saving device that issues a electrical shock to the heart in some cases of cardiac arrest. This process is called defibrillation and can help save lives. Cardiac arrest happens when the heart stops pumping bloody around the body. At this time it is critical that defibrillation happens as soon as possible.

This electrical shock depolarizes a critical mass of the heart muscle, terminates the arrhythmia, and allows the natural rhythm  of the heart to be re-established by the body’s organic pacemaker, in the sinoatrial node of the heart.

According to the British heart foundation for every minute that a patient is not giving defibrillation their chances of survival decrease by 14 per cent. In fact research also show that’s providing a shock within five minutes of the patient collapsing provide the best chance of survival.

Defibrillators can come in many forms and sizes. These can be external, transvenous, or implanted. This will all depend on the device used. The most common devices are called automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and because they automate the defibrillation process, by automation of the treatable rhythms, meaning that bystanders or people with very little or no training at all can use them.

Because of the importance of the defibrillators and the low numbers available, it is vital that these devices are strategically placed within an area. These are often placed where an ambulance would find it difficult to get to -  i.e.,  placed with traffic congestion, poor infrastructure, or where large crowds gather.

Defibrillation was first successfully performed in 1899 by two physiologists in Switzerland. It was found that small electrical shocks could induce ventricular fibrillation in dogs. However, it wasn’t until 1933 that a serious alternative to injecting powerful drugs straight to the heart. Dr Albert Hyman came up with the invention of a hollow needle, an insulated wire to the heart to deliver the electrical shocks.

These days Defibrillators have come a long way from the Hyman days. In order to use the AED, the machine is turned on and then a voice prompt will instruct the rescuer on what to do. The voice prompts the rescuer to place the pads into position on the chest and these then detect if a shock is needed by reading activity in the heart.

Defibrillation should never be seen as an alternative to to CPR, which can help by time before defibrillation is needed. The British Heart Foundation state that if more GP surgeries were equipped with defibrillators that survival could be increased by up to 60 per cent if the patient is treated immediately after entering cardiac arrest.

AED’s are often placed in highly visible areas and it is not recommended that these should be placed in locked or code restricted cabinets as this makes them inaccessible in time of emergency where the time taken is of essence. AED’s are often brightly coloured, and are often encased in protective cases. When these protective cases are opened nearby staff are alerted by a buzzer.

 

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